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  1. #1
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    Needing to go clipless???

    Looking for a suggestion on a clipless set up. I ride mainly single track, some paths etc. I have a problem with the holes in my legs and the bruises from the spikes on my pedals.

    I used to ride clipless on road bikes, years ago, but never when i have to get my foot out FAST.. i'm not too concerned about the investment, but a few grams here or there does not matter to me, i have more weight to lose than my bike

    Any suggestions would be awesome..i'm tired of hitting a rooty accent and not being able to keep my feet on the pedals !

    and is that just me, and need more time in the saddle?? or will clipless help?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman30 View Post
    Looking for a suggestion on a clipless set up. I ride mainly single track, some paths etc. I have a problem with the holes in my legs and the bruises from the spikes on my pedals.

    I used to ride clipless on road bikes, years ago, but never when i have to get my foot out FAST.. i'm not too concerned about the investment, but a few grams here or there does not matter to me, i have more weight to lose than my bike

    Any suggestions would be awesome..i'm tired of hitting a rooty accent and not being able to keep my feet on the pedals !

    and is that just me, and need more time in the saddle?? or will clipless help?
    If you look around the beginner board there are so many threads n this you will never make it through all of them, and many pedals will get mention and recomended.

    Personally, I use Speedplay frogs. Not many people use them. They are incredibly easy to get in and out of. I can easily drop an inside foot in a corner and be back in by the end of the next pedal revolution after the turn, I can dab a foot very easily in technical sections.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  3. #3
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    That is what i am looking for, i will check them out, thanks very very much..

    yeah too much info out there to make sense of to be honest...thank you

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    Also check Time Atac. The Alium models are not expensive, and these are very simple solid pedals with a good positive click in/out.

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    How long have you been riding?
    I personally would recomend good flats and mtb shoes for a new biker. I did the whole get into clipless as soon as possible thing and the climbing was great but my descending skillset was just not there to be comfortable because I had to think about too many things. Once I put flats on my bike my skills skyrocketed. But somebody will come on and tell you the same about going to clipless early. The key to platforms is to keep you heel down and learn to feel your bike on your feet

  6. #6
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    Keeping your feet on flat pedals is a skill you can learn, assuming your pedals are of the nasty spike variety and your shoes are grippy. Many also use shin guards to reduce the bleeding...

    I've gone for Time ROC ATAC clipless pedals: they keep me on the pedals and give me some additional boost for singlespeeding up the hills.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  7. #7
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    Someone above mentioned getting good flat pedals and shoes. That brings up a good point. If you are going to stay with flats, get good pedals and shoes, they really make a difference.

    When comparing flats to clipless, you need to be choosing between good flats and good clipless. These are both really bad areas to skimp on. Clipless pedals that are hard to get in and out of will turn you off of clipless, and tennis shoes on small, cheap flats (like the one most cheaper bikes come stock with), while familiar, are not nearly as good in the rough as a good flat pedal with shoes designed for riding them.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #8
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    I currently am riding these shin choppers....i used to ride clipless but for street and like the ability to pull on the crank, it's really only been a matter on my single trac trails around me have lots of roots and rocks on uphill and that's when it bites me !

    i don't know how to put a pic here..they are Sun Ringle

    [Sun-Ringle Sun/Ringle Zu-Zu Pedals Pedal Reviews

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    I wear Shimano SPDs and I turn the tension all the way down so it's easy to clip out. I haven't had an issue yet (except when I forget and do a slow motion fall over)....the couple of at speed incidents where I needed to get out, I was able to, no problem.

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    i looked them up and man there are soooo many options...may have to see lbs to figure this out..until then i'll hit the trails with my meat ginders...

    the main reason i am asking is my son needs a good set of pedals, he is bigger and heaver than me, he's 6.3 275 and has bent his pedals a little that came on his trek 7.2..so i thought about putting these on his bike, not that he needs the spikes, but seem to be good heavy duty pedals and then me go clipless...he's no where near able to go clipless for any reason....and don't think he wants to....so i didn't want to drop 50 bucks on a set of pedals when i could use that for clipless for me and and put my set on his bike that will hold up until he drops weight.

    argh.....who knows

  11. #11
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    It irks me when someone asks about specifically going clipless, and someone has to pipe in with "good flat pedals and shoes." I am sorry, but it just is not the same. I don't care how much grip you think you have. If it is not physically connected to the pedal, it is simply not the same thing.

    Going flats and shoes is one thing, but please do not compare it to clipless.

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    My .02 cents...

    This is a true story:

    I went out riding with the local club, there were about two dozen people. I was the only one there with platform pedals. Everyone had question like, "why are you using those shoes/pedals?"

    Most of the guys/guys had nice bikes as this was an "intermediate" ride. A few of them had top of line bikes and had been riding for years...some going on these same rides since the late 80's.

    Halfway through we come to single log in the path. I'm guess it was about 18 to 24" inches high. Except me, every single rider unclipped, and carried their bike over the log. I pedal up to it at a medium speed, lifed the front wheel, and made it on top of the log. I dabbed for a second and rolled off.

    My point you ask?

    1. You do not need clipless pedals. Look at trial riders, there isn't anything they can't do.
    2. If you think you'd like clipless, great. I'd just make sure I had a good foundation of bike-handling skills so I wouldn't have to walk my bike over any logs. If you clip out and walk/carry because you're afraid of falling you won't improve. I don't think clipless pedals are good for beginning mountainbikers, even if you have used them for road riding.
    "I can only assume chan slap is what happens when you get assaulted by Jackie Chan. I don't think anybody can prevent that."

  13. #13
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    I ride with some riders who are more than average riders, and who have been riding most of their lives. Most don't feel the need to ride every stunt, myself included. I can clear most of the stunts on the local trail, but don't need to every single time.

    Clipless or platform, the same stunt can be ridden, the same way.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy Fluid View Post
    I ride with some riders who are more than average riders, and who have been riding most of their lives. Most don't feel the need to ride every stunt, myself included. I can clear most of the stunts on the local trail, but don't need to every single time.

    Clipless or platform, the same stunt can be ridden, the same way.
    Not what I said at all. Nobody said you had to ride every "stunt" every time.

    If you had read my post, 23 out of 24 riders WALKED their bikes over the log. The one who rode over the log had flats.

    I'll repeat myself; If beginners start on clipless pedals and clip out at challenges they will not gain experience, and therefore, not improve.
    "I can only assume chan slap is what happens when you get assaulted by Jackie Chan. I don't think anybody can prevent that."

  15. #15
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    So you are saying that NO ONE that was clipped in could ride it? I find that hard to believe. Did they simply choose not to?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    Not what I said at all. Nobody said you had to ride every "stunt" every time.

    If you had read my post, 23 out of 24 riders WALKED their bikes over the log. The one who rode over the log had flats.

    I'll repeat myself; If beginners start on clipless pedals and clip out at challenges they will not gain experience, and therefore, not improve.
    I learned to do logs on clipless.

    I know plenty of other people that do logs with clipless.

    The issue on your ride was that for most intermediate riders, a 24" log is pretty freakin huge. If there were a few average intermediate riders with you on flats, you would still have likely been the only one trying that log

    24" is pretty big. I'm one of the better people I know at getting over big logs, and I consider 24" a challenge that I will often not make.

    Also, on large group rides, for whatever reason, obstacles that can slow the group down often get skipped. Especially if the goal is to make good time. It is one of the reasons I don't like riding with large groups and/or people obsessed with making good time. I'll tend to hit all the obstacles, and next thing I know, I'm way off the back holding people up.

    I think you are reading way too much into the clipless part of that experience.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy Fluid View Post
    It irks me when someone asks about specifically going clipless, and someone has to pipe in with "good flat pedals and shoes." I am sorry, but it just is not the same. I don't care how much grip you think you have. If it is not physically connected to the pedal, it is simply not the same thing.

    Going flats and shoes is one thing, but please do not compare it to clipless.
    +1,000,000.

    A 24 inch log feature????? I just measured the armrest of my couch... 26 inches.
    Everyone glance over at the side of their couch.... that is one fairly humongous obstacle!

  18. #18
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    I've been riding the last couple week on Performance's MTX Forte pedal that is a nice pin/platform on one side and a SPD clip on the other side. Forté MTX Pedals - Bike Pedals / Cleats


    Strengths: Great platform or clip-less pedal as you see fit. I'll run clipped in 90% of the time, but I'll unclip for a technical section If I'm not confident or not willing to gamble on toppling over if I fail. Even the clipped side is tolerably comfortable to pedal on if you're not wearing the right shoes or you want to misplace your foot to prevent clipping. If you occasionally just hop on the bike for a ride to the 7-11 or for an evening spin around the neighborhood they're perfect; a pedal like the 540 is horrible to ride even short distances.

    Weakness: A little heavy (couple hundred grams). You have to "manage" which side of the pedal you're interested in using at any point in time, which would kill you in a race but is mostly just a matter of taking your foot off the pedal and letting the other pedal move the other side around for you. The form factor is much larger; I'm coming off of Shimano 540's and I'm still hitting a lot of rocks because I'm used to having less pedal down there.

    I intend to leave them on the bike for the foreseeable future as the benefits are obvious and the inconveniences are minimal.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy Fluid View Post
    It irks me when someone asks about specifically going clipless, and someone has to pipe in with "good flat pedals and shoes." I am sorry, but it just is not the same. I don't care how much grip you think you have. If it is not physically connected to the pedal, it is simply not the same thing.

    Going flats and shoes is one thing, but please do not compare it to clipless.
    You've compelled me to jump in here. You have to realize that while you are very sure about your stance that clipless does not compare to flats there are probably as many people who feel the opposite, that flats do compare. Just because it's your experience doesn't make someone else's viewpoint less valid, and vice-versa. Me claiming you need to stay on flats is no more or less valid than you claiming clipless is the only way, it's all opinion.

    I for one absolutely feel just as secure on my flats as I did on my clipless, the main difference is that I can easily get away from my bike if need be. My feet stay put just as well on flats as they did on clipless, the main advantage of clipless for me was the float back when my knees has some issues during pedaling.

    OP I know this wasn't supposed to be yet another clipless/flats battle thread but while you are shopping for new pedals, try riding with your heels down a bit while you aren't pedaling (i.e. downhills). I learned that from the "Fabian Barel AM Skills" video that was posted a while back on the AM forum. It creates an angular force which (assuming good pedals and shoes) keeps your feet on the pedals through bumps and airs. Jumps and bunny hops, you might want to point your toes down to pull the bike with you through the air. It's really helped my wife get much more comfortable on her bike and her feet don't pop off the pedals anymore which she is a big fan of.

    Once you're comfortable on your bike and on your trails then you should give clipless a try. It works great for some people and whatever makes you happy on your bike is what you should be riding. My suggestion for clipless is Time ATAC pedals, great mud shedding great float and really good retention. I've found that Crank Bros pedals like to eject my foot when I hit a rock with the pedals and SPD pedals work great but didn't have enough float for my weird legs. SPD is the best choice for entry level because you can get the multi-release cleats and pair them with the adjustable tension of almost all SPD pedals.

    One thing of note: don't believe the hype of either pedal, decide for yourself. Just because you ride flat pedals doesn't mean you are at a disadvantage in any way when you go uphill and just because you have clipless pedals doesn't mean you can't ride technical terrain. There's thousands of people out there proving either of those thoughts wrong as you read this. In the end, go with what makes you comfortable.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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    Allow me to retort...

    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy Fluid View Post
    So you are saying that NO ONE that was clipped in could ride it? I find that hard to believe. Did they simply choose not to?
    I do not know if "they could have," I simply know "they didn't." But all 23of them???? I found it hard to believe too, hence my post.

    Also I said the log was 18-24" to cover myself, as I didn't have a measuring tape with me. Notice how most only quote the larger number?

    Let me add, this was a regular course on their weekly ride, something they had been doing for years.

    FACT: People have died from crashing while clipped in to their pedals.

    The local race guys always tell me clipless is the only way to go. In the same breath they all say that they've crashed while clipped in, and suffered broken bones as a result. So it's worth it then

    Can you do any of the following while clipped in? This rider is not "physically connected to the bike," and it's not holding him back any...

    Danny MacAskill - "Way Back Home" - YouTube
    Last edited by thesenator; 09-21-2011 at 08:43 AM. Reason: spelling
    "I can only assume chan slap is what happens when you get assaulted by Jackie Chan. I don't think anybody can prevent that."

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman30 View Post
    I currently am riding these shin choppers....i used to ride clipless but for street and like the ability to pull on the crank, it's really only been a matter on my single trac trails around me have lots of roots and rocks on uphill and that's when it bites me !

    i don't know how to put a pic here..they are Sun Ringle

    [Sun-Ringle Sun/Ringle Zu-Zu Pedals Pedal Reviews
    I'll give you $20 for those pedals.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    I do not know if "they could have," I simply know "they didn't." But all 23of them???? I found it hard to believe too, hence my post.

    Also I said the log was 18-24" to cover myself, as I didn't have a measuring tape with me. Notice how most only quote the larger number?

    Let me add, this was a regular course on their weekly ride, something they had been doing for years.

    FACT: People have died from crashing while clipped in to their pedals.

    The local race guys always tell me clipless is the only way to go. In the same breath they all say that they've crashed while clipped in, and suffered broken bones as a result. So it's worth it then

    Can you do any of the following while clipped in? This rider is not "physically connected to the bike," and it's not holding him back any...

    Danny MacAskill - "Way Back Home" - YouTube
    Clipless is nice for easy single track stuff and/or crush gravel.

    I ride flats because I don't want to fall when I unexpectedly slip a tire on a root or bounce off a rock climbing.

    I did a race a few months ago that was very muddy as it had been raining all night into the morning. I watched people fall down left and right still clipped into their bike. I climbed right past those silly fools.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy Fluid View Post
    It irks me when someone asks about specifically going clipless, and someone has to pipe in with "good flat pedals and shoes." I am sorry, but it just is not the same. I don't care how much grip you think you have. If it is not physically connected to the pedal, it is simply not the same thing.

    Going flats and shoes is one thing, but please do not compare it to clipless.
    If you notice I did not say they are the same thing not by a longshot. I merely said if the OP is still a relatively new rider without a good base set of skills I recommended that he use flats until he has that skill-set then move to clipless.

    two completely different things

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    FACT: People have died from crashing while clipped in to their pedals.
    Since this has become some sort of awesome troll-fest, I'd like to see the proof to this claim.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  25. #25
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    Uhh

    We need to convince everyone in the Tour de France to switch out their pedals/shoes to BMX pedals and tennis shoes combo.

    Those teams will search to the ends of the earth for any way to gain speed/efficiency. Interesting that they have not "discovered" how incredible platform pedals + tennis shoes are. We really should notify them stat!!

    Hmmm...

    This clipless vs. flats debate has already occurred on MTBR in a big way.

    Essentially what it all boiled down to is the following:

    Try both and then decide for yourself. I know...crazy concept right??

    To OP: The answer is "yes". Clipless will keep your foot on the pedal over the roots you mentioned. It will be a tad more difficult to dismount if clipped in though..

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    We need to convince everyone in the Tour de France to switch out their pedals/shoes to BMX pedals and tennis shoes combo.

    Those teams will search to the ends of the earth for any way to gain speed/efficiency. Interesting that they have not "discovered" how incredible platform pedals + tennis shoes are. We really should notify them stat!!

    Hmmm...

    This clipless vs. flats debate has already occurred on MTBR in a big way.

    Essentially what it all boiled down to is the following:

    Try both and then decide for yourself. I know...crazy concept right??

    To OP: The answer is "yes". Clipless will keep your foot on the pedal over the roots you mentioned. It will be a tad more difficult to dismount if clipped in though..
    Mountain bikes = road bikes???

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman30 View Post
    Looking for a suggestion on a clipless set up. I ride mainly single track, some paths etc. I have a problem with the holes in my legs and the bruises from the spikes on my pedals.

    I used to ride clipless on road bikes, years ago, but never when i have to get my foot out FAST.. i'm not too concerned about the investment, but a few grams here or there does not matter to me, i have more weight to lose than my bike

    Any suggestions would be awesome..i'm tired of hitting a rooty accent and not being able to keep my feet on the pedals !

    and is that just me, and need more time in the saddle?? or will clipless help?
    Sorry to go off topic from everyone else but I'd like to step in and answer the OP....

    Clipless will definately help. I would look around for an inexpensive pedal to try. These are a good start as is the 540. Once you get a feel you can upgrade the pedal and sell these.

    Also dont forget the shoe. Personnaly I would suggest a shoe that does not just have velcro straps but one with a ratcheting top strap. Also make sure its breathable material. I would suggest These.

    Finally, I suggest buying at a LBS and trying on the shoe you are going to buy. I wear a 44 and I bought a 44 online and it didnt fit well. I have even tried shoes of the same size at the LBS and found those both fit differently.

    Good luck.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikebmx999 View Post
    Mountain bikes = road bikes???
    At an elite level, "yes". CX, Mtb, Road...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Needing to go clipless???-sid2.jpg  


  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    You've compelled me to jump in here. You have to realize that while you are very sure about your stance that clipless does not compare to flats there are probably as many people who feel the opposite, that flats do compare. Just because it's your experience doesn't make someone else's viewpoint less valid, and vice-versa. Me claiming you need to stay on flats is no more or less valid than you claiming clipless is the only way, it's all opinion.
    I never claimed clipless is the only way. It just annoys me when someone asks about going clipless, and the good flats/shoes suggestion comes up. If they were asking about better flat pedals and shoes, sure, suggest it, but when clipless is suggested, is it necessary to advise them on something that it is not the same?

    I for one absolutely feel just as secure on my flats as I did on my clipless, the main difference is that I can easily get away from my bike if need be. My feet stay put just as well on flats as they did on clipless, the main advantage of clipless for me was the float back when my knees has some issues during pedaling.
    Everyone will have a different experience with them. For me, and the riding that I do, flats, no matter how "good" they are, will not connect me to the bike, and give me the feeling of being connected like clipless will.

    OP I know this wasn't supposed to be yet another clipless/flats battle thread but while you are shopping for new pedals, try riding with your heels down a bit while you aren't pedaling (i.e. downhills). I learned that from the "Fabian Barel AM Skills" video that was posted a while back on the AM forum. It creates an angular force which (assuming good pedals and shoes) keeps your feet on the pedals through bumps and airs. Jumps and bunny hops, you might want to point your toes down to pull the bike with you through the air. It's really helped my wife get much more comfortable on her bike and her feet don't pop off the pedals anymore which she is a big fan of.
    This is good advice.

    Once you're comfortable on your bike and on your trails then you should give clipless a try. It works great for some people and whatever makes you happy on your bike is what you should be riding. My suggestion for clipless is Time ATAC pedals, great mud shedding great float and really good retention. I've found that Crank Bros pedals like to eject my foot when I hit a rock with the pedals and SPD pedals work great but didn't have enough float for my weird legs. SPD is the best choice for entry level because you can get the multi-release cleats and pair them with the adjustable tension of almost all SPD pedals.

    One thing of note: don't believe the hype of either pedal, decide for yourself. Just because you ride flat pedals doesn't mean you are at a disadvantage in any way when you go uphill and just because you have clipless pedals doesn't mean you can't ride technical terrain. There's thousands of people out there proving either of those thoughts wrong as you read this. In the end, go with what makes you comfortable.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    At an elite level, "yes".
    Which clearly the OP is at.....


    I ride flats on my xc bike and clipless on my CX bike. Two different animals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman30 View Post
    Looking for a suggestion on a clipless set up. I ride mainly single track, some paths etc. I have a problem with the holes in my legs and the bruises from the spikes on my pedals.

    I used to ride clipless on road bikes, years ago, but never when i have to get my foot out FAST.. i'm not too concerned about the investment, but a few grams here or there does not matter to me, i have more weight to lose than my bike

    Any suggestions would be awesome..i'm tired of hitting a rooty accent and not being able to keep my feet on the pedals !

    and is that just me, and need more time in the saddle?? or will clipless help?
    Clipless will help...

    I would go Shimano with Shimano shoes....low cost works great....some shoes can have interference problems....

    Set the release point to minimum....I still ride on minimum after 6 years.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikebmx999 View Post
    Which clearly the OP is at.....


    I ride flats on my xc bike and clipless on my CX bike. Two different animals.
    Haha...ok... It's all good. Just ride...

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Since this has become some sort of awesome troll-fest, I'd like to see the proof to this claim.
    I think he is right. Clearly people have died riding clipless. People have died doing just about anything you can imagine. The issue here is causation, and frequency. Which I think one will have a hard time establishing in any meaningful way.

    I would not bother spending too much time arguing with someone who makes such a broad conclusion (that clipless prevents you from trying and/or developing log-hopping skills) from a single, large group ride consisting of intermediate riders. It has already been explained that depending on the group dynamic on these rides, that sort of stuff is often skipped, even by people who can do it. He has confused correlation (based on a single group ride) with causation.

    My own experience, and the observations of all the people I ride with (clipless and flat riders) over the past 12 years refutes both his correlation, and the idea of a causal relationship.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  34. #34
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    Halfway through we come to single log in the path. I'm guess it was about 18 to 24" inches high. Except me, every single rider unclipped, and carried their bike over the log. I pedal up to it at a medium speed, lifed the front wheel, and made it on top of the log. I dabbed for a second and rolled off.
    How did you see what all 23 other riders did? I could not tell you what a person 5 positions ahead does, and have no idea about the folks behind me.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  35. #35
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    I've crashed hard twice this year. Both time going about 17 mph. I'm trying to imagine how easy it would be to put a foot down while moving fairly fast!?! In both of my crashes I unclipped without issue. Putting a foot down really wouldn't help.
    Last weekend 40 mile MT Bike race the most serious issue was a broken ankle from a guy who put his foot down while the bike was sliding out on a high speed grassy turn. Foot grabbed the ground and the he kept going....EMT speculated if he stayed clipped in he would have been fine.

    Clippless pedals don't cause the crash. Flats may help with putting a foot down on slow technical stuff. Did flats cause riders to fall in a mud puddle? Interesting. I'd blame the tires. 18" log? yikes! My bike hass 13" of clearance. At some point the chainring is going to hit that log hard unless you bunny hop it and/or have some above average technical skills. Maybe I'm picturing it wrong.
    Would flats help confidence in gaining skills at slow speeds? Possibly. Do clippless pedals hold riders back from doing any technical area? Doubtful for most, but maybe for learning new skills. Would flat help for putting a foot down at speed? nope. Can't see how it would help. Having a nice stiff carbon like sole for long rides is really nice.

  36. #36
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    Wow didn't know this was a hot subject. Lol. I can bunny hope about a foot without leaving the pedals. Sounds like my technique on the uphill root areas. I just was used to riding clipped on ROAD BIKE. Seeming like MTB is different animal with clipless.
    Also I'm not in skate or MTB shoes. Think that may help. Used to skate too and know the difference in how much the shoes make but never thought about it with this.

    But being clipped in has worried me some as I learn what I can and can't do. I am bread winner and don't need broken bones! Clipped or not! Tbh

  37. #37
    KVW
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    Can you do any of the following while clipped in? This rider is not "physically connected to the bike," and it's not holding him back any...

    Danny MacAskill - "Way Back Home" - YouTube
    Jesus christ, that video was breathtaking.
    Thanks for sharing!

    I wear skate shoes regularly (i'm a longboarder) so I really hate the idea of buying bicycling shoes just to ride my bike. I usually dislike their look as well.
    Anyway, I'm just getting in to mtb'ing and my current compromise is with flats with power grips installed.

    Theoretically, I'll get the benefits of flats without the slipping off and destroying my shins. I know my pedaling efficiency won't be *quite* as good as actual clipless pedals, but like i said, it's my happy medium. Pedals should arrive this weekend so we'll see. Eventually I may choose a side.

  38. #38
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    Crank Brothers at 15 degree position, fast to engage and release - cow-tipped a few times early on but you get used to it after a few rides.
    Mike - PBG, FL
    2011 Specialized SJ Comp 29 Carbon
    2011 Specialized RH Comp 29
    2011 Gary Fisher Wahoo

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesenator View Post
    FACT: People have died from crashing while clipped in to their pedals.
    FACT: people have got seriously injured from crashing while using flat pedals. I don't have death statistics.

    (no, that does not stop me from riding bikes with pedals)

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  40. #40
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    Every one says good things about platforms and a pair of Five Tens. I have yet to find a pair of their shoes that I like. I can't wear the 'skater' shoes, they make my feet hurt and all of the others look just like the shoes I've been wearing.

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