1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    need help building a new full suspension bike

    Greetings,

    first, i want to say i am new to all of this and new in this forum. i have been scouring the internet for best items for a new bike. i have seen some few from chainreactioncycle. will Brand-X FS-1 7075 Alloy Frame and Rock Shox Tora SL Coil Forks be compatible with each other? or are they good combination? i am quite in a small budget and just want a simple full suspension bike and then upgrade soon.

    plus what tools do i need in building them, i have seen some few vids on how to assemble the headset and bottom bracket already, i hope i am making a sense here, if anyone can help me. sorry for the trouble, thank you in advance. i guess this is a wonderful forums for everyone who are beginners for bikes.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Kaba Klaus's Avatar
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    Don't build up your own bike - unless you have gained significant experience as a bike mechanic (e.g. doing you own maintenance). Unless you are really an experienced mechanic as well as a savy and patient buyer the bike you build will be more expensive than buying a stock model. The lower your budget, the more difficult it is to beat the price of a stock bike. Parts are most inexpensive when they come as a complete bike from a reputable brand that sells thousands of bikes. For obvious economic reasons bike companies get the best possible price on current equipment.

    Upgrading is an expensive game. If possible save a bit longer and buy right away what you need (or close to it). Upgrade only when you replace. Otherwise you pay for the same part twice.

    Brand-X FS-1 Frame and a specific fork are not compatible with each other. First, the frame's geometry and intended use may or may not meet the fork's purpose. Making a mistake here results in a poor handling bike. Second, the fork may or may not fit you. The coil spring in the fork may or may not fit your weight. Third, steerer tubes now come in 1.5", 1 1/8" and tapered. Frame, fork and headset need to be bought in a combination that fit each other.

    To build a bike you need quite a few special tools. Bottom bracket tool, star nut setter, crown race setter, tube cutter, chain tool, cassette tool, ... If you use the tools only once or twice, it isn't economic to buy them.

    Buy a bike from a shop. Look for 2009/2008 models. Nothing big happened int he last 2 years. Previous year models are often price reduced.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  3. #3
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    Greetings,

    that;s a great advice, i have learned something from there. however, i may have a small experience in bike mechanic, as i have changed/modified already some of my stock bike parts that i bought from amazon. i live in tokyo, and in my place there's no good bicycle shop that i can go.

    i want to upgrade the frame of my stock bike with just a little money i can spend on if possible, then the fork too. and i guess the Brand-X FS-1 will do it. if there's a good place that i can buy(where i think is in online only), for a Fork and headset for Brand-X FS-1 frame. i have other components already from my stock bike right now. just the frame and fork.

    thank you very much for the help

  4. #4
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    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
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    I took a look at the frame on chainreactioncycles.com. There is no indication as to the fork travel that the frame is designed for. Thus, there is not enough information given on the site to answer your question. We have no way of knowing whether your fork would be a good match for the frame. (We also do not know the travel of your current fork).

    I tend to agree w/Kaba. Your first time building a bike will incur a certain amount of what I refer to as "tuition". You'll need to buy tools. You'll probably want a book or two. You'll make mistakes. You might buy some wrong parts. You'll get frustrated sometimes. You might have to pay a bike shop to do some of the work. Etc.

    In the long run, building is fun. Knowing how to move parts around and do all your own work can save money -- in the long run.

    What bike are you riding now?

  5. #5
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    Greetings,

    thank you for having the time looking around, i appreciate that. yeah i got lots of mistakes while modifying my bike, i had modified my bike to an IS capable disk brake for rear. and a 9 speed cassette too. here's my bike.


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