1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    123

    New 9er: opinions on buying online

    Hey, guys and gals!

    Going to be pulling the trigger on a new ride after being on my current steed for about 5 years. Coming from a 26" rockhopper hardtail. Wanting to go 29er FS. Budget is under 2k.

    Here's the question for your esteemed consideration. How many of you would be comfortable buying online without a real chance to get on a bike and ride it?

    I'm pretty inclined to buy online because I want to do some of the work to get a feel for the bikes setup and to learn more about the mechanics of them. Also, I think the value is better than what can be found in a shop. I have also never ride a bike that didn't fit after minor adjustments. So, I'm not overly concerned about the fit (again, only because I've never had problems with it).

    On the other hand, I really like the guys at the bike shop! I like the idea of shopping locally, too. Just wish their decently-spec'd rides weren't 3k!

    Bike suggestions are welcome; currently thinking about the airborne hobgoblin, gt sensor 9r elite and diamondback sortie 29er.

    Not looking just for bike recommendations, more for advice, similar experiences, sage comments, pithy remarks and jokes. Thanks, all!
    Last edited by akaHector; 06-06-2013 at 09:38 AM.

  2. #2
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,384
    I bought one bike locally and bought my second bike online but only because the deal was way too good to pass up (Brand new GT Sensor Elite 9R for $1k)

    So if it was a great deal, than yes I would buy online.

    Buying locally is great, but it would have cost me $1k more.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    123
    Did you get to actually ride the gt before you bought? And it seems like most bikes online are better deals than at the bike shop.

  4. #4
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,384
    No, I didn't ride it prior to buying it.

    Better deal is a matter of opinion.
    Just because it is cheaper, it does not make it a better deal.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    11
    I bought an Airborne Guardian earlier this year and it was a great experience. I'm pretty new to the sport (not biking, but 'serious' mountain biking) so I don't know if being able to test ride really would have made a difference for me. It was mostly a cost thing that drove my decision, and seeing a lot of good reviews on the bike helped me be comfortable with not seeing it in person.

    I still like my local bike shops, but ill just have to support them with secondary stuff like seat, handlebars, and other accessories for now since a bike from them just wasn't in my budget.

    And for what it's worth, even though the Airborne set up was super easy, no prior knowledge of bikes needed, I like my bike that much more because of it. It feels pretty cool to be able to set it up myself and get it dialed in just right.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 8iking VIIking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    703
    I bought an airborne goblin about a month ago and I love it so far. Give them a call or check out the airborne section of this forum for sizing info....the customer service is excellent

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    123
    Yeah, definitely impressed with airborne thus far. Their customer support seems fantastic from every indication I've got. As far not being able to try a bike before buying doesn't make it a deal-breaker for me. I've never got on a decent bike I didn't like

  8. #8
    'Tis but a scratch
    Reputation: huffster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,851
    You may read a lot of advice about fit. In my opinion, fit and geometry are the primary reason to buy something you can ride first. I happen to be 6'4". So far, I have always gone with XL size and have been able to "adjust" fit. Sometimes that requires a change of stem or other tweaking. You may not be a clear size. Someone who is 6'0" for example can fall toward L or XL.

    As for geometry, you will also miss out on the feel of different bikes based on things like seat tube angle and head tube angle, etc. You can ride bikes though and get an idea of what you like. You can then look up their geometry on-line for the most part. I.e. lets say you ride a Giant Trance, you can then go on-line to Giant's website and see the specs.

    A company like Airborne gives you the opportunity to look at their geometry on their website. So, now you can see if their geo is similar to what you like. Someone like Bikes Direct...not so much. For example, if you liked a Motobecane they had, it is not easy to find the geometry specs on-line.

    You also have the factor of putting the bike together. If you are reasonably mechanically inclined, then this should not scare you and you have the chance to learn more about your bike in the process.

    Personally, I am thinking about a Airborne Goblin. It is a well spec'd at a good price point. I just need to save up some dough.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    123
    Huffster, I can get my hands on some trek bikes and felt bikes that the lbs rents and get a feel for them and then compare the geometry and specs to the online bikes.

    Definitely want to get to a point where I can maintain my own rides, so the assembly is a positive aspect of the purchase for me. Thanks for the help, guys!

Similar Threads

  1. element BC online buying?
    By kaplanjoe in forum Rocky Mountain
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-20-2012, 05:56 PM
  2. What to ask when buying Reba online?
    By myersv in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-24-2012, 12:34 AM
  3. Buying a 2011 575 online
    By Pistol79 in forum Yeti
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-03-2011, 11:37 PM
  4. buying a SB66 online
    By tmasi in forum Yeti
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 10-14-2011, 03:00 AM
  5. Buying a Butcher online
    By M-80 Rider in forum Santa Cruz
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-01-2011, 06:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •