1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    11

    need help buying the right tires for MTB. new rider

    Got Station in Korea and one day decided to try MTB, so I rented a Trek 3500 from the mwr, fell in love with the sport, shortly I decided to buy a use bike so i purchased a 2010 Trek 6500 slr (hardtail) it climbs like a goat!!! , a few days ago while heading downhill on some rocks I ripped the sidewall of the tires(Bontrage Jones acx 26x2.2). I am interested on buying the Botrage FR4 26x2.35 but the options I have are tubeless or clincher. well i know I dont have tubeless, but dont know what clincher really is? and will they be able to fit my bike? I do know i have a tube and tire right know. open for better brand suggestions and a clear defenition of clincher and are they going to fit my bike? Than you!!

  2. #2
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,349
    Clincher is standard tire. It'll be fine.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  3. #3
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,349
    Also, search the forum to make sure your rim and frame can handle that size tire.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,510
    Stick a fatter tire up front, assuming it fits between your fork. Any standard 26" MTB tire is a "clincher". Most MTB'ers typically run 2.25"-2.35" wide up front... maybe 2.4", and 2.0"-2.25" in the back. Bigger tire up front will help absorb the hits, and be a little more flat resistant. The smaller tire in the rear gives lower rolling resistance.

    Certain tires with textured sidewalls (e.g. Schwalbe Snake Skin sidewalls, or the sidewalls on the Tioga Psycho Genius) are designed specifically for sidewall tears while compromising on weight or something else.

    Tread-wise, it'll depend on the type of terrain you're riding on.

    -S

  5. #5
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,029
    There are essentially two types of tires, clincher and tubular. Tubular tires resemble the tube that goes inside of your current tire; they are closed and hold air without needing to be attached to a rim. In order to mount a tubular tire you need to glue it onto the rim. Tubular tires are much more common on road bikes (but aren't really very popular there anymore either) and are sometimes also called "sew-ups". Clincher tires are open on one side and will not hold air without being attached to a rim. They have a bead which locks (or "clinches") onto the rim during inflation allowing the tire to remain attached without glue.

    Currently there are three main categories of clincher tires: tubed, tubeless ready, and tubeless. Tubed tires require the use of a tube for inflation. Tubeless tires do not require tubes and are built with a rubber barrier in the construction of the tire so that they hold air. Tubeless ready tires (there are many variants in what the manufacturers call this type of construction) can be inflated without tubes but will require a sealant in order to retain air pressure because these tires are built without the air retaining rubber liner of tubeless tires.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  6. #6
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    Endorphin Junkie
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,273
    It looks like this question has already been answered by everyone above. Tubless tire would have an even thicker sidewall than a standard clincher, but the clincher and tubeless tire would work.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  7. #7
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,349
    Just as a point of clarification: There are tires rims specifically designed for tubeless and are often labeled "UST." Youcan learn more here: Bicycle wheel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  8. #8
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,510
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    It looks like this question has already been answered by everyone above. Tubless tire would have an even thicker sidewall than a standard clincher, but the clincher and tubeless tire would work.
    ...I hesitate to recommend going tubless since we don't know what wheels the OP has, and if he knows how to or is comfortable with converting a standard rim to tubless. The OP, being new to MTB, I would assume no on that, and so I avoided "the talk".

    -S

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •