1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
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    My rear Suspension Problem??

    Hello i recently been having some trouble with my rear suspension. well the shock is stuck at the lowest position. i have been trying diffrent things but i have no idea what i am doing i think it might have something to do with the rebound knob but i dont know
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  2. #2
    pronounced may-duh
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    I think that needs to be sent back to rock shock to be fixed.

  3. #3
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    Oh, yeah, to say the least...

    Quote Originally Posted by Maida7
    I think that needs to be sent back to rock shock to be fixed.

    It's what happens when the owner's manual isn't followed, and I suspect that's what's happened here. From Rock Shox:

    MA I N T E N A N C E
    After Every 8 Hours of Riding
    • Clean your shock with mild soap and a toothbrush. Keep the body clean and lubricated.
    • Never use a high-powered washer to clean the shock.
    • Keep mounting hardware clean and lubricated. Refer to your bicycle’s owner’s manual for correct mounting hardware torque values. Also be sure to verify that your
    shock’s mounting hardware is properly torqued (60-in-lb).
    • Over-torqued mounting hardware will cause the shock to bind and malfunction. Under-torqued mounting hardware can damage frame, hardware, and shock.
    After Every 20 hours of Riding
    Remove, clean, and grease mounting hardware.
    AIR CAN SERVICE
    1. Release air in shock. Remove valve stems.
    2. Using RockShox Spanner wrench, loosen completely Lock can. Remove air can from shock.
    3. Closely inspect the inside finish of the air can. Check for nicks or scratches that could cause damage to the o-rings. Check the leading edge of the can for any sharp
    burs that could damage the can o-ring or fixed piston glide ring.
    4. Inspect all o-rings, wipers and glide rings for damage. Lubricate each o-ring, wiper and glide ring.
    5. Lightly lubricate the SID Rear shock body. Gently slide the air can onto the SID Rear shock body.
    6. Orient the air valve properly and lightly snug the lock can.
    7. Re-install valve stems.
    S E R V I C E
    The SID rear shock should be fully serviced every year by a qualified technician with proper tools. Please contact your local
    RockShox dealer, RockShox Technical Services, or the nearest distributor in the International Distributors List.
    Read the Warranty section for further warranty repair and contact information.

  4. #4
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    ya i get the point that it need to be sent back but i want to know what is wrong with it i have a race in a week and dont have time to sent it back

  5. #5
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    It's an air shock that

    won't hold air. Find a local LBS that can help you out before the race.

    Other than that, like a flat tire that won't hold air, repair/replace (the shock) is all you can do.

    Jim

  6. #6
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    no it holds air fine it is almost like it is seased closed if i remove all the air should it move freeley?

  7. #7
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    Are you pumping up the negative spring chamber? If so the more air you add, the harder it will be to pry apart.

    Try removing air from both chambers and then only filling the positive air chamber...see if it will come apart then.

  8. #8
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    ok i will try that but it is almost bottomed out if not it is. and it has about 200psi in the positive how much should be in the negative

  9. #9
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    The shock is getting old, it happens... I'd try and find a replacement while you are sending it back.

  10. #10
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    owners' manual here

    Quote Originally Posted by ryan44
    ok i will try that but it is almost bottomed out if not it is. and it has about 200psi in the positive how much should be in the negative

    http://www.orangebikes.co.uk/technic...AR_ENGLISH.pdf

    Jim

    Selecting Air Pressure (Spring Rate):
    1. Depressurize the positive and negative air chamber by removing the air cap and depressing the valve
    core stems.
    2. Because every bike is different, a good starting point is to pressurize the positive air chamber to an air
    pressure equaling your body weight.
    NOTE: AS BICYCLE DESIGNS DIFFER SIGNIFICANTLY, YOUR BICYCLE MAY REQUIRE DIFFERENT PRESSURES
    OR SET UP TECHNIQUES. THESE INSTRUCTIONS ARE INTENDED AS A GUIDELINE ONLY.
    3. After adding air to your shock based on your body weight, and without sitting on the bike, measure the
    distance from the rear axle to the seat (rear height). Write it down.
    4. While you sit in a normal riding position, have a friend measure the same distance. The difference
    between the two measurements is sag. Determine what percentage of total wheel travel this sag
    represents.
    5. If the sag is less than your bicycle manufacturer’s recommendation, a lower air pressure should be used.
    If the sag is greater than your bike manufacturer’s recommendation, a greater air pressure should be
    used.
    IMPORTANT: DO NOT USE AIR PRESSURE OUTSIDE THE 100 TO 250 PSI RANGE.
    6. Once sag has been set, pressurize the negative air chamber to match the positive air chamber pressure.
    TIP: ADJUSTING THE NEGATIVE AIR CHAMBER DETERMINES THE EASE OF INITIAL COMPRESSION. THE
    HIGHER THE AIR PRESSURE YOU PUT IN, THE EASIER IT IS TO COMPRESS THE SHOCK.
    7. Measure the sag once again to make sure it is the same. Write down the measurement and air pressure
    reading from the shock.
    8. Install both air caps.
    Example: If your bike has 4” of rear wheel travel and you want to set it up for cross-country
    riding, your sag should be 0.6 - 1.2 in. If you weigh 175 lb., pressurize the positive chamber to
    175 psi and measure your sag. Then pressurize the negative air chamber to 175 psi and
    remeasure sag.
    NOTE: IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE SHOCK HAS THE AIR VALVE CAPS ON AT ALL TIMES OR THE SHOCK CAN
    PREMATURELY LOSE AIR.
    Rebound Damping Adjustment (Some Models)
    The shock includes a red rebound damping adjustment knob. Rebound is the extension or return
    stroke of the shock. Rebound damping adjustment allows you to control the rate at which the
    shock extends after it is compressed. The shock’s rebound is quickest when the adjustment
    knob is in the full counterclockwise position. Rebound is slowest when the adjustment knob is
    in the full clockwise position.
    SETTING REBOUND
    When you are setting rebound, a good starting point is the “curb” test. Be sure this is done after
    you set up your sag.
    1. Set your rebound adjuster fully counterclockwise.
    2. Ride the bike off the curb sitting in the saddle and count the number of times the shock bounces
    before returning to nominal sag. You want to achieve one bounce.
    3. Turn the rebound adjuster a quarter turn clockwise and ride off the curb again. Continue to do
    this until one bounce is achieved.
    4. Record the number of turns from the fully closed (full counterclockwise) position.

  11. #11
    pronounced may-duh
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    It's stuck closed. I think that happens sometimes to air shocks. In the manual for my fox shock it says if it gets stuck closed you need to send it back to fox to get fixed. Why not call rock shox or find a local dealer who knows how to service shocks.

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