1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    MTB related jobs

    I am almost at the end of my compulsory education and need to decide what to do next. This is either university or an alternative, and no uni course jumps out at me.


    I wondered if you guys could think of any jobs in mountain biking field. I like the idea of trail building but don't know if its a job I can make a life out of. All the feature length films inspire me and the obvious job is camera work, but is there huge demand for this or not.


    If there are any other jobs you guys could think of it would be really useful.


    I am based in the UK but like the idea of traveling and would love to move country.

  2. #2
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    You ever hear of coeds? Universities are crawling with them.

    I started out waay long ago in Electrical Engineering. After two years of going to classes with 13 or 14 other men, I took a Microbiology course. I walked into a class with 300 kids. 200 were women. I got my degree in Microbiology.

    If the choice involves chasing skirts, well, can you really go wrong?

  3. #3
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    a lot of state park rangers in the US patrol the trails on mountain bikes. I think you would want to pursue a career in law enforcement and conservation to get involved in that.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Film and video tech jobs get to do a fair amount of travel. Here in the US, it's supposed to be easy to do well if you're not trying to sell a script.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Film and video tech jobs get to do a fair amount of travel. Here in the US, it's supposed to be easy to do well if you're not trying to sell a script.
    +1 on this

    I have a friend who travels all the time filming people cycling and he is really doing well!

  6. #6
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    What did he do to get into the bussiness?

    Im guessing I need to do a course and then move out to America to try land a job over there.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    You may want or need more training, but I got into production work by being comfortable with picking up a crescent wrench and showing up on time and sober. There's some real skill in it, but it's not rocket science. I think most people here learn it on the job.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Well I only have a basic knowledge of camera work at the moment so it would be nice to build on that. How did you find a company that was employing? Ive had a look around and seems hard to get into.

  9. #9
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    Send resumes to every theater, film, video and theater equipment rental house, production company, and TV studio within a feasible commute. Unless it rains offers or you get an offer for a full-time gig (a lot of this stuff is freelance) take any and every technical gig you get offered. Don't lie about your experience, show up on time and ready to work and learn, and you'll do great. If a Union handles some of this stuff in your area, get in touch with them too.

    If you don't immediately land a camera loader position, don't be afraid to talk to the department heads about wanting to get into camera work. Have some business cards made. I used vistaprint.com.

    When I first got into stage craft, I did it by sending resumes to every Off-Broadway theater. Later, I transitioned into mostly working for production companies. That was word of mouth.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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