1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    Mitch
    Reputation: Duffo's Avatar
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    Need some advise please

    Hi

    I'm currently riding a Transition Preston FR in more of a XC setup. Having a bit of trouble on the climbs as it would seem that with the seat post raised- the front wheel seems to be sketchy and it is almost impossible to complete a "steep" climb without losing balance. With the seat post lowered, I am surprisingly able to climb easily but at the expense of my knees.

    So I thought of getting an adjustable seatpost but it seems like the options are limited considering the preston's unusual seat post size. On top of that, the amount of money that I'm going to spend on the seat post is almost equivalent to changing the bike. I'm just wondering and need some advise here, seeing that I mostly ride XC and I'm not much of a downhill/hardcore rider, should I sell the bike and get an XC bike or should I just adjust by getting the gravity dropper ?

    Would appreciate all sorts of advise as I'm totally bummed out by this decision making right now

    P.S. The "XC" bike I'm thinking of getting is the BMC trailfox or a KTM lycan or a Titus. Though comparing the geometry of the trailfox to the preston, it would seem almost similar so I'm really wondering if the climbing would be any more efficient by changing bikes.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
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    By sketchy do you mean your wheel is lifting? If it is lean your body forward when going up hill. You move you weight from the back to the front.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  3. #3
    Mitch
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    Yup it is extremely wayward on the climbs though I lean forward as much as I can. Funny enough, I don't hv to lean forward as much when my seat post is down low. In fact it feels pretty slack except for the knee busting

  4. #4
    Mitch
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    I mean wayward and also the front wheel lifts up

  5. #5
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    Reputation: TwoHeadsBrewing's Avatar
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    I move as far forward as I can for climbing, and put just enough weight on the back wheel for good traction. Otherwise, if I hit a really big bump while I'm hammering down on the pedals that front wheel WILL come off the ground and mess up my balance. Also, more weight on the front tire helps me keep on the right line, instead of wandering around on the trail.

    Just my 2 cents here. I don't think there is a one "right" way to do it, and you have to find the way that works for you. I wouldn't lower the seat though, that's just asking for a blown out knee in a few years. You should be able to adjust your balance just fine by getting over the bars more and/or standing up on the pedals. Oh yeah, and try shifting to a harder gear and pedaling a slower cadence up the hills. If that doesn't give you more stability then use a granny gear and spin away. I employ both methods depending on the grade and distance of the climb.

  6. #6
    MTB skillz = NADA
    Reputation: GrayBeard Pirate's Avatar
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    Might want to look into some climbing bars. If installed properly, they can get your weight evened out on the steep climbs without making you get out of the saddle.
    Since I don't like writing, I don't have a blog to pimp. This space for rent.

  7. #7
    Mitch
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    Thanks for the advice, so I guess it all boils down to technique which I'm currently lacking, lol. I guess I will skip the idea of an adjustable seatpost then. Another question if I may, how does an "xc" bike actually make it easier to climb ? Geometry affects handling ?

    Hm climbing bars? Sounds interesting, are they like bar ends ?

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