1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
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    New bike = disappointed!

    Picked up my new 23" Rockhopper today. I was very excited it came in early so I could ride it this weekend. When I arrived the LBS simply said I hope this one is big enough! I'm 6'5, so we ordered the largest rockhopper available. Not really and adjustment on the seat, stem, or bars and not much checking in general. Decided to ride the bike home and had to turn around in the parking lot to have the front deraileur adjusted. After that I headed home. I stood up on the pedals right before a speed bump and it felt like the chain came completely off. As I continued to ride, I noticed that every time I crank the pedals hard, the same thing happens. It's as if it slips off line and then catches again. Once home, I noticed the the bike skips from 1st to 3rd gear, and still rubs while on the second sprocket. I'm a newbie, and can't help but wondering if I made a bad decision. I'll take the bike back tomorrow for another round of adjustments. Any thoughts on my problems and the best way to approach the LBS?

  2. #2
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    I pickep up a Rockhopper today and the same exact thing happend to me several times. I stood up on the pedals to crank hard and something slipped and caught again.

  3. #3
    sadly, like the element
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    Are you cross chaining it? (Running chain lines that aren't very straight, like small front - small rear, or big front - big rear, or lots of torque on the middle ring front -big ring back.)

  4. #4
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    I wouldn't get too upset about the situation. Your drivetrain is just a bit out of tune. Take it back to the shop and I'm sure they'll fix the problem.

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    I see two great suggestions.

    People who are new to deraileur gears might not pay enough attention to using the best combinations of front and rear gears.

    New bikes take a while to settle in, cables stretching and what not. The shop should be able to fix it. Also, if you did not get instructions for adjusting the gears yourself, you can download them from the manufacturer's website (I do not know if Rockhoppers use Shimano or SRAM components).

  6. #6
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    SJA- Don't get too upset. I am fairly certain the drivetrain needs a bit of tweaking. Easy fix.

  7. #7
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    I have to agree with the derailleur needing to be adjusted.

    I think all derailleurs adjusted to a "standard" (x amount of turns out after it has been bottomed out) when it is assembled to make it go faster for the workers to get the bike out the door.

    Now since that no 2 people are exactly the same - height, weight, riding style, etc. - there will be a few adjustments in the beginning to be made before it is dialed in properly.

    I should add that my new bike needed the derailleur adjusted after a week of riding because it was jumping gears and after a couple more weeks, it needs to be adjusted again.

  8. #8
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    Took my Rockhopper back to the LBS for an adjustment which has fixed my problem so far.

  9. #9
    Vaginatarian
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    sounds like the lbs is slacking off. the bike should have been fitted to you and checked over before you ever rode it

  10. #10
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    Hey SJA1172,

    How do you like the fitment of your rockhopper over all? Im 6'5 as well and I tested a 21" and it felt pretty well, they didnt have a 23" though. Did you ever ride a 21" a alot better on the one you have now? Im a newbie as well.

  11. #11
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mpower
    Took my Rockhopper back to the LBS for an adjustment which has fixed my problem so far.
    If nothing is broken or bent, and all the bolts are tight, adjusting the gears is really easy and quick. It is mainly about getting the cable tension right, so that the deraileur feeds the chain straight onto the cog.

    As I said before, new cables always stretch. After a while they stop stretching and you should be OK until parts start wearing out or your deraileur meets an immovable object

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mpower
    Took my Rockhopper back to the LBS for an adjustment which has fixed my problem so far.
    I picked up my new bike almost a year ago and went through the same problem. However, I quickly learned that two main functions of the bike are run with cables, brakes and derailleurs. And with those cables come components that even if they're off by just a millimeter, it can alter the performance of that function.

    Unfortunately, because your bike is new, it will need to be adjusted again real soon for optimal performance. There will be a time when it will be smooth for a while, but eventually, an adjustment here and there will be needed after a ride or two. That's why it's much more convenient for a new rider to learn about basic maintanence, so you don't have to keep running the bike back to the shop.

  13. #13
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    A new bike will have it's problems, especially in the drivetrain departement.

    The cables stretch with use, they can be misadjusted from the start and whatnot. Nothing unfixable, and nothing about the quality of the bike itself. Derailleurs work only as good as the person that has adjusted them.

    Wheels will most likely come out of true pretty soon, the spokes will have loosened, tighten 'em up or have them tightened and you're all set for loads of fun!

  14. #14
    I post too much.
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    A new bike will have it's problems, especially in the drivetrain departement.

    The cables stretch with use, they can be misadjusted from the start and whatnot. Nothing unfixable, and nothing about the quality of the bike itself. Derailleurs work only as good as the person that has adjusted them.

    Wheels will most likely come out of true pretty soon, the spokes will have loosened, tighten 'em up or have them tightened and you're all set for loads of fun!

  15. #15
    College Boy
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    I have a 21in rockhopper and early on it issues in the drive train. Right now it is in need of a tune on up the cables.
    As for the chain dropping my 07 rockhopper had that problem for the first few rides any time I put a load on it the thing seem to drop and it was driving me nuts (and it almost cause me to rack myself once). But after a few rides with some load it just went away and I have not seen that chain dropping in a while. Heck now I will put some pretty heavy loads on the chain and it has no problems at all.
    So the chain problem will go away give it some time. I think it just take some time for you gears and chain to break in a little and once it happens they will be golden,

  16. #16
    College Boy
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    I have a 21in rockhopper and early on it issues in the drive train. Right now it is in need of a tune on up the cables.
    As for the chain dropping my 07 rockhopper had that problem for the first few rides any time I put a load on it the thing seem to drop and it was driving me nuts (and it almost cause me to rack myself once). But after a few rides with some load it just went away and I have not seen that chain dropping in a while. Heck now I will put some pretty heavy loads on the chain and it has no problems at all.
    So the chain problem will go away give it some time. I think it just take some time for you gears and chain to break in a little and once it happens they will be golden,

  17. #17
    Zero Miles from Myself
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    I would also consider checking for Stiff Links in the Chain as this can cause all kinds of deraillure problems and ghost shifting. I have had this problem on 2 brand new bikes. You can loosen links by grabbing the chain on either side of the stiff link and flexing it across the chain. This will open up the pins and free the links.

  18. #18
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    All the shop had was 21 as well. Rode it and really liked it. They also had an xxl hardrock comp which is 24". Had the shop order a 23". I'm almost 6'5 but my inseam is around 34.5". I'd try and find a 23" bike if I were you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timeless
    I have a 21in rockhopper and early on it issues in the drive train. Right now it is in need of a tune on up the cables.
    As for the chain dropping my 07 rockhopper had that problem for the first few rides any time I put a load on it the thing seem to drop and it was driving me nuts (and it almost cause me to rack myself once). But after a few rides with some load it just went away and I have not seen that chain dropping in a while. Heck now I will put some pretty heavy loads on the chain and it has no problems at all.
    So the chain problem will go away give it some time. I think it just take some time for you gears and chain to break in a little and once it happens they will be golden,
    I think more than likely, your bike needed to have the cable adjusted (looser) and after awhile the new cable stretched enough to fix the problem. His bike may need the cable tighter and waiting would only make it worse

  20. #20
    College Boy
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    I think more than likely, your bike needed to have the cable adjusted (looser) and after awhile the new cable stretched enough to fix the problem. His bike may need the cable tighter and waiting would only make it worse
    and I think the chain one will work it way out on it own. that is how it did for my bike. It would always drop the chain off during a heavy load the first few rides (that being road or off road). And after a short while it just went away never to be seen again.
    Just ride it for a while and lets everything break in and then your bike will just need to be dialed in. I am taking my bike in for a tune up this week to finally get it dialed in.

  21. #21
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    I am thinking now that I am reading these posts that I am riding too small of a bike. I am 6'0 with a 35" inseam and riding a GF 21" hardtail. I am always wondering why I have to raise the freakin seat so high. Any suggestions?

  22. #22
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    in comparing your proportions

    Quote Originally Posted by Sambolina
    I am thinking now that I am reading these posts that I am riding too small of a bike. I am 6'0 with a 35" inseam and riding a GF 21" hardtail. I am always wondering why I have to raise the freakin seat so high. Any suggestions?
    to sja's (6'5", 35")... someone could use the services of a custom built frame. I don't know which one of you has "normal" leg to height proportions, but I don't think the both of you would be comfortable on the same bike. Even if standover height was correct, given your inseam, you might be too stretched out on the same bike that fit him (not factoring in arm length).

    it's possible that a 23" frame would fit your inseam, but the toptube length might be too long. don't trade in the 21" until you've been properly fitted. if you had arms just as long as your legs, then it's possible the 23" would fit you just fine. did the bike shop have a larger sized frame for you to try out? riding with a long seatpost may be your best option for the short-term, custom frames are expensive.

    get what feels right for you, not what some guy on the internet says. I seem to fit well on anything labeled "medium" so my advice may not be the best.
    Last edited by BundokBiker; 05-16-2007 at 03:39 PM. Reason: grammer

  23. #23
    dh1
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    Quote Originally Posted by BundokBiker
    to sja's (6'5", 35")... someone could use the services of a custom built frame. I don't know which one of you has "normal" leg to height proportions, but I don't think the both of you would be comfortable on the same bike. Even if standover height was correct, given your inseam, you might be too stretched out on the same bike that fit him (not factoring in arm length).

    it's possible that a 23" frame would fit your inseam, but the toptube length might be too long. don't trade in the 21" until you've been properly fitted. if you had arms just as long as your legs, then it's possible the 23" would fit you just fine. did the bike shop have a larger sized frame for you to try out? riding with a long seatpost may be your best option for the short-term, custom frames are expensive.

    get what feels right for you, not what some guy on the internet says. I seem to fit well on anything labeled "medium" so my advice may not be the best.
    This gets my vote too. If you are 6ft with a 35 inch inseam, you have really long legs for your overall height. You should get measured by a competent shop. I doubt you will have to go with an expensive custom frame, but you may find out that playing with the seat, stem, and bars will give you a more comfortable setting.

    My brother is 1 inch taller than me, same inseam, weighs 80 lbs more. He cant stand riding my bike. One extra inch in the torso and the additional weight around the middle and he feels way too cramped in the seat to handlebar area. With a riser bar, it would be comfortable for him, but it's not his bike.

    My point is, until you get a good feel for how to do this, you should get fitted by a pro. You could go broke trying new combinations of seats, stems, and bars until you get the right setup.

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