1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521

    New 29er - brakes rubbing

    I just got my Airborne Guardian today and got it mostly tuned up. However, the Tektro Hydros are rubbing enough to slow the wheel's rotation a bit. I can get it to rotate about a turn and a half before it stops due to the friction. I've tried the method where you loosen the bolts a bit and then hold the lever while tightening incrementally. That didn't work. I also tried the business card trick and that didn't work.

    So my question is, should I:

    A: Just take it for a ride and see if it gets better.

    B: Take it into the shop to have a pro look at it.

    C: Something else

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,458
    try putting a business card in the none moving side of the brake pad between the disc, and then grip the brake and tighten the caliper bolts. but don't pull too hard because of course its going to rub you're locking it into position on the rotor.

  3. #3
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    The problem is no matter how loose I make the caliper bolts, the rubbing still occurs.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,921
    edited......

    deleted info for mechanical brakes.
    Last edited by rlouder; 07-22-2012 at 09:45 PM.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joel63's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    94
    Get some time on them and re-adjust as needed. Just ride & use the brakes normal, don't hammer on them and build up a bunch of heat thinking that will break them in. That can cause the pads to get hard, they will have less stopping power and be noisy for the rest of their life.
    I'm not familiar with that caliper, sounds like it may be a single piston ? If so, find the manuel on- line, there must by an adjustment for the side opposite the piston.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,458
    if they are rubbing no matter what, your cable is too tight, or the inside (non moving) pad is too far out. either try bringing the non moving pad in, or loosening the cable so that the moving pad is not so close, then readjust with a business card between the non moving pad and the disc. you just have to learn how to set them up right, they normally don't come preadjusted out of the box.

  7. #7
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    It's a dual piston brake system. It looks like both pads are rubbing.

    The rotor is true, so the brakes are just too tight. I will try loosening the cable as soon as I can get my hands on a tool that will do it. Thanks for the tips.

  8. #8
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    I took the bike to a shop to get the brakes looked at. Right off the bat, one of the mechanics looked at me rudely and said, "If you don't figure out how to do this yourself, you're going to keep coming back over and over again." I'm not sure what the hell he was talking about because that was my first time being there in 4 years and the first time on this particular bike. Then he said I could bend it back. I said, "Bend WHAT back?" So then he reached down and touched my front rotor with his bare hand. I said the rotors are true, but got some wise comment in return. Then he said they couldn't even look at it until Wednesday. So yeah, I get it, you're busy. I'll just figure it out on my own.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,118
    Quote Originally Posted by Barheet View Post
    It's a dual piston brake system. It looks like both pads are rubbing.

    The rotor is true, so the brakes are just too tight. I will try loosening the cable as soon as I can get my hands on a tool that will do it. Thanks for the tips.
    If they are hydraulic brakes there will not be a cable to loosen.

    Some of my brakes will rub after doing the squeeze and tighten method. For those I manually line up the calipers by hand and spin the wheel listening for rub. Hold in place when you are happy with no rub and slowly tighten the bolts.

    It can be a pain.

    Just finished a new build in which I couldn't stop the rub on new slx brakes. Said f it and rode. After this ride, I realigned them and everything is perfect now. Some settling and seating of parts may have happened.

  10. #10
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    I trued the wheels since after my first ride and already notice a little bit of daylight between the outside pads and the rotor, so it looks like it's getting better. Thanks for the tips, I'll do another adjustment and think it will be ok.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,118
    Yup. Just keep trying and you'll learn and get good at it. Post up for further help. Stay away from lbs that treat you like the last one.

  12. #12
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    Ok I just went out to install my new pedals and now the rear brake is rubbing much harder. It will only turn about half a rotation if that. The bike has been sitting in the hot garage...any chance that expanded the brake fluid or something?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,118
    So they were ok before this? Weird. How hot is your garage. Damn.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,118
    Also you need to check the bike's mounting suraces to be sure they were faced, should be no paint at all!

    You will struggle until this is corrected.

  15. #15
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    Took the bike out for a 10 mile spin tonight and it performed really well. Brakes seem to have loosened up a bit. Guess I will just keep riding it and if it continues, give Airborne a call.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: faceplant72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by Barheet View Post
    Ok I just went out to install my new pedals and now the rear brake is rubbing much harder. It will only turn about half a rotation if that. The bike has been sitting in the hot garage...any chance that expanded the brake fluid or something?
    I have found the Tektro hydro pistons will shift to once side if the bike is left on its side. They recenter when you start riding. The automatic pad adjust seemed a little funking until I got ~200miles on the pads but since then I haven't had to touch them.

  17. #17
    no trees are safe
    Reputation: Millfox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    491
    You might want to push back the pistons. Sometimes when you change the pads the pistons are pushed too much out and they rub against rotors even if they're not in use. Just take out the pads, get the plastic lever you use for taking down the tyres and push the pistons inside. It helps me when I change my brake pads and the new ones are rubbing.

  18. #18
    FKA Malibu412
    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,399
    Sounds like the offending brake(s) need to be bled. This is indicated by the fact that it gets worse when the bike has been sitting in the heat. Air in the system will expand when warmed and push the pistons out more than just brake fluid. When you rode it in the evening, chances are the temp had dropped and the air in the system had contracted.

    Also, take it to a different shop than the one you have already visited. D o u c h e s.

    BTW, so much misinformation in this thread.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  19. #19
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    Sounds like the offending brake(s) need to be bled. This is indicated by the fact that it gets worse when the bike has been sitting in the heat. Air in the system will expand when warmed and push the pistons out more than just brake fluid. When you rode it in the evening, chances are the temp had dropped and the air in the system had contracted.

    Also, take it to a different shop than the one you have already visited. D o u c h e s.

    BTW, so much misinformation in this thread.
    Yeah I've heard that bleeding could help and that air expands more than the brake fluid, which could be part of the problem. I've also heard I could have too much fluid in the lines. Pushing back the pistons doesn't seem like it would work if there is air in the lines, but is air in the lines usually a problem on brand new bikes?

    I really don't want to take it to an LBS unless I absolutely have to. What's the point of buying online if I have to spend more to have it worked on? Part of the fun is figuring out how the bike works.

  20. #20
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    711
    Quote Originally Posted by Barheet View Post
    Yeah I've heard that bleeding could help and that air expands more than the brake fluid, which could be part of the problem. I've also heard I could have too much fluid in the lines. Pushing back the pistons doesn't seem like it would work if there is air in the lines, but is air in the lines usually a problem on brand new bikes?

    I really don't want to take it to an LBS unless I absolutely have to. What's the point of buying online if I have to spend more to have it worked on? Part of the fun is figuring out how the bike works.
    There should be no air at all in your hydraulic circuit. I can easily believe that you have air bubbles in a new hydraulic brake system. That is why you have to learn to bleed them. Do some research and learn how to purge all the air from your brakes.

  21. #21
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    521
    Alright, I ordered a bleed kit. Thanks for the tips, hope this works.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: aztrail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    45
    I have those brakes on my Rockhopper, and I experience both the rubbing and the changes due to temp. I live in AZ and the travel in the levers changes quite a bit after leaving the bike in my SUV or taking it out of a hot garage. It doesn't effect the performance though. Also, I had to pull the pads and give the brake pad spring a little bend to apply more pressure away from the rotor. That helped a lot!

    Like a previous post, I have the best luck with loosening the caliper bolts and spinning the wheel to judge where to tighen the caliper as opposed to squeezing the lever and tightening the bolts. But that is just me! PS, I have had this bike for 3 years and changed rotors (to 180) and changed pads and never had to bleed the lines!
    Toughen Up Buttercup

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •