1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
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    My first Superman

    Riding through the foothills in Boise this past weekend, having a blast not doing anything too technical or fast. Made my way up the 3 mile climb to some great quick downhill littered with bumps, stumps, roots, and jumps and Im really getting to it, thinking to myself "wow! this is such a great sport. so glad I got back into biking". My decent takes me down through the hills and cheat grass with patches of sagebrush to a wooded area along a creek/canal; a quick right followed by an ever quicker left on rutted banked singletrack sneaks up on me. I manuever through the right, flick the bike left braking just a little too hard for the unforseen sand in the corner. My front tire washes out, my bars cross, the bike comes to abrupt stop and I am heading over the front wheel in my best Superman pose. As I fly through the air "faster than a speeding bullet" I hear my bike tumbling behind me. The ground is rushing up to meet me and my out-stretched arms and suddenly I realize 'I do NOT have the powers of the Planet Krypton'. My mind kicks in screaming in my head "Tuck and roll Dummy! Tuck and Roll!!. At the last possible second I manage to pull my arms from their Justice League positions and hold them against my chest, turn my shoulder down and dig in to the ground.

    Damn Im too old for this chit. .......nah, not really. But it definitely reminded me Im not a kid anymore. Scraped up my sholder and knee, but thanks to helmets I have no permanent brain damage (well, no more than I started with). After a quick body check and bike once over, I hopped back on and rode the 3 miles home before anyone could point and make fun of me.

    Just thought I'd share. What a great weekend of riding!

  2. #2
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    Jaja that was awesome. Good to hear ur ok. What helmet u use?

  3. #3
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    Currently using a 2012 Giro Xar.

  4. #4
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    duplicate post... sorry.

  5. #5
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
    Reputation: GelatiCruiser's Avatar
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    How's the bike? J/K Glad you're ok!


    No, seriously.

  6. #6
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    Bike's good. Held up great. Going to take it in soon for a tune anyway, so I will have my mech check the true on the wheels as well.

  7. #7
    duh
    Reputation: deke505's Avatar
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    I think some flying lessons would be in order.

  8. #8
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    Glad you're OK. I dislocated a shoulder and got a mild concussion in Ohio doing a superman into a tree. I did my best planking impression ever as I hit the tree. I was just lucky my shoulder hit and not my head straight on or it would have probably broken my neck. I ended up cracking my helmet in half.

    The best part was I walked the couple miles out of Lake Hope state park rolling my bike because I couldn't move my shoulder. Then i loaded the bike onto my Thule rack on back of my jeep and drove a standard one handed on some winding country roads back to Athens, OH where I went to the ER.

    I think the large 250 lb female nurse popping my shoulder back into place was more painful than the entire wreck.
    [SIZE="5"]It's easy to make a buck, it's much harder to make a difference."[/SIZE]

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