1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Jun 2008
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    Need help converting my Mountain Bike

    Hey everyone (first post!),

    To keep it short, I bought a 2000 Raleigh M-80 off of craigslist for $100. I don't know if I scored a good deal, but so far, I am in love with this bike!! The frame is amazing, it was built well, very light for $100 (it's even lighter than my friend's steel road bike). I mainly use this bike to commute to my classes on campus. I am a complete newbie in the bike world (I am a drummer at heart with a side of rock climbing) so I would greatly appreciate ya'lls help. I want to modify my bike to be a commuter. I guess what I'm asking are things I can buy or do to make my bike lighter and ride better/smoother. I have a minimal budget ~$300-400ish but I would like to hear all the options available for my bike. I'd rather spend that much to improve the ride quality/speed/looks of my bike than spending equally as much (or more!!) for a parking spot on campus plus the gas.

    Thanks!!
    Hopefully this picture will work. If not, I'll try posting some pictures later

  2. #2
    I am a pathetic rider...
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    Sep 2007
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    If your campus is anything like the campuses around here, spending any extra money on a bike is a bad idea, the nicer the bike looks the faster you will be without it. some cheap and not too theft prone upgrades are slick or semi slick commuter tires, a rigid fork will keep the thing maintenance free, I would also go single speed on a commuter, less maintenance and less bling. But prior to any upgrades I would invest in the best lock you can find.
    Save the Earth, Ride a Cyclist

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Thanks for the quick response b4 stealth! I don't live on campus so I don't store my bike on the bike rails (or whatever they're called). For that very reason on theft, I keep it indoors. I have heard and seen some really nice bikes gone due to it being accidentally left near campus buildings or someone who has a good eye near the dorms.

    I already invested in a nice thick chain link with a masterlock. I don't really trust the bike locks that are available in our town.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Get some slicks and a rack and panniers and you're set.

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