1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: New bike setup.

  1. #1
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    New bike setup.

    I am expecting a new bike in the mail tomorrow and was wondering what steps to take in setting up the bike. I don't want to go into what bike it is because I don't intend this to be a discussion on if it was a good or bad choice. It is a hard tail with disk brakes, shimano trigger shifters, and a 100mm travel front fork. What I am wondering is if there are certain steps that one should take in the initial setup of the bike. I have been racing RC cars for many years and know that you can build a car or you can build it right. They are two totally different things. Building can take a couple of evenings, and building right can take a week or more. I'm thinking it may be the same way with bikes. So here are a couple of questions:

    Is it a good idea to remove the rotors and wet sand them on a true, flat surface to ensure that they are free of defects, or is that over kill?

    What about the calipers? Any setup tips for them?

    Should I grease/oil the brake and shifter cables?

    What about shimming? Is there anything on a bike that could gain from proper shimming?

    Does anything need to be thread locked, and if so what? Medium or strong thread lock?

    I know I will have to setup my shifters to shift correctly and get the brakes to grab the way I like, but I'm looking for the less obvious tips. Any help would be greatly appreciated. If anyone can tell me about common mistakes for a new builder to make, or for the factory to make, I would like to hear from you. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    You don't really need to sand the rotors, as that only makes them thinner...

    You should use mild locktight on the screws that attatch the rotor to the hub, just so vibrations dont loosen them

  3. #3
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    I figured that I would need the thread lock on the rotors, but wasn't sure. As for sanding, I wasn't going to use more than 800-1600 wet/dry sandpaper. It seemed like something that racers and performance seekers would do. Thanks for the help.

  4. #4
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    Basically the only times you'll _MAYBE_ have to sand down your rotors is if the holes start getting very sharp with little 'spurrs' and digging into your pads. But I remember seeing something about getting a drill bit the size of the hole, and by hand, running it back and forth in the holes..

  5. #5
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    If you take the time and be methodical about the setup things shouldn't need more work then to make sure everything is mounted straight. Most of the time when you get a bike in a box all that is really needed to do is put on the pedals, handle bar, seat, front wheel and air up the tires. Then fine tune the brakes and shifting.

    If the rotors are already mounted leave them alone. I don't know of anyone who sands rotors unless you get fluid on the them then ride and burn them.

    Brake setup differs from one to the other. Mech disc can be different from Hydro. This is where shimming might come into play depending on the type of mount the brakes utilize.

    The cables should have some assembly lube on them. When you do your maintainence it would be a good idea the lube them.

    If you do Loc-Tite anything use the blue.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for everyones help. I got the bike up and running and need only to make a few more adjustments. Shifting needs some refining, and I want to fine tune the brakes since the front brake lever seems to have more throw than the rear. They both work fine, but I like uniformity. The only thing that I could use some help with right now is the fork set up. I have a Suntour Duro with 100mm of travel. It should only have preload adjustments, but I'm not sure. Suntour's site doesn't list my exact model. Both tubes on the fork have a knob on top but I don't know how to correctly adjust them. Any one know for sure?

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