1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Need some advice on upgrades.

    I have a 2006 Gary Fisher Tassajara Disc. I have been thinking about purchasing a new bike, but I see nothing wrong with my bike, except some of the components could be improved upon. The only change I made was some Kenda Tires, and some Easton Carbon Handle Bars. The bike, size XL, weighs 30.5lbs. My question is, what will give me the best bang for the buck on an upgrade? New Fork, Wheelset, etc??

    Here are the Factory Specs:

    Gold Series 6061 T6 aluminum
    Manitou Axel Platinum Air w/TPC, 100mm travel
    Aluminum/magnesium, single crown

    Hayes Sole XC brakes, Hayes Sole XC levers
    Shift Levers
    Shimano M-511 Deore
    Front Derailleur
    Shimano FD-M510 Deore
    Rear Derailleur
    Shimano M-571 LX
    Crankset
    Bontrager Select, 22/32/44 teeth
    Pedals
    Shimano PD-M505
    Bottom Bracket
    TruVativ GIGA pipe
    BB Shell Width
    Unspecified
    Rear Cogs
    9-speed, 11 - 34 teeth
    Chain
    Shimano CN-HG73, 1/2 x 3/32"
    Seatpost
    Bontrager Sport
    Saddle
    Bontrager Select ATB
    Handlebar
    Bontrager Crowbar Sport
    Handlebar Stem
    Bontrager Sport
    Headset
    1 1/8" threadless Aheadset

    Wheels
    Hubs
    Shimano M525 disc
    Rims
    Bontrager Ranger Disc
    Tires
    26 x 2.25" Bontrager Jones XR
    Spoke Brand
    Stainless steel, 14ga. (2.0mm) straight gauge

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Usually taking off rotating weight has the best return. Tires(done but check) and wheelset especially the front help steering, climbing and acceleration. Weigh what you have seperately if possible and go from there. Building a pair of wheels is easy with Park TM-1 tensioning tool .And it saves. A lighter fork could save 1-1.5lbs. but costs. The seatpost and saddle are usually heavy. The crankset to SLX or XT is a good weight reducer at $100-150.

  3. #3
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    Thank you very much!

  4. #4
    I like bacon... (clyde)
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    Why are you thinking about buying a new bike? Is something in particular bothering you about this one? Weight?

    Just wondering because I have a somewhat similar bike, 08 Trek 6500. I got lucky on a warranty replacement fork (Tora to Reba), and I have a new wheelset on its way.

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpyderPride View Post
    Why are you thinking about buying a new bike? Is something in particular bothering you about this one? Weight?

    Just wondering because I have a somewhat similar bike, 08 Trek 6500. I got lucky on a warranty replacement fork (Tora to Reba), and I have a new wheelset on its way.

    --
    Sent from my Droid Incredible 4G LTE using Tapatalk 2.
    I think I have a case of upgraditis. Probably the weight of the bike, and just to learn more about anything new on the market. But, I have not ridden in a while ... and I should be the one loosing the weight first!!!

    I posted in the clydesdale forum too ... about the changing terrain (more pavement, dirt roads) that I will be riding. A cyclecross bike was recommended ... but I would need to save some more $ for that. With that said, I'm gonna stick with the GF for the time being. Hope that makes sense.

  6. #6
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    New bike vs upgrade.

    Its almost always better if you want to upgrade to buy a whole bike. A cross bike might be a good idea but I would steer clear of it if you are doing any real trails. They are good for bike paths and smooth dirt roads.

    You current ride would really benifit as others have mentioned from a good set of wheels. Jenson usa has XT wheelsets on sale for around $300. The XT's are quite a bit lighter then what you have now and tubeless.. Only 200ish grams heavier then the lightest wheels on the market for half the price. After that you next biggest gain in performance is going to come from a fork swap. Again Jenson was advertising a roc shox sale of 50% off msrp. Maybe you could get a reba for 300-400. Upgrading part by part gets expensive fast. Take a look at ebay 26 inch wheel hardtails have become about the least popular bike in america which means they are selling cheap used. You can probaly get a 23-24 lb hardtail from 2 or 3 years ago that retailed for 2500-3000 for 1000-1200 now. Look into the cost of parts and you will find that its east to spend 1000 on upgrades and still have lots of low end stuff.
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  7. #7
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    Back in 2002/2003 when I wanted to "upgrade" my bike I did two things. First was to get new fork. My original was an elastomer fork and was ok at best. So I bought a new fork and put it on.

    Then when I wanted to upgrade again I considerd my options, but since my main go was weight reduction I decided on a new bike. However since I could not find a bike built the way I wanted it I simply bought a nice light frame and then all my components. I went from a 28lbs hardtail with basic compnents to a 23lbs hardtail with XT level components. Since my fork was only a year old at the time I used it and put my old one back on the old bike. I kept the old bike as spare / friend bike.

    I felt it was not good money to upgrade little bits and pieces here and there. Better to start fresh. I am happy I did. Since then I have not upgraded my bike at all. I have changed tires and have started to fool around with stem length, but those are tweaks not really upgrades. I also started using clipless pedals on the old bike, but again.. Tweak not a real upgrade.

    So that means that I ride on 26" wheels and V-brakes witha 3x9 set-up with 11-34 cassette. When I upgraded I got a lighter bike, but it did not make me a super rider.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  8. #8
    I like bacon... (clyde)
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamITR View Post
    I think I have a case of upgraditis. Probably the weight of the bike, and just to learn more about anything new on the market. But, I have not ridden in a while ... and I should be the one loosing the weight first!!!

    I posted in the clydesdale forum too ... about the changing terrain (more pavement, dirt roads) that I will be riding. A cyclecross bike was recommended ... but I would need to save some more $ for that. With that said, I'm gonna stick with the GF for the time being. Hope that makes sense.
    Well, what I am doing right now is fitting my old wheels with slicks and the new wheels (SLX/Mavic 717) with whatever knobbies suit the current trail conditions. So if I need to go for a road ride I can just switch out the wheels, lockout the fork and have something fairly efficient for that.

    You have a good frame, and like everyone is saying, you get the most cost effective performance increases from the biggest parts on your bike: tires, wheels, and fork, in that order. Other than that, making sure it fits like a glove and is well tuned and maintained is usually the most important.

    --
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    Bike: '08 Trek 6500
    Color: Oreo
    Delicious...

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Road bike. Trainer. Working fewer hours and fitting in another long ride mid-week.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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