MTBR Glossary

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  • 01-28-2013
    sub7even
    5 minute on this post, worth it!! thx mate!
  • 01-31-2013
    Zachua
    OEM

    In the car world it means original equipment manufacturer. Same thing here? I keep seeing people refer to components from certain online retailers as OEM.
  • 02-01-2013
    David C
    MTBR Glossary
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Zachua View Post
    OEM

    In the car world it means original equipment manufacturer. Same thing here? I keep seeing people refer to components from certain online retailers as OEM.

    Yup, and mostly just OE (original equipment). Also sometimes you'll see Take-Off, which is a part that has been taken off a bike and put for sale, often new or in very good condition, but not necessarily an OE part, since many particular seller will do this as well as retailers. Even more, both OE and Take-Off parts will not come with any retail packaging or user manual/documentation, as well as extras or supplied parts (like an allen/torx wrench for disc brake kit). However, OE and new Take-Off should always be brand new never used and come with the same warranty (if sold ** a retailer) as normal, unless specified.
  • 02-03-2013
    Dr. Dolittle
    Thanks very much. I'm sure I'll be referring back to this quite often for awhile.
  • 02-07-2013
    Jeremy1983
    This is great info. Thanks all!
  • 02-08-2013
    Nathax
    This helps quite a bit...
  • 02-15-2013
    Robswin
    Ah there were a few I was wondering about. Cheers
  • 02-16-2013
    squeak12
    Good Stuff
  • 02-20-2013
    Snypr18
    Thanks for the info.
  • 02-21-2013
    aggietaco09
    glad I saw this thread
  • 02-21-2013
    perttime
    OEM
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Yup, and mostly just OE (original equipment). Also sometimes you'll see Take-Off, ...
    ... both OE and Take-Off parts will not come with any retail packaging or user manual/documentation, as well as extras or supplied parts...

    Another thing is: OEM tends to refer to the BIKE manufacturer, not the component manufacturer.

    Component manufacturers sometimes supply large bike companies with parts that are made to the bike company's specs, and are not available elsewhere. For example, an OEM fork might have a different set of features, compared with forks that are otherwise available. Or an OEM shock might have some special tuning tailored for a particular bike design (and less suited for some other design).
  • 02-24-2013
    bhull4
    Very Helpful
  • 03-11-2013
    dRyk
    Very Informational!
  • 03-23-2013
    dv8xin
    PITA to have to learn all these acronyms, IMO.

    THX OP.

    I got hung up on stupid things like the difference between rigid and HT and also getting to know if there was any difference between 15QR and 15mm TA.

    Wait until you get to all the #s like 31.6, 31.8, 30.9, 27.2, 34.9, 68/73mm, 156Q, 56ZS, 49EC, 44IS, 57-599, 1/2" x 3/32", 180/185mm, 120/80 BCD, DOT 4, DOT 4.1, DOT 5, 1.2mm x 2000, etc. Watch out for mixed metric/imperial measurements and conversions... 5" of travel is how much in mm, 120, 125, or 127mm?

    Watch out for all the brand specific acronyms too, like RLC, RC2, RC3, RCT3, TST, BB30, PF30, PF92, BB95, etc. :madman:

    Then there's always the frame fit jargon, like SO, ST, HT, ETT, etc. :eekster:

    Deciding to buy a frame, after buying and riding an used high performance bike and getting spoiled by nice parts, and comparing to other frames and then deciding to spec it nicely, has been fairly complex learning experience. I could probably spend another week surfing this board, but in the end, I bet I will still find myself to be stupid and uninformed, unable to find answers to any of my questions really, and with an emptying bank account. I don't think others with 1000s of posts and years of surfing this forum are really any better off than me, except maybe they learned to close their minds after allowing all this questionable knowledge swell their heads.
  • 03-24-2013
    dv8xin
    MAMIL - middle-aged men in lycra.

    Found it in a bike review quote, "balanced and comfortable enough to get the most hamfisted MAMIL to the end of a sportive feeling like a pro."
  • 03-24-2013
    zarr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dv8xin View Post
    MAMIL - middle-aged men in lycra.

    Found it in a bike review quote, "balanced and comfortable enough to get the most hamfisted MAMIL to the end of a sportive feeling like a pro."

    ...And lookin' like a dummy.
  • 03-26-2013
    PretendGentleman
    Nice work!
    Here's my take on a few that I disagree about.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Quick facts :


    • Do not remove factory lube from a new chain, just wipe off excess with a rag when getting dirty.
      factory chain lube is good for keeping a chain new on the shelf. it prevents corrosion. It is also good for ensuring that any dirt that gets near your chain clings to it and works its way inside the chain. Leave it on at your own risk
    • 1/2" pedals threads are mainly for BMX use. 9/16" threads are more common for MTB and road use.
      1/2" pedal threads are for 1 piece cranks (only on the cheapest modern bikes) typically and 9/16" threads go with essentially all nicer cranks; there is not a distinction between bmx and mtb.
    • Seat post should be inserted at least to the minimum insertion length and better if long enough to go past the seat tube - top tube junction of the frame to ensure maximum strength and prevent frame fatigue.
      minimum insertion marks on the post are for the integrity of the post. For conventional frames, ensure that your post is inserted to go at least a half inch beyond the bottom wall of the top tube, where it meets the seattube; ultimately the frame mfg may have a different recommendation than the seatpost mfg. make sure both are met.
    • Put a protector on the chainstay of your bike to prevent the chain from damaging it. A simple inner tube can be wrapped around with zip ties.
      this is only necessary for bikes that use springs to tension the chain. for many single speeds, this doesn't matter.

  • 03-26-2013
    perttime
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    Nice work!
    Here's my take on a few that I disagree about.

    factory chain lube is good for keeping a chain new on the shelf. it prevents corrosion. It is also good for ensuring that any dirt that gets near your chain clings to it and works its way inside the chain. Leave it on at your own risk

    Here's my take on one thing that I disagree about.

    All major chain manufacturers state that their Factory Lubes are probably the best thing for the internals of the chain.... as long as it lasts.

    The thing about exterior gunk is a very much separate thing. Wipe off the stuff from the exterior of the chain, maybe even with a rag that is wet with WD-40, or something. Add a thin layer of dry or waxy lube (maybe). But don't go soaking off the greasy stuff from the interior of the chain, until you have a good reason to.
  • 04-09-2013
    dv8xin
    DINK - dual income, no kids

    "the stereotypical, middle-aged DINK who always has the latest gear despite carrying five extra kilos of body mass and displaying the handling prowess of a giraffe on a skating rink."
  • 08-06-2013
    Racnad
    Forgive me if these questions have been answered on pages 2-11 but I didn't want to spend all day reading them. I was heavily into the MTB scene from 1990-1994 but sort of fell out out of it, then recently I've been getting back into it. As most FS bikes look the same to me (there's the ones that just look like bikes with a rear shock, then the bikes that look like motorcycles with no motors), I'm finding the miriad of MTB classifications confusing.

    1) Can a FS (full suspension) bike be considered XC?
    2) Can a hardtail be considered All Mountain?
    3) What are the differences between All Mountain, Over Mountain, Trail and Enduro?
  • 08-06-2013
    David C
    MTBR Glossary
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Racnad View Post
    Forgive me if these questions have been answered on pages 2-11 but I didn't want to spend all day reading them. I was heavily into the MTB scene from 1990-1994 but sort of fell out out of it, then recently I've been getting back into it. As most FS bikes look the same to me (there's the ones that just look like bikes with a rear shock, then the bikes that look like motorcycles with no motors), I'm finding the miriad of MTB classifications confusing.

    1) Can a FS (full suspension) bike be considered XC?
    2) Can a hardtail be considered All Mountain?
    3) What are the differences between All Mountain, Over Mountain, Trail and Enduro?

    1 and 2, yes.

    3, they are pretty much all about riding bikes over chunky stuff and having a blast. Others will chime in on this. Endure is pretty much a competition though.
  • 08-06-2013
    Racnad
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dv8xin View Post
    PITA to have to learn all these acronyms, IMO.

    THX OP.

    I got hung up on stupid things like the difference between rigid and HT and also getting to know if there was any difference between 15QR and 15mm TA.

    Wait until you get to all the #s like 31.6, 31.8, 30.9, 27.2, 34.9, 68/73mm, 156Q, 56ZS, 49EC, 44IS, 57-599, 1/2" x 3/32", 180/185mm, 120/80 BCD, DOT 4, DOT 4.1, DOT 5, 1.2mm x 2000, etc. Watch out for mixed metric/imperial measurements and conversions... 5" of travel is how much in mm, 120, 125, or 127mm?

    Watch out for all the brand specific acronyms too, like RLC, RC2, RC3, RCT3, TST, BB30, PF30, PF92, BB95, etc. :madman:

    Then there's always the frame fit jargon, like SO, ST, HT, ETT, etc. :eekster:

    Deciding to buy a frame, after buying and riding an used high performance bike and getting spoiled by nice parts, and comparing to other frames and then deciding to spec it nicely, has been fairly complex learning experience. I could probably spend another week surfing this board, but in the end, I bet I will still find myself to be stupid and uninformed, unable to find answers to any of my questions really, and with an emptying bank account. I don't think others with 1000s of posts and years of surfing this forum are really any better off than me, except maybe they learned to close their minds after allowing all this questionable knowledge swell their heads.

    When most all bikes had a horizontal top tube, frame size was the distance between the center of the bottom bracket and the top of the top top. These days with sloping top tube and other exotic designs there's no standard for bike frame sizes. Add to that the fact that different people have different inseam, body and arm reach porportions, and these affect bike fit. Two people of the same height may not fit optimumly on the same bike. The only thing bike size labels are good for is a rough guide of which bikes in a shop you should try out.
  • 08-06-2013
    Racnad
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by David C View Post
    1 and 2, yes.

    3, they are pretty much all about riding bikes over chunky stuff and having a blast. Others will chime in on this. Endure is pretty much a competition though.

    By today's definitions, would my 2002 Cannondale Jekyll be considered XC or AM?
  • 08-06-2013
    David C
    MTBR Glossary
    By today's definition, your bike is still for the same usage as when it was designed 12 years ago.

    My 2000 dual suspension XC bike is still for XC.
  • 08-07-2013
    Racnad
    Silly me! I thought these words all came into use during the past few years. I was looking though old files and found the 2002 Cannondale catalog from when I was last seriously shopping for a new bike. The Gemini was called "Freeride" and the Jekyll & Super-V were under "All Mountian." Way to pay attention!
  • 08-19-2013
    SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    CHUM = Cycling Has an Ugly Moderator


    (just kiddin' Nick - you are pretty)

    SMT = Shiver me Timbers
  • 11-09-2013
    mtb_beginner
    Re: MTBR Glossary
    What is EBB?
  • 11-09-2013
    fishwrinkle
    Eccentric Bottom Bracket - offset BB that can be used to tension a chain, is the most common use. think of a cam
  • 12-06-2013
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Get connected, to a similar link.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...ighlight=slang
  • 09-19-2014
    AK_Killem
    Helpful thread for noobs like me. :)
  • 01-27-2015
    donald r
    cool ... appreciated a lot....
  • 08-10-2015
    Gorn1120
    Perhaps a mod could edit the thread to update as necessary / new thread managed by an active member.
  • 05-10-2016
    LifeOnTwoWheels
    great info!
  • 05-15-2016
    Landocalriz
    Good to Know
  • 07-01-2016
    Getmeinshape
    Glad I joined this forum, thanks!
  • 07-07-2016
    Kharmore
    Thanks for the info!
  • 07-22-2016
    jproaster
    More helpful info. Great!
  • 07-22-2016
    Varaxis
    Need clarification on what *exactly* Braaaaap means.

    A) Sound that a tire makes when it is pushed to its limits
    B) Sound of a 2 stroke gasoline engine
    C) Other (explain)

    Need a definition check for: "50:01" - Love back wheel.
    - Apparently it stands for the ratio for the percentage of weight placed on the rear wheel, and to the front, implying riding the back wheel with the front having only enough weight to not keep it from flying backwards in a manual.

    Also need a nomenclature check on the nut that tightens down a tubeless valve. Valve lock nut?
  • 07-22-2016
    Sidewalk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Need clarification on what *exactly* Braaaaap means

    Sound of an accelerating 4 stroke motorcycle. Often mistakenly used as the sound of a smoker, when anyone has raced knows that 2 strokes are "ring dingers". Drives me nuts.

    "Braaaaaap" = riding hard
  • 08-05-2016
    khagan
    nice post.
  • 08-05-2016
    Westcoast_kid
    Awesome
  • 08-12-2016
    bellnghmrider
    Took me a bit to figure out what DJ was...
  • 08-16-2016
    fishwrinkle
    Disc jockey, duh. Love me some disc jockey bikes
  • 08-16-2016
    bellnghmrider
    Yup. I'm partial to the Kona "Wolfman Jack" and the Cannondale "Rick Dees", myself.
  • 10-22-2016
    Midgemagnet
    RTFM: A strong recommendation to read the manual, normally used after the fact in a :madman: context.