1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New Bike Purchase Have a few ?

    Just discovered this site and its great; thanks to all the regular posters that make site what it is.

    I am in the process of buying my first CX hard tail MTB. Right now I have been using a friendís older hard tail and I like it and want to purchase my own.

    A little background info: I am an American living and working in Mian Yang, Sichuan China. There is a Trek dealership (confirmed to be legit via email to their main office in the US), a Giant dealership (a little more on that later), and a custom bike shop that sells Mosso mtb frames. What I found out about Mosso is that itís a brand from Taiwan and they are made in the same factory that most of the other major brands are. I have a feeling they copy some of the design specs and self brand it but I am not sure.

    The Giant brand is different in the US and in China. They have different models and I have read some stuff about Giant frames sold in China not having the same build standards as those sold in the US.

    The area I live in is fairly mountainous. Lots of up hills and downhill. I will about 60% of the time be using the bike to get into town and back. The rest will be off pavement.


    With that said I have decided to go with this frame, the Trek 2010 6700. I can buy the frame here for about $280 American. I can also bike the bike that is listed on Treks website http://www.trekbikes.com/uk/en/bikes...ies/6700disce/
    For about $1,400 and the trek store will give me 10% of the amount I paid in free stuff that they sell.


    Now come the questions.

    First of the crankset. I have been reading reviews and checking prices for about 10hrs over the past week and still havenít been able to get this answered. Other then weight and strength what is the need to get a more expensive crankset? I read one review that said get the best frame you can afford, and then get the best crankset you can afford and finally get the best real derailleur you can afford. How valid is this info?

    Brakes. The bike I have been using was about $480 American with everything said and done. It has the cheapest avid disc brakes. I notice when I riding downhill that the bike doesnít stop as fast as I would like it to. So I need to start hitting the brakes earlier then when I want to actually stop. I am guessing better brakes will fix that. Also what is the main advantage of going from mechanical disc to hydraulic disc? Will there be more up keep with the hydraulic disc?

    Rear derailleur. The bike I am using now has shimano Alivio parts throughout. I notice when shifting that is very jerk every time I shift. I donít use clip less pedals so my feet actually lose pedal placement every time I shift. Is this because Alivio is their entry level product or because of something else; skill, wd40, broken RD, etc? Will upgrading the RD help with this?

    There is a bike dealer where the owner custom makes all his wheels. Need some advice on what kind of hubs you would suggest and what kind of rims would go well with my riding preferences.

    Last question, thanks for reading if you made it this far The front fork. The current fork I am using is SRSuntour xcmv2. I know you get what you pay for. I tried to look at reviews of forks and a lot of it was greek to me. I have never used any other fork so I donít really have a basis of judging them. The fork I us I can turn it into a hard fork (donít know if that is the right term) and I do that when going up hill. I can buy most kinds of rock sock forks from the trek dealership. When I went to the rock shock website it was over kill as to how many different makes and models they offer. Again I donít want to spend too much right now but what fork would you suggest for my use.

    My idea is to buy the frame and then put in shimano doreo parts and cheep avid hydraulic brakes and a semi decent front fork. Then upgrade later when I get more experienced. Any kind of feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks again for everyone that took time to read this.

  2. #2
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    Do you already own some of the parts you will be putting on that frame? If not, you probably will be better off just buying that complete bike, or a lower model if you can't afford that one right now. All the HT frames in Trek's 6 series are the same, I believe, so you can get the whole bike you can afford now and upgrade as you need to.

    Regarding which components are most important, I wouldn't put either the crank or the RD at the top of the list. In order I would say for a hardtail bike, a decent frame, fork, and wheelset are pretty close to a tie, followed by brakes, shifters, then the rest of the drivetrain and transmission. A good saddle is a must, comfort being much more important than the most expensive/lightest.

    Regarding brakes, specifically mechanical disks vs. hydros, stopping power is pretty similar between the best of each, modulation easily goes to the better mechanical brakes.

    David B.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the quick response David. The bike I am currently using is my friendís older mtb. As mentioned before it was about $400 for everything, shimano alivo, basic front fork, etc.

    I donít think itís worth buying to salvage any of the parts.

    So in your advice you suggest I spend about the same on the frame, fork, and wheel set. Meaning if I spend about $300 on the frame then I should think about buying a $300 fork and a $300 wheel set. That gives me a decent estimate to work around. I tried to find a site where I could figure out where the money goes when I buy a full bike from a dealer. Meaning 25% of cost goes to frame, 25% to fork, 25% to wheels, and 25% to rest for example.

    ďmodulation easily goes to the better mechanical brakes.Ē I am not exactly sure what you mean by this. Do you mean that mech brakes are more mix and match then their hydraulic counter parts? Where if I wanted to upgrade say the rotor and I had a hydraulic set up I would need to replace the entire brake system where as with a mech brake I could just replace the one item I want replaced, i.e. lever, brake pad, rotor?

    Thanks again for any and help given.

  4. #4
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    Couple follow ups.

    First, the costs don't follow from what is most important. You can usually find a decent fork for less than a frame. Wheelsets too. For instance, if you take a look at http://www.jensonusa.com you'll see that they have a really nice HT frame for $300 (Voodoo Bokor), a wheelset that is very well regarded as a good budget choice for $95, and several RockShox forks in the $200 range. These are just examples.

    By modulation what I mean is that mechanical disks tend to be more "on/off", in my experience. Hydros allow you to modulate the braking power better, so you can get to just short of wheel lockup, stopping you more effectively. They are also better for feathering the brakes in rough downhills, etc.

    I would really encourage you to get a complete bike if you can find one in your price range. Trek has many options to get you on trails now. Is it difficult to get a complete bike from the Trek dealer you mention?

    David B.

  5. #5
    turtles make me hot
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    I see bikes online that seem to have a great mix of parts for the money. I'm assisting a couple of guys at my job find bikes. We're seeing bikes with Rockshox Tora air forks, WTB rims, Sram X7 shifters and rear derailler and Avid Juicy 5 brakes for just under a grand. Sometimes the frames are a brand we haven't heard of, but one guy is getting an Access 29er and I think it'll be a great deal.
    BTW, your bike could be shifting poorly because it might need new cables.
    I like turtles

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