1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Need opinions on this spec list for a Motobecane...

    I've been researching Motobecane bikes recently, and I found this new 2013 Motobecane 450HT model on the bikesdirect.com website.

    I'm not great with identifying parts, so I was wondering if someone could take a look at these components and give me an opinion on them:

    Frame: Custom 7005 Aluminum Trail-Tuned POWER STAY frame
    Fork: Longer Travel SR Suntour SF12-XCT-V4-DS-26-100mm
    Front Derailleur: SRAM FD-3.0-A1 TOP PULL
    Rear Derailleur: SRAM X4 long cage
    Brakes: TEKTRO Novela Mechanical Disc Brakes
    Crankset: SUNTOUR XCT-V3 22/32/42T
    Shifters: SRAM X4, 8 Speed Triggershift (24 speeds total)

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    crash test dummy
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    They're all entry level parts. I've got similar components on my Specialized Hardrock which I bought on sale for less than $400. It's not THAT big of a deal compared to what you can get in a name brand dealer.
    That said for a first MTB it's a decent bike. If you're like me though you'll be looking to upgrade in before too long. I demo'ed some top-end giants last fall which kind of ruined me.

  3. #3
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    hardrock's now are closer to 600 with tax from what i've read on here lately, so to get that for 320 shipped, definitely a good deal. its half the price and the exact same parts for the most part. hell, it has 8 speeds in the back instead of 7. so an extra gear, saving 280, not a bad deal.

  4. #4
    crash test dummy
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    Sorry, hadn't checked the new prices, plus mine was on sale. It's a nice component set which will hold up well to a novice rider. I bought a road bike for my fiance from BikesDirect and her dad got a widsor mtb from them. Both have been great bikes so I've got nothing but good things to say about them. My next bike will likely be from BD.

  5. #5
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    If you are new to the sport I suggest you begin shopping for a Bike Shop.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  6. #6
    nOOb
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    Just comparing parts if you wanted to spend a little more on a bike you could get a better fork and better brakes on the Airborne Skyhawk Airborne Bicycles. Skyhawk

    or if you wanted to spend a little less there's the Airborne Sabre Airborne Bicycles. Sabre

    With their free shipping in July promo they got nice deals.

    Not knocking BD just throwing out options.
    '09 Cannondale F7
    '00 Specialized Hardrock Comp

  7. #7
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    the sabre is 20 dollars less, with parts that are 2 step below the 450ht.

  8. #8
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    You'll be happy with the 450HT or one of the Airborne's. All are decent bikes for the price. If you aren't familiar with tuning up the brakes & derailleurs and aren't keen to learn, you'll definitely want to stick with purchasing from a bike shop.

    If you're comfortable putting in the effort and time before riding to get the bike tip top then you can go any route: mail order, craigslist, or a LBS.

    Get a good starter level bike. I usually advise against spending more than $500-750 on your first bike. If you are anything like me, you'll end up doing a good bit of thrashing the bike learning to ride technically. I'd prefer to do that on an entry level bike and upgrade to a nicer bike later than start out thrashing a nicer bike with n00b riding mistakes...
    09 Norco Fluid 2 | 10 Trek Fuel EX 8 | 12 Airborne Guardian

  9. #9
    nOOb
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    the sabre is 20 dollars less, with parts that are 2 step below the 450ht.
    True. Just throwing out options.
    '09 Cannondale F7
    '00 Specialized Hardrock Comp

  10. #10
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    yeah i was surprised at how crappy it was lol they need to step up their game

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    yeah i was surprised at how crappy it was lol they need to step up their game
    I think the Skyhawk and Guardian are where they step up their game.

  12. #12
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    i mean in the lower price point area. its easy to put top end components on an expensive bike, the hard part is really finding a way to put decent components on a lower priced bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    i mean in the lower price point area. its easy to put top end components on an expensive bike, the hard part is really finding a way to put decent components on a lower priced bike.
    The Skyhawk is $400, I wouldn't call that expensive.

  14. #14
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    and bikes direct did it for 80 cheaper. thats my point.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    and bikes direct did it for 80 cheaper. thats my point.
    No quite. The Skyhawk components are slightly better than the 450HT components. The Airborne Sabre is closer to the 450HT I believe. The Skyhawk has hydraulic brakes for one.

  16. #16
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    You're right, i'm not saying that they are completely equal, but they are relatively close. But for the 300 dollar range, thats where I think airborne should step up their game, that's all. They're both nice bikes for the money, don't get me wrong. They're a lot cheaper than what you'd find at an lbs. I'm a huge fan of saving money, and getting the most for what you spend.

  17. #17
    Airborne Product Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    But for the 300 dollar range, thats where I think airborne should step up their game, that's all.
    The Sabre is the best bike we could make for the $$ and still sell it at enough of a meager profit margin that lets us keep our doors open and keep the lights on. With the free freight promo we are running at the moment we are actually losing money on each Sabre sold.

    If you are better at negotiating with suppliers and product management than our Product Manager, maybe you should look at getting a job in the bike industry, LOL.
    Airborne Dude.

  18. #18
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    TOUCHE!

    There's a reason for multiple "price points" and Product Managers are always tasked with trade-offs in order to deliver a solid product within the parameters they must work under.

    A bike purchase is much more than the sum of components. If one is purchasing online, the ease of communicating and the level of support one receives from the company should factor into the final decision.

    It makes sense, at least to me, to stick with pointing out the different options that are available as far as bikes and refrain from providing business advice. The companys that "understand" will provide options for as many price points as they can.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  19. #19
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    For that budget. I'd spend about 10 hour my time score used bike deal

    sent from one of my 4 gold leafed iphone4s's

  20. #20
    Goon de Saint Goonery
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    You can't beat the support of a good LBS.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apache249 View Post
    You can't beat the support of a good LBS.
    you can still pay for that no matter where you get your bike from.

  22. #22
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    to the OP. Be prepared spend hours building and adjusting your bike, or paying a LBS for it.
    how much work to expect when buying a BD bike

  23. #23
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    Allow me, a new BD 450HT owner, to jump in with a few observations. Hey, I buy bikes infrequently, my main MTB until now has been a moderately ridden, well maintained, stock, '89 Fisher AL-1 ($550 23 years ago)!

    I like my orange 19.5" 450 very much. Frame is nicely made. Paint is awesome. It went together in under an hour. Brakes and shifters took some minor adjusting. Shifting with the SRAM parts is crisp. The threadless headset came installed, and the factory adjustment was fine. Wheels were OK out of the box, but I'll expect to true them after a bit. I'd rate assembly as 'painless' for a non-bike-geek, but handy, guy like me.

    Handling is quicker than the ancient AL-1, and a really nice change. Did I mention I like this $320 bike?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonbear View Post
    Allow me, a new BD 450HT owner, to jump in with a few observations. Hey, I buy bikes infrequently, my main MTB until now has been a moderately ridden, well maintained, stock, '89 Fisher AL-1 ($550 23 years ago)!

    I like my orange 19.5" 450 very much. Frame is nicely made. Paint is awesome. It went together in under an hour. Brakes and shifters took some minor adjusting. Shifting with the SRAM parts is crisp. The threadless headset came installed, and the factory adjustment was fine. Wheels were OK out of the box, but I'll expect to true them after a bit. I'd rate assembly as 'painless' for a non-bike-geek, but handy, guy like me.

    Handling is quicker than the ancient AL-1, and a really nice change. Did I mention I like this $320 bike?
    I couldn't agree more! I got the exact same bike and very happy w/it!
    2013 Cannondale Trail SL 3

    "You will never ride alone"

  25. #25
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    hmm good to know

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