1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    49

    Cool-blue Rhythm My front end comes up during climb

    There's quite a few hills on my local trail that at the top or the middle of a climb. My front wheel leaves the ground. Sometimes this results in me falling off and rolling down the hill lol.

    If I lean too forward my rear wheel loses traction. While my skills and balance is improving, is there anything to help mechanically? Someone suggested changing my stem to a 6 degree 100mm? My stocker on my '11 Giant Revel 0 is a 15 degree stem and it is short. I guessimate about 65mm.

    Thoughts? Suggestions?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fireball_jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    301
    If you feel cramped, then a longer stem might help, however if you're stretched correctly at that stem length, a long one will only make riding the bike worse.

    While a lot of getting a hardtail up steep inclines is being in the right gear and being able to balance, if your rear tire is too eager to spin, you might want to look for one that digs in more, or is better suited to the conditions you ride in. Rarely are stock tires perfect for where you ride.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gasp4Air's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,259
    It sounds like when you keep enough weight forward to maintain control of the front, you spin out in back, and if you keep enough weight on the rear wheel, the front goes floppy on you. The way to keep weight forward and back at the same time is this: slide your butt to the nose of the saddle so it is planted firmly in your taint (taint what's in front, taint what's in back, it just taint!). At the same time, pull your upper body down to the bars. Then just spin. How far onto the nose and how far down to the bars is determined by the steepness of the climb - you have to experiment. If this works for you, you may want to find a taint friendly saddle - some are much better than others. Droopy and/or wide nose is the thing to look for.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: el_burras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    216
    The first thing to do is RELAX, if you have your arms and hands choking your handlebar and grips is more likely your going to loose control over your bike, let it breathe and she will take care of you.
    Second, whenever you start climbing set your right gear, DO NOT SHIFT in the middle of the hill, this will put a lot of stress on your drive train and you may damage it AND MOST LIKELY YOU WILL LOOSE MOMENTUM.Start climbing on a conformable gear.
    Third, choose the line your going to take uphill, once you do don't change it, follow that line, remember YOUR BIKE WILL FOLLOW YOUR EYES.
    Fourth, move forward on your seat, this will balance the weight between front and back tires, one thing to remember RELAX, DON'T CHOKE YOUR HANDLEBAR.

    RELAX AND ENJOY, YOUR BIKE WILL TAKE CARE OF IT, ALSO ALWAYS PEDAL SITTING DOWN, DO NOT STAND UP, YOU'LL GAIN MORE STRENGTH ON YOUR LEGS IF YOU PEDAL SITTING DOWN

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nick_Good's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    48
    What works for me when it gets real steep is getting in an easy gear, sliding forward to the nose of the seat, keeping my elbows in and pulling back on the bars a bit. So far this has worked for me; especially when it is a steep, loose, rocky uphill grind. BTW i also have a Revel 0. It's a good bike for the price. Getting ready to ditch the BB5's for BB7's and eventually swap the Dart 2 for a Tora. Those are the only upgrades I see for it.
    -Nick

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,235
    Best Balance point:

    The tip of the saddle is pointed up where the sum don't shine
    Last edited by jeffscott; 08-03-2011 at 12:39 PM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    4,642
    Successfully riding up an incline like that is akin to a golf swing. There are a ton of factors and you have to get them right (and understand them) in order to make it a repeatable process.

    I'm getting better at the steep, short inclines. I still stall out on a few of them.

    The things I'm doing that seem to help (some previously mentioned by others):
    1) Get in a low gear and stay there
    2) Lean forward to help keep that front wheel down
    3) Scoot forward on the seat so I'm sitting on the "nose"
    4) Gently "pull back" on the handlebars about half way up the climb to dig in the rear tire so I don't loose traction
    5) Keep my eyes on the line I'm attempting to take, not looking down at the tire
    6) If I can, gather some speed right before the incline so the momentum will help carry me up as far as I can get.
    7) Run lower pressure in my rear tire to increase traction

    I'm sure there are other things. This is all I could think of for now. Oh, and practice, practice, practice.

    Finding a line on some of my climbs still seems impossible. But, a few I previously thought were impossible I can now accomplish. Same will happen with you.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    17
    I had the same problem, sans the rolling down the hill. If you have any spacers below your stem move one or two of them above your stem.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    4,642
    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeRoaster View Post
    I had the same problem, sans the rolling down the hill. If you have any spacers below your stem move one or two of them above your stem.
    Very good idea. No cost, easy way to lower your handlebar and help keep the front end down.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    47
    I had the same issue. I figured out that I was pedaling to hard. Once I smoothed out my pedaling I have no more problems.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tshulthise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    429
    Quote Originally Posted by pawa_k2001 View Post
    I had the same issue. I figured out that I was pedaling to hard. Once I smoothed out my pedaling I have no more problems.
    +1

    If you are balanced so that your front end is just under control then you can't do anything more to improve balance other than keeping your weight distributed there the whole climb and not being jerky. That leaves you with pedaling very smoothly so you don't pulse the rear wheel and having the right tire and tire pressure for the terrain you are riding.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Andy Pancroft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    511
    I'm kind of a - don't buy into all this overthinking stuff - guy. Your prob is simply too much torque - your pedaling hard enough do pull a wheelie; smaller gear and easy/smooth pedaling. Back in the day before stems - when they were known as goosenecks - we were able to get our bikes successfully up hills.

    Try this and add a couple Dale's Pale Ales to your bottle cages and you'll be fine!!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tshulthise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    429
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pancroft View Post
    I'm kind of a - don't buy into all this overthinking stuff - guy. Your prob is simply too much torque - your pedaling hard enough do pull a wheelie; smaller gear and easy/smooth pedaling. Back in the day before stems - when they were known as goosenecks - we were able to get our bikes successfully up hills.

    Try this and add a couple Dale's Pale Ales to your bottle cages and you'll be fine!!
    This advice won't get you very far. Technical climbs aren't the same as riding up a steep driveway when we were kids. A steep technical climb requires technique and skill to pull off... smooth pedaling is just one component of many needed.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    4,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pancroft View Post
    Your prob is simply too much torque - your pedaling hard enough do pull a wheelie; smaller gear and easy/smooth pedaling.
    I agree that this helps. I break my rear tire loose if I'm stomping on the pedals during a climb.

    I'm willing to bet you're doing some of the other stuff (maybe subconsciously) like leaning forward, also...
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

Similar Threads

  1. Which Front Range Trail do you think is the toughest climb?
    By Thrasher in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 161
    Last Post: 06-04-2012, 01:16 PM
  2. Best Front Range Climb
    By drmaino in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-19-2011, 10:09 AM
  3. Biggest climb on the Front Range?
    By titusguy in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-07-2010, 12:46 AM
  4. Front wheel lifting during a climb
    By elistan in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-30-2004, 01:02 PM
  5. Light front wheel during steep climb
    By JerryBoneJr in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-11-2004, 12:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •