Results 1 to 50 of 50

Thread: Mountain Bikes

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    71

    Mountain Bikes

    What can you expect from a sub 500 dollar mountain bike? What about sub 750? Sub 1000?

    Is there a dollar amount that you can expect to see a definite change in the specs of a mountain bike?

    This thread is just a discussion of what you can expect to get from a mountain bike in a specific price range.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    63
    Shopping in a LBS with no sales, I'd have a hard time even finding a mtb sub 500, but on such a bike I would expect to get something that can barely handle my singletrack trails. Fork and components will probably be bottom rung alivio componentry or worse. Sub 750 I expect to get a decent entry level bike with X5 or deore components, probably tektro disc or v brakes, and a low end fork either sr suntour or a rockshox dart. Sub 1000 gets a little better drivetrain and possibly some low end hydraulics. Unfortunately it seems like you still have to spend over 1000 in my LBS to get anything better than a suntour or dart for the fork though.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    135
    sub 500 is not worth your time. Bikes starting at $500 will be good for frames but the components wont be top of the line. A sub $750 bike's components will be just fine!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    27
    It really depends on how much and how rough of trail riding you will be doing. I agree that a sub $500 MTB isn't really meant to see real trails. You will see marked differences at the $750, $1000, $1500, and even $2000 price points. Not just in quality and in features, but mainly in durability of the components as the price gets higher. The question is, where are you riding, how often, and how long are you keeping the bike.
    Frank Webber | Orbea USA
    Customer Service | MTB Promotion

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: erginguney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    974
    One thing worth pointing out is that the answer of your question would change considerably based on whether you're talking about a hardtail or a full-suspension bike (or even a rigid, for that matter). A 1000-dollar hardtail and a 1000-dollar full-suspension would be very different in terms of quality. (The hardtail at that price would be pretty respectable, whereas the full-suspension would be inadequate in most respects.) Since a full-suspension bike needs to include an extra shock absorber, some more frame linkages, extra bearings, and involve the labor to put those together, it's going to have more cost overhead. So, a full-suspension bike would occupy a substantially higher price category compared to a hardtail bike of "comparable quality level".

    As a general rule of thumb, at least based on my own perception, I wouldn't take any full-suspension bike under $1500 seriously, if I intend to ride it for a long while. I would place that same threshold somewhere around $700-800 for a hardtail, and possibly as low as $500 for a fully rigid bike. For others, these ranges might be higher or lower slightly.
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    37
    I would say for that amount I would go used. I got a used Cannondal F1000 for $380, it is awesome and came with some cool Spin Carbon wheels and also pretty decent component mix). Or even better than that, you can check garage sales (found a Barracuda A2R for $30, Trek 990 for $25, so there are deals to be had)

  7. #7
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    216
    I have a 300 dollar DB Response with Alivio stuff, RST fork and I keep up AND passed a 1,000 dollar plus Specialized bikes all the time on our local groups.

    Just today I blew a tire(valve ripped off the tube and she went down quick.

    My big, heavy Diamondback just seems to keep going and going....

    She owes me nothing.

  8. #8
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    216
    It's all BS and go get a 500 dollar bike and hit the trails..

    Trust me....you don't need a 800 or 1,000 dollar bike to get your feet wet....

    Sure it won't shift as quick or soften the bumbs as well, but hey, it'll make you a better rider IMO.

    When you can ride with dudes on 1,000 dollar haros and specialized....then think about more expensive bikes.

    I get tired of people making you think you have to get 800 + bikes....you simply don't have to for your first time...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ldollard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post
    It's all BS and go get a 500 dollar bike and hit the trails..

    Trust me....you don't need a 800 or 1,000 dollar bike to get your feet wet....

    Sure it won't shift as quick or soften the bumbs as well, but hey, it'll make you a better rider IMO.

    When you can ride with dudes on 1,000 dollar haros and specialized....then think about more expensive bikes.

    I get tired of people making you think you have to get 800 + bikes....you simply don't have to for your first time...
    This is completely all true, but at the same time, if you want to get a bike that will last, you might as well spend $700+ on a good HT instead of $500 twice because the bikes too heavy or inadequate for your needs when you are a better rider.

    To me its simple economics, its why i buy sony laptops or bose speakers, not because i'm rich (which i'm not), but because i dont want to waste the money potentially spending double/triple on multiple merchandise purchases cause i was too cheap in the first place.

    But obviously if you cant pony up more buying a $100 walmart special is better than not riding at all.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    7
    I'm with Ganymede on this, I got into this hobby on a Giant Boulder ($350 on sale new from my LBS). I think they named it Boulder to allude to its weight but really that just strengthened by endurance pedaling that bulk up hills.
    I also feel like it was a smart move because it was a good simple platform to discover riding (not bike building) and if we're honest actually riding the bike should be what we're after.
    As for components they did their job just as good as my "better bike" for four years until I goofed on a tree stump and broke a deraileur, I replaced it with another stock deraileur and it's been working fine again for three years.
    In summary I say a good trail is worth a lot more than a costly bike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: High Side's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    279
    I started on a $350 LBS bike

    I destroyed every component in 6 months of moderate riding

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpeters's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,330
    I started at 1200 and destroyed two hubs two cassettes two chains a head set and a middle deore crank ring. I ride a lot and not to hard but a lot and I am a bigger guy. You can start with what ever you want for me I just wait till a frame is on sale and I get it and just change the frame every so often. I would recommend your first bike be a good one with good parts (if you are sure you will like the sport) because if you want a new bike later for whatever reason you just need to upgrade the frame. That is how I do it if you shop around and upgrade as needed you will always have a fresh new bike. It is also fun getting new parts and if you wait till the year end you can find killer deals on bikes and frames.
    Last edited by jpeters; 07-23-2011 at 05:39 AM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,655
    My advice- do you have a friend that knows bikes? If so have them help you look for a used deal on Craigslist.

    My current bike I bought off EBAY, but I knew what I wanted and size, paid $2k for a $4.5k bike that was mint and only a few months old.

    I'm not insulting anyone here, but you have some guys saying go cheap it holds up, well how do we know what they ride.

    I can only pick on G_L here. He says he riding all kinds of tough stuff in another post, but then says in the same post that he rides it all with seat post up in a power position, which really leads one to doubt just how tough and technical his riding is.

    I lasted 1 month on my cheap bike before I know I needed to upgrade.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: speedybacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    38
    my last bike was a trek 3900 which I got for about 325 if I remember right. The components worked alright but I would always bottom out the fork. Now I am looking at 29ers and know that I want to pay for an air shock. The more you pay the better the ride. The lower end bikes can still go on the same trails as others for the most part. Its all about the rider, how comfortable you want to be, and how rough you are on your components.

  15. #15
    RideDirt
    Reputation: aedubber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,252
    Just buy what FITS you and your riding style , its not all about how much you pay for your bike, you could have a $5k bike and still not know what to do with it . Its all about trial and error , learning what style riding YOU enjoy most and are good at . Once you figured out that your going to ride ,enjoy the sport , and wont quit in 6 months then maybe start looking to upgrade parts as they break or save up for a bike that is made for the riding style you have learned .. Personally a lot of people will say dont bother to upgrade your bike and just buy a new better one , but yet if you buy a new better one im sure there are things you will upgrade on it , so do as you please ,its your bike and money . You can make the bike you have just as good .

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6
    Your best bet would be craigslist. Just see if any of your friends know bike well enough to help you pick the right one for you.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Colo Springs E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    581
    One other thing worth mentioning... MOST people who buy new entry-level "mountain" bikes really need nothing more than a "trail" bike, as they won't actually be doing any real mountain biking. If you are going to be riding mostly single-track trails with the occasional rocks, small drop-offs, etc... you really don't need anything that hardcore. There are lots of sub-$750s that will stand up just fine. On the other hand if you're truly going to be "mountain biking," then you likely need to spend a little more for something that's a bit more robust.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: erginguney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    974
    Quote Originally Posted by Colo Springs E View Post
    One other thing worth mentioning... MOST people who buy new entry-level "mountain" bikes really need nothing more than a "trail" bike, as they won't actually be doing any real mountain biking. If you are going to be riding mostly single-track trails with the occasional rocks, small drop-offs, etc... you really don't need anything that hardcore. There are lots of sub-$750s that will stand up just fine. On the other hand if you're truly going to be "mountain biking," then you likely need to spend a little more for something that's a bit more robust.
    I think you're categorization is a bit off. If you had written "all mountain" where you wrote "mountain", you'd be essentially correct. But, your description is misleading in its current state.

    The categories called cross country (XC), trail, all mountain, freeride, downhill, trials, dirt jump, etc., are all "mountain bikes". The term "mountain bike" is the widest generic reference to all bikes with sturdy frames, beefy tires, usually some form of suspension, meant for some form or another of off-road riding. "All-mountain" bikes, on the other hand, are a fairly narrow category of mountain bikes; they're heavier and beefier than XC and trail bikes while still being light enough for extended climbs, and they are meant for riders who'll do some serious jumps and drops during the course of their ride, in addition to some of the most technical trails you can find anywhere (just short of a full-blown downhill course, perhaps).

    You don't have to take my word for it. The Wikipedia article on this is one of the better descriptions of mountain bike categories available online. You'll see that the article describes "trail bikes" as typically having around five inches of suspension, slacker geometry (more suitable for aggressive descents) than XC bikes, and being "built to handle rougher terrain than dedicated XC bikes". No one would say that XC bikes are for "not any real mountain biking". So, trail bikes are plenty beefy. Some examples are Santa Cruz Blur LT or Blur TRc, and Ibis Mojo (among many many others). In fact they're the type of bike most commonly used by the vast majority of mountain biking enthusiasts, and especially by those who own only a single mountain bike. If you're not going to be interested in stunts, a trail bike is arguably all that you need.

    So, you're correct that the poster doesn't need anything beefier than a trail bike. It is also correct that all-mountain bikes are even beefier. But, you were mistaken in confusing the term "mountain bike" with "all-mountain bike".
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by erginguney View Post
    I think you're categorization is a bit off. If you had written "all mountain" where you wrote "mountain", you'd be essentially correct. But, your description is misleading in its current state.

    The categories called cross country (XC), trail, all mountain, freeride, downhill, trials, dirt jump, etc., are all "mountain bikes". The term "mountain bike" is the widest generic reference to all bikes with sturdy frames, beefy tires, usually some form of suspension, meant for some form or another of off-road riding. "All-mountain" bikes, on the other hand, are a fairly narrow category of mountain bikes; they're heavier and beefier than XC and trail bikes while still being light enough for extended climbs, and they are meant for riders who'll do some serious jumps and drops during the course of their ride, in addition to some of the most technical trails you can find anywhere (just short of a full-blown downhill course, perhaps).

    You don't have to take my word for it. The on this is one of the better descriptions of mountain bike categories available online. You'll see that the article describes "trail bikes" as typically having around five inches of suspension, slacker geometry (more suitable for aggressive descents) than XC bikes, and being "built to handle rougher terrain than dedicated XC bikes". No one would say that XC bikes are for "not any real mountain biking". So, trail bikes are plenty beefy. Some examples are Santa Cruz Blur LT or Blur TRc, and Ibis Mojo (among many many others). In fact they're the type of bike most commonly used by the vast majority of mountain biking enthusiasts, and especially by those who own only a single mountain bike. If you're not going to be interested in stunts, a trail bike is arguably all that you need.
    I am an ex-motocross racer and serious mountain biker from the 80s, but I got side-tracked with raising a family and did the career thing.

    I am now 47, 6'3" 225 pounds and slightly out of shape, but can ride strong on rolling trails, but I want to get back into riding up hill and going downhill fast here in Marin County.

    I want a XC bike, right, or do I want a different category? I like light weight bikes with smooth shifting. I am a component junky and looked at BD, but not sure which to buy under $1,000.

    With my ability level, what are the trade-offs between hard-tail and full-suspension? I don't see myself leaping off anything greater than 3' drop-offs.

    Craigslist didn't have anything for me right now. Should I consider a bike on BD for under $1,000?
    Last edited by duffin; 07-25-2011 at 11:26 AM. Reason: edited 3" to 3'

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarolinaLL6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    960
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I want a XC bike, right, or do I want a different category? I like light weight bikes with smooth shifting. I am a component junky and looked at BD, but not sure which to buy under $1,000.

    With my ability level, what are the trade-offs between hard-tail and full-suspension? I don't see myself leaping off anything greater than 3" drop-offs.
    The obvious trade off is you get more bike when buying an HT than FS for the same $ spent.

    3" or 3'?

    3" not much need for anything heavier than XC.
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: erginguney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    974
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I am an ex-motocross racer and serious mountain biker from the 80s, but I got side-tracked with raising a family and did the career thing.

    I am now 47, 6'3" 225 pounds and slightly out of shape, but can ride strong on rolling trails, but I want to get back into riding up hill and going downhill fast here in Marin County.

    I want a XC bike, right, or do I want a different category? I like light weight bikes with smooth shifting. I am a component junky and looked at BD, but not sure which to buy under $1,000.

    With my ability level, what are the trade-offs between hard-tail and full-suspension? I don't see myself leaping off anything greater than 3" drop-offs.

    Craigslist didn't have anything for me right now. Should I consider a bike on BD for under $1,000?
    I agree with Mike, above. Few, if any, of your circumstances lend themselves to any special consideration not applicable to everyone. My advice to you would be the following:

    • At any given fixed price level, you'd be buying a better bike if you buy a hardtail compared to buying a full-suspension. Especially when you're at low enough price level (such as, under $1000) that this difference between the hardtail and FS would spell the difference between "respectable" and "questionable", the hardtail would be the better choice. So, I'd definitely go for the hardtail bike at that price level, unless there's a specific reason that you must buy an FS (e.g., you know you'll be buying a much better FS bike later on and getting into serious racing using that bike, so you need a starter FS just so you can start developing FS-specific riding skills from today). Since you say you were an avid rider in the '80s, you're most likely comfortable with riding hardtails anyway; I assume you weren't riding an FS back then.


    • Your weight is somewhat on the heavy side for a mountain biker (like myself), but probably not enough to be a special consideration. There are some high-end XC racing bikes that come with conditions like "not for riders above 165 lbs", but you don't have much risk of encountering any such model in the sub-$1000 price category. The worst that might happen would be to come across a model that's so cheap that it will under your weight due to sheer low quality, but that can be easily avoided by a basic level of common sense.


    • The riding conditions in Marin County don't constitute any special challenges for most bikes. Most riding there consists of fire roads that are in fairly good shape, though a handful are pretty technical. Even a lightweight XC bike (to the extent that you could find one in that price range) should be easily able to handle that.

    So, I think you can start looking for a hardtail in your price range and safely focus on the component set and the fit of the bike.
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    So, you are all saying I should not get a Motobecane 2011 Fantom Comp DS, but get something like a Motobecane 2010 Fantom PRO DS to enter into a acceptable FS quality level.

    And yes, I am looking for a new, different riding experience than riding a HT. I also need to try to keep up with my more advanced MTB friends who have FS. I was assuming the FS would help me go faster on up and down trails.

    But, I guess if an HT is really what I need, you are suggesting I get something like the Motobecane Fantom PRO correct?

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarolinaLL6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    960
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    So, you are all saying I should not get a Motobecane 2011 Fantom Comp DS, but get something like a Motobecane 2010 Fantom PRO DS to enter into a acceptable FS quality level.

    And yes, I am looking for a new, different riding experience than riding a HT. I also need to try to keep up with my more advanced MTB friends who have FS. I was assuming the FS would help me go faster on up and down trails.

    But, I guess if an HT is really what I need, you are suggesting I get something like the Motobecane Fantom PRO correct?
    Generally FS excel on the downhill and HT on the uphill. If all of your riding buds are zooming around on FS bikes and you want a different riding experience then go FS. Your two choices fantom HT Pro and Pro DS are a pretty good choices either way.
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Decisions, decisions...

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarolinaLL6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    960
    I didn't check the sizes available but inventory could have an effect in your choice. GL
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by CarolinaLL6 View Post
    If all of your riding buds are zooming around on FS bikes and you want a different riding experience then go FS. Your two choices fantom HT Pro and Pro DS are a pretty good choices either way.
    I guess I will need to save more to afford the Fantom Pro DS to keep up if the consensus here is the Fantom DS Comp or Trail is not going to serve me well since they are below $1,500.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarolinaLL6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    960
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I guess I will need to save more to afford the Fantom Pro DS to keep up if the consensus here is the Fantom DS Comp or Trail is not going to serve me well since they are below $1,500.
    The $ amount is a general rule I've seen pop up in several threads. For specifics I would ask in the Moto forum.
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,655
    Dare to be different 2012 Jamis Nemesis 650

    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I guess I will need to save more to afford the Fantom Pro DS to keep up if the consensus here is the Fantom DS Comp or Trail is not going to serve me well since they are below $1,500.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: erginguney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    974
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I guess I will need to save more to afford the Fantom Pro DS to keep up if the consensus here is the Fantom DS Comp or Trail is not going to serve me well since they are below $1,500.
    I think that's a general fuzzy guideline. It's not a delineation that's sharp enough to differentiate between similar models of the same given manufacturer. You might want to base your decision on other specifics of the component set and specs, if you've narrowed your choice down to two models from a single brand.
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by erginguney View Post
    I think that's a general fuzzy guideline. It's not a delineation that's sharp enough to differentiate between similar models of the same given manufacturer. You might want to base your decision on other specifics of the component set and specs, if you've narrowed your choice down to two models from a single brand.
    I thought like you originally, but was advised more firmly about the $1,500 guideline.

    What is confusing is that I can get better components for less on Bikes Direct. For example, if I get a FS like the Fantom Comp DS, it has components equal to a $2,500 to 3,000 bike from Kona, Ellsworth, Trek and Specialized and with maybe lesser components, yet the Fantom Comp DS is $1,100.

    I also thought with lockouts I can do uphills equal to a HT and have the luxury of FS for downhill.

  31. #31
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,118
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I thought like you originally, but was advised more firmly about the $1,500 guideline.

    What is confusing is that I can get better components for less on Bikes Direct. For example, if I get a FS like the Fantom Comp DS, it has components equal to a $2,500 to 3,000 bike from Kona, Ellsworth, Trek and Specialized and with maybe lesser components, yet the Fantom Comp DS is $1,100.

    I also thought with lockouts I can do uphills equal to a HT and have the luxury of FS for downhill.
    Better components but a worse frame; that's where they save the bulk of their money on these BD.com bikes. The quality isn't great and the designs are looking a bit dated these days but they're not bad bikes.

    Personally I would skip a full suspension bike of questionable quality that you are unable to test ride and go for a good quality hardtail from a LBS that you are able to be sized on and test ride to make sure it's what you want to spend your money on.

    Better parts stuck on a frame doesn't mean you'll like riding the bike better. Every bike fits differently and feels different and I would highly recommend buying a bike that you are able to test ride. If you must buy a full suspension bike, buy used from Craigslist after a test ride. I wouldn't trust lucking out on a bike from the internet if it were my money.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    I am having a hard time believing the frames for the bike I listed are worst or inferior unless I was at a racer level. For an intermediate moving to advance, I think they may be fine unless I am missing something.
    2012 Niner Jet 9 RDO (Tang, XTR groupo)
    2011 Giant Reign 2 (XT groupo)

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpeters's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,330
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    I am having a hard time believing the frames for the bike I listed are worst or inferior unless I was at a racer level. For an intermediate moving to advance, I think they may be fine unless I am missing something.

    The frame will be great for starters no problem. The thing is if you decide later you don't like the frame just get a new one you will have a great set of parts to switch over. Mountain bikes are like a money pit you throw money in and it never comes back out just so you know. But it is ok because they are fun get.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by jpeters View Post
    The frame will be great for starters no problem. The thing is if you decide later you don't like the frame just get a new one you will have a great set of parts to switch over. Mountain bikes are like a money pit you throw money in and it never comes back out just so you know. But it is ok because they are fun get.
    This was my original thinking. Without being in the sport for a while, I don't know if I will be fine with the FS component set on the $600, $800, or $1,100.

    My biggest worry is shifting on uphills and having a suspension that will last with my 225 lbs.

    I think the my girlfriend will be satisfied with the $600 FS model.
    2012 Niner Jet 9 RDO (Tang, XTR groupo)
    2011 Giant Reign 2 (XT groupo)

  35. #35
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,118
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    This was my original thinking. Without being in the sport for a while, I don't know if I will be fine with the FS component set on the $600, $800, or $1,100.

    My biggest worry is shifting on uphills and having a suspension that will last with my 225 lbs.

    I think the my girlfriend will be satisfied with the $600 FS model.
    You get exactly what you pay for so take the advice you get however you'd like. When you read over and over across all forum sections that you shouldn't touch a FS bike under $1000 I figure you might pick up on things, but do what you want. There's a lot of very experienced people on this board who try and steer people in the smartest direction, personally I would suggest that you stick with a hardtail, there's nothing wrong with riding a hardtail.

    Shifting under pressure (i.e. uphill) won't work no matter how expensive the parts are you are trying it with (well, one blatant exception is the Hammerschmidt crank). Try and practice getting up a little momentum and just spinning while you change gears or try and change gears before you get to that steep hill.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ldollard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    You get exactly what you pay for so take the advice you get however you'd like. When you read over and over across all forum sections that you shouldn't touch a FS bike under $1000 I figure you might pick up on things, but do what you want. There's a lot of very experienced people on this board who try and steer people in the smartest direction, personally I would suggest that you stick with a hardtail, there's nothing wrong with riding a hardtail.

    Shifting under pressure (i.e. uphill) won't work no matter how expensive the parts are you are trying it with (well, one blatant exception is the Hammerschmidt crank). Try and practice getting up a little momentum and just spinning while you change gears or try and change gears before you get to that steep hill.
    In my experience you dont shift if you can help it cycling uphill, you shift beforehand, by getting the greatest amount of momentum before you hit the hill.

    I also totally agree with the NO FS below $1000 or tbh for any money, unless you absolutely need to have it for your sport.

    Even if you can lock out the rear shock, it'll still add significant weight to your bike and saps skill and leads to a sense of false confidence. You'll have a lot more control on a hardtail as well. I know FS looks cool, but it saps energy, degrades experience and skill. And sorry but I would double this warning for a female (its not sexist just common sense). She will not thank you for giving her a tank, oh and not to mention there are more parts to break.

    Put it this way, if you had two cars that where exactly the same and one had a 400hp engine and the other a 150hp engine, but everything else was the same including the price, wouldn't you be suspicious of the 400hp one and what they had to do to give you that extra power?

    Its the same thing, I had a diamond back FS it was a nice solid bike, but it was heavy as sin, i hated it, i rode it once... once because i hated it so much so i sold it 2 weeks later...

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Thanks for all the insight everyone! This will be a very valuable discussion for others to review.

    So, I guess I will spend money on getting lighter and show off that I can lift my bike with one finger.

    I think the girlfriend will appreciate lightness too.

    What contributes the most weight component-wise outside of frame? Is there a rule of thumb where to spend money first. second on components for a hard-tail?

    My thinking it is in decending order:
    Forks
    Derailers
    Gears
    Bars
    pedals
    levers

    Not sure about tires and tubes.

    Also, should 29er be considered or is that a fad?

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ldollard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    Thanks for all the insight everyone! This will be a very valuable discussion for others to review.

    So, I guess I will spend money on getting lighter and show off that I can lift my bike with one finger.

    I think the girlfriend will appreciate lightness too.

    What contributes the most weight component-wise outside of frame? Is there a rule of thumb where to spend money first. second on components for a hard-tail?

    My thinking it is in decending order:
    Forks
    Derailers
    Gears
    Bars
    pedals
    levers

    Not sure about tires and tubes.

    Also, should 29er be considered or is that a fad?
    personally the first thing i change are pedals, usually these are the cheapest components on bikes and thus the weakest... its not fun standing up on cheap pedals and having them snap with the bike flying on top of you and the road or track taking its pound of flesh....

  39. #39
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,118
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    What contributes the most weight component-wise outside of frame? Is there a rule of thumb where to spend money first. second on components for a hard-tail?


    Also, should 29er be considered or is that a fad?
    I think you'll be making the right choice going with hardtail bikes. 29ers should be considered, but I would give one a test ride before you make up your mind. They have advantages and disadvantages, generally more advantages for very tall riders and more disadvantages for short riders. Personally, I would start on 26" wheels; the wheels will be built stronger and the bikes will probably have a lower center of gravity making learning a little more forgiving. Not to say people don't learn riding well on 29ers, I would just recommend starting 26".

    Rule of thumb typically dictates that the best bang for your buck performance to dollar is in the wheels. Weight wise, the fork is probably a good place to start but in order to make a significant weight savings may cost you as much as the whole bike does. Might I suggest just riding the bike as is and saving your money to replace the parts that you break or wear out? Also remember that you get a much better use of your money by buying complete bikes with better parts on them from the start instead of buying a frame for the express purpose of upgrading.

    Above all, if the bike doesn't fit you (and the other bike, your girlfriend) you will not ride it. Do yourself a favor and go test ride some bikes. What you loose in flashy parts on a no name frame you make up for by ensuring that you fit and enjoy the bike you do end up buying. Leave the internet bike buying for your next bike when you might know what you're really looking for.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,655
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    Thanks for all the insight everyone! This will be a very valuable discussion for others to review.

    So, I guess I will spend money on getting lighter and show off that I can lift my bike with one finger.

    I think the girlfriend will appreciate lightness too.

    What contributes the most weight component-wise outside of frame? Is there a rule of thumb where to spend money first. second on components for a hard-tail?

    My thinking it is in decending order:
    Forks
    Derailers
    Gears
    Bars
    pedals
    levers

    Not sure about tires and tubes.

    Also, should 29er be considered or is that a fad?
    It's not just about weight, even on my $3500 2000 SWORKS FSR I hated the front fork, it was a Manitou Carbon Light - all about being light and basically sucked. Bike rode better when I went with a Rock Shox Psylo which way more but was a better fork.
    It was like having a new bike.

    I good wheelset was the same feeling. Pancaked a front wheel, used it as a excuse to buy a custom build wheelset using King hubs, Mavic rims and DT Swiss spokes.

    Riding the same trails I found myself catching my riding buddy while coasting on some of the downhill sections. never did that before.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,655
    Duffin-

    Just saw this on fleebay, may before worth watching for you. Check out sizing on the Santa Cruz's website.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/2007-Santa-Cruz-...item3369e6e93f
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarolinaLL6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    960
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    What contributes the most weight component-wise outside of frame? Is there a rule of thumb where to spend money first. second on components for a hard-tail?

    My thinking it is in decending order:
    Forks
    Derailers
    Gears
    Bars
    pedals
    levers

    Not sure about tires and tubes.
    It's the wheel/tire combo. An added benefit is it has the greatest effect on your performance.

    If you want to get an idea of how component weight can be minimized hang out in the WW forum and see what effects the weight of the bike and how expensive it can be.
    Mike
    2011 Moto Fly Pro

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,425
    I think alot of people are getting way to hung up on price. Ive been shopping for a entry level easy on the pocket XC bike for months trying to figure out what I wanted. The selections i looked at included the following....

    Hard Tails
    2011 Specialized Hard Rock Disc Sport $529 @ LBS
    2011 Trek 3700 Disc $549 @ LBS (But the owner said hed not only match the specialized price, but beat it by $10)
    2011 Raleigh Talus 4.0 Disc $529 @ LBS
    FS
    2010 Jamis Dakar XC Sport $649 @ JensonUSA (I probably would have bought this, but they ran out of 19's before I pulled the trigger
    2011 Jamis Dakar XC Sport $980 @ LBS
    2011 Giant Yukon FX Disc $950 @ LBS



    I decided on the 2011 Yukon, but when I called the bike shop to tell them id be in to buy it on saturday he informed me he had one last 2010 in a 19 left on the showroom floor for sale for $850, and since there was a sale going on he'd take 10% off the $850. After it was all said and done I bought the 2010 (which actually had slightly better components than the 2011) for $778.26 out the door. So even new bikes can be had for deals. What you need to look at is the specific bike, with the specific component list, and that specific price tag. You will ultimately end up deciding exactly how much you are willing to spend for how much bike. However, the trails I ride arent all that technical and most of the guys I ride with started on $400 hardtails and rode them for a few years before they upgraded so I have a feeling I'll do just fine.


    Moral: Dont price shop, bike shop then decide if you can pay that much or not.



    Also, dont be afraid to haggle a little on the bike with your LBS. If your budget is $850 and th bike is $890 talk to them and see if they'll do $850, or maybe $890 with a piece of gear like a camelbak or a helmet.

  44. #44
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,118
    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    Moral: Dont price shop, bike shop then decide if you can pay that much or not.
    This should be the answer to every "what bike should I buy?" question.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    44
    I feel buy what suits you best, i just bought a 2011 Giant Revel 1 i know its a entry level mountain bike and thats about as much mountain biking im gonna be doing for now. I really didnt/don't see the need to buy a 1k bike if im not gonna be doing major trailing at this point. In the future im sure i will and by then i'll get a newer bike to be able to handle the kind of riding im gonna be doing

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: erginguney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    974
    Quote Originally Posted by duffin View Post
    Also, should 29er be considered or is that a fad?
    A quick note on 29ers: They bring some disadvantages in addition to their advantages. The examples that are good enough to feature very few (or none) of the disadvantages while still providing all of the advantages will be the higher end 29ers. So, when you're shopping for a bike at a rock-bottom price range, any 29ers you'll find in that price range are fairly certain to be carrying the worst of the disadvantages (e.g., weight, sluggishness, low durability of wheels, problems with geometry and clearances). So, be careful.

    It's basically like the way you're better off buying a hardtail rather than a full-suspension at a given low price level. A full-suspension model brings some overhead (shock absorber, extra linkages, bearings, and the technicalities of an efficient suspension geometry) on top of a plain 26-incher hardtail. Those bring extra cost overhead. A 29er also brings additional overhead (the challenge of making larger wheels durable and laterally stiff; the placement challenges of the seat stay, front derailler, and the pedals / your heels, right around the bottom bracket; a fork selection from a smaller variety of models; the need for lighter wheel designs/materials in order not to make the wheels proportionally more sluggish). So, similarly, you'd be getting a much better bike if you get a 26er at any given price level than a 29er at that same price.
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by erginguney View Post
    A quick note on 29ers: They bring some disadvantages in addition to their advantages. The examples that are good enough to feature very few (or none) of the disadvantages while still providing all of the advantages will be the higher end 29ers. So, when you're shopping for a bike at a rock-bottom price range, any 29ers you'll find in that price range are fairly certain to be carrying the worst of the disadvantages (e.g., weight, sluggishness, low durability of wheels, problems with geometry and clearances). So, be careful.

    It's basically like the way you're better off buying a hardtail rather than a full-suspension at a given low price level. A full-suspension model brings some overhead (shock absorber, extra linkages, bearings, and the technicalities of an efficient suspension geometry) on top of a plain 26-incher hardtail. Those bring extra cost overhead. A 29er also brings additional overhead (the challenge of making larger wheels durable and laterally stiff; the placement challenges of the seat stay, front derailler, and the pedals / your heels, right around the bottom bracket; a fork selection from a smaller variety of models; the need for lighter wheel designs/materials in order not to make the wheels proportionally more sluggish). So, similarly, you'd be getting a much better bike if you get a 26er at any given price level than a 29er at that same price.
    Well said! I think I have a bead on a 26" trek on Craigslist for phase on of my comeback. More later.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by erginguney View Post
    A quick note on 29ers: They bring some disadvantages in addition to their advantages. The examples that are good enough to feature very few (or none) of the disadvantages while still providing all of the advantages will be the higher end 29ers. So, when you're shopping for a bike at a rock-bottom price range, any 29ers you'll find in that price range are fairly certain to be carrying the worst of the disadvantages (e.g., weight, sluggishness, low durability of wheels, problems with geometry and clearances). So, be careful.

    It's basically like the way you're better off buying a hardtail rather than a full-suspension at a given low price level. A full-suspension model brings some overhead (shock absorber, extra linkages, bearings, and the technicalities of an efficient suspension geometry) on top of a plain 26-incher hardtail. Those bring extra cost overhead. A 29er also brings additional overhead (the challenge of making larger wheels durable and laterally stiff; the placement challenges of the seat stay, front derailler, and the pedals / your heels, right around the bottom bracket; a fork selection from a smaller variety of models; the need for lighter wheel designs/materials in order not to make the wheels proportionally more sluggish). So, similarly, you'd be getting a much better bike if you get a 26er at any given price level than a 29er at that same price.
    Well said! I think I have a bead on a 26" trek on Craigslist for phase one of my comeback. More later.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    255
    Well, I closed the deal.

    Phase One is to ride XC trails on a cheaper bike until my cardio us up and my skills need better equipment. Plus girlfriend needs time to catchup.

    Thank you all for your help. Now you get to rip my deal.

    Craigslist $300
    New, and I mean new. Old man won it in a raffle and never road it. Sat in box in his garage.

    Trek 6500 SL, 21.5"
    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...6500&Type=bike
    (Minus disc brakes in picture - I got pad brakes)

    I wonder what the first upgrade will be?

    My bet are the forks -1-1/8" x 10" tube.

    Suggestions based on the above link?

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,425
    Ride it and dont upgrade it unless something breaks, save your money up for a next level bike.

Similar Threads

  1. Dirt Bikes to Mountain Bikes?
    By mm9 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-15-2010, 05:07 AM
  2. Replies: 53
    Last Post: 03-18-2010, 10:48 PM
  3. New to Mountain bikes!
    By T/C in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-01-2009, 10:42 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-22-2009, 04:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •