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  1. #501
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    This is going to be a very useful thread for when I get to riding again. I can't believe how unprepared I used to be. All I used to bring with me was water and music.

  2. #502
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    Good stuff.

  3. #503
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    What I carry on every normal ride usually 1-3 hours

    On the bike...
    Insulated Water Bottle
    Mini Pump
    Under Saddle Bag w/patch kit, tire levers, CO2 gun with 2 carts

    In hydration pack (2 liter)
    Spare tube
    Multi Tool (includes chain breaker)
    Cliff Bar/Energy Gel
    Poncho/Plastic bag (Poncho for me, bag for cell phone/wallet etc)
    2 extra CO2 carts

    New personal rule... If I start a ride that I haven't done before and unfamiliar with after 12pm... Taking the bike light.

    Gear
    Helmet
    Gloves
    Bike Shorts
    Last edited by vanwo23; 09-27-2012 at 09:56 AM.
    14' Specialized Crave

    13' Trek Superfly100 AL Elite - Sold
    06' Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc - Sold

  4. #504
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    Nice list, I've never needed my head light, but I wouldn't ride without it. There is nothing quite like a 3-hour tour.

  5. #505
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    You know what would be nice is if some company sold complete "ride kits" in various levels of included equipment and supplies.
    I know it would be difficult because everyone has their own preferences and bikes of course, but it would be pretty cool to just be able to go a buy a complete, ready to pack and ride kit.

  6. #506
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    Very good

  7. #507
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    Be sure your first aid kid has iodine or some other form of sterilization, infections are nasty bits of work
    If I get sad I stop being sad and start being awesome

  8. #508
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    read

  9. #509
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    Thanks for the info y'all

  10. #510
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    Thanks

  11. #511
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    Thanks.

  12. #512
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    Awesome! Thanks for the info

  13. #513
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    Water and a first aid kit for all rides. Depending on how long your ride is going to be and how many in your group, you can distribute the repair tools and parts.

  14. #514
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    I'm such a pack rat. I can't seem to stop myself carrying enough to survive a disaster on the side of a mountain... even though most of the time I'm just on local trails.

  15. #515
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    I think its better to be prepared and not need it than to need it and not have it.

    I actually do carry a really small survival pack with me just to stay in the habit of having with me at all times.

    Just curious - how much does all this stuff weigh? (not including water of course). Tubes, pumps, tools, bag(s), FAK...my hiking backpack (for 1-3 hr hikes) weighs at about 15lbs.

  16. #516
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    I forgot to mention - I took a Wilderness First Aid class held by the Red Cross a few years ago - those of you who would like more first aid info; I HIGHLY recommend it. Most of the folks who backpack and camp counselors take this course, but it is really designed for folks who will be 45min. away from a hospital. When you're on a trail and something serious happens, 911 isn't going to get you very quickly (especially if cell phone coverage is spotty).

    For rides more than half a day, at a minimum I would carry something like the REI Dayhiker first aid kit, then supplement it. There are lots of YouTube videos on first aid kits.

    If all you know how to do is stick a bandaid on, I think you'll find the wilderness first aid course to be very useful on how to use a first aid kit and in what situations.

  17. #517
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    If I am gonna be out for an hour or moreduring the summer I take this.

    Still needed are another form of ID & ICE instructions, ID tags, spare link, snake bit & bee sting kit. stowable jacket and solar blanket. Still need some armor for my knees and elbows and pelvis. I see lots of things here that I'll really look into because its better to have it and not need it than it is to need it and not have it. Already added a few things that I didnt have b4.

    In my Hydration Pack/Backpack.

    1 12hr green light stick.
    Recon Tanto CS, tied upside down on the right side, accessible w/o removing packing.
    20 feet of 550 paracord
    Some precut strips Tyvek envelope, very tough. Consider for use with a sidewall gash/large hole in tire that I have to use a tube for that Stans wont seal. I am not walking if I dont have to.
    Co2 cylinders
    patch kits
    Chain breaker
    Multi tool for bike
    29er Tube
    Green flashing strobe light/built in whistle
    tire levers (3)
    Energy Gel
    Nuun electrolite tablets
    Candy-for low sugar
    zip ties
    camo compact w/ mirror
    Duct tape
    magnesium & striker
    First aid kit don't have any H2o2 or iodine but most everything else. Feminine pads & tampons for blood loss only, I have some medical training that Uncle Sam taught me. ETA: I got some liquid bandage with antiseptic and a Snake & bee sting/bite kit.

    My back pack without water weighs in at 5lbs. Water is a consumable, its weight is not relevant.
    I leave my route with someone and let them know I'll be back before dark, if not start looking.

    On me at all times:
    Some form of a handgun for snakes and dangerous animals 2 & 4 legged kinds(CCW) We have Mountain Lions & Black Bear. Confronted by a black bear 2x I was scared
    Gloves
    Helmet
    Safety yellow reflective vest
    Rear view helmet mirror
    Flashing front/rear lights-Clear & Red
    Cell phone
    Padded shorts
    Do-Rag

    Will be interesting to see what the winter ride brings whether I need to make changes or not, I havent ridden in the winter yet, just have my summer pack made out- because I just started biking.
    Last edited by SlickWilly8019; 10-26-2012 at 12:36 PM. Reason: updates

  18. #518
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    good idea

  19. #519
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    These beginner stickies are extremely helpful!

  20. #520
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    I didn't read all 21 pages, but I'm hoping somebody mentioned extra ammo! One clip is never enough
    Bone stock 2012 Trek Cobia

  21. #521
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    Not sure if its been mentioned but I discovered today that some toilet paper would be good to have in the pack.

    Hoping to get my ccw soon too to add to my survivalist items.

  22. #522
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    good stuff

  23. #523
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    Ankle weights for training, water bottle

  24. #524
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    Anybody can recommend a good multitool with chain breaker?

  25. #525
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    This has been an informative thread. good sticky.

  26. #526
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbowho View Post
    Dental floss. I know it's good for what it's intended for. A Cliff bar can wreak havic if stuck in the tooth.

    But!!! A one inch 1000 ft! spool is good for many other options. Like stringing a bush to bush space blanket hanger. The stuff is beyond strong and weighs nothing. Never needed it but some Desert racing Gal suggested it so I carry it.
    new to this thread, but on a local forum a hardcore biker said he uses dental floss and a needle to repair tears in the sidewalls of tubeless tires. Once you have sewn the tear, you can install a patch and the tire will hold tubeless. He said dont use the waxy glide floss though, it is too slick.

  27. #527
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    good thread thanks

  28. #528
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    This thread helped me alot on my first ride, luckily I saw this before I went out and took all the right stuff, thanks to the OP.

  29. #529
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    Useful info . thanks

  30. #530
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    Thanks, this is a helpful checklist!

  31. #531
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    why didn't i think of that?

    walkie-talkies (GRMS?) for everyone - spare batteries. brilliant - should have thought of that myself. another thread to print, save in a 3-ring binder, and read before my next ride.

    thanks, jim.

  32. #532
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    a take the basic: pump, patches, levers and multitool.. thats all folks!

  33. #533
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    Quote Originally Posted by jan_nikolajsen View Post
    Alien2 with chain breaker and pedal wrench etc.
    Pump, presta/schrader compatible.
    2 tubes.
    Zip ties
    Tire levers
    Patch kit - unopened glue.
    Fiber spoke. Will repair even rear drive side without tools.
    Derailleur cable
    Derailleur hanger
    Brake pads
    Chain links
    Quick link
    Small flashlight
    Matches
    Duct tape
    Electrolyte tablets
    Pain killers
    Small Leatherman with pliers

    Might seem like a lot, but where do you ride? Around here there's thousands of acres of empty space, with no cell reception. In the off-season I see no one all day. The walk out could be really long.

    It's also good to be able to assist others.
    Haha so many pain killers.
    Anyway, for a short one or two hour ride, would you recommend still taking all that stuff?

  34. #534
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    I ain't got half that stuff. Better start buying and packin'

  35. #535
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    Nice, I've been wanting to get a list.

  36. #536
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    Great resource!

  37. #537
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    My riding load out consists of: extra tube, pump, patch kit, some energy gel, tire irons, camelback, shock pump, always carry my iPhone,and wallet with ID.

  38. #538
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    usefull!

  39. #539
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    Helpful thread ! I think the full list of packing might be a bit much though

  40. #540
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    Amazing must-haves. I never considered taking the majority of things suggested. I'm a complete newbie and glaringly clear I have a long way to go before I understand the sport. LOL - Moving from beach cruisers and boardwalk rides to mountain biking is a huge leap but it's going to be fun!

  41. #541
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    Useful info. Thanks

  42. #542
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    very useful great thanks

  43. #543
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    very helpfull

  44. #544
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    Now that it is starting to get really hot, I have also added some ORS (hydrolyte) to my stash of gear.
    Dehydration can come on really quickly if you are focusing too hard on the ride, and not on your body or your mates. I have had one friend already stop sweating on a ride this summer. He didnt even realise he had stopped sweating or how bad it was until after the ride and he fell over trying to put his bike in the car.

    Plonked him in the shade, dumped a heap of water over him and pumped him full of fluids and he started to get some colour again. His parter came and took him home and threw him in the shower, pumped him full of more ORS and then headed off to the docs for a check up.

    Dehydration is serious. If you are riding where it gets really hot, I highly recommend some ORS in the pack. Doesnt weight much, but can be a saviour for you or your riding partner.

    I have also been effected by dehydration from a ride. Took me almost 2 weeks to recover and I was nowhere near as bad as my mate. This was from a ride I drank a heap on too.
    Burning fat, not oil.

  45. #545
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    Just an observation after reading through a few lists: while it is important to have the essential materials and that it is better to be over prepared than under prepared (I learned this the hard way) it is also important to keep your pack light. A heavy pack is going to wear you down and slow you down.

  46. #546
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    You guys seem to bring a lot of "interesting" things. :P.

  47. #547
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    thats a great post chris. i really think that a sticky like this would be helpful to all newbs

  48. #548
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    So, master bike fixer, what would you do with this real life on the trail situation? We decided there was no real on-trail fix, but the guys were ready to dismantle the brakes on someone's second bike when we got back to the campground. I voted to go home.

    running a mechanical avid disc brake? Id be sure that I bought the avid levers that are reversible. if I brake the rear lever, no big deal ,front does bulk of the stopping. if I brake the front, stop on the trail and swap the lever over.

  49. #549
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    Thank you very much for this handy list!! Awesome!

  50. #550
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    running a mechanical avid disc brake? Id be sure that I bought the avid levers that are reversible. if I brake the rear lever, no big deal ,front does bulk of the stopping. if I brake the front, stop on the trail and swap the lever over.
    You do bulk of your braking with the front? I grew up racing BMX so maybe that's why I'd rather have a working rear brake over front any day. Just do a little footjam if you need to front brake in a hurry anyways

  51. #551
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    Quote Originally Posted by p2rider426 View Post
    You do bulk of your braking with the front? I grew up racing BMX so maybe that's why I'd rather have a working rear brake over front any day. Just do a little footjam if you need to front brake in a hurry anyways
    Front does 70% of braking but yeah sometimes you just want to scrub a little speed off so you use the rear. Regardless the same thing applies with the levers.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  52. #552
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    its good

  53. #553
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    very helpful, thanks a lot

  54. #554
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    Thanks i learned my lesson,,, Pinch flat from hell. had to walk a mile home sucks for me lesson learned.

  55. #555
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    Thanks

    helpful thanks

  56. #556
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    helpful thanks

  57. #557
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    My to bring list

    Here is my list:
    - multi tools
    - tube
    - plastic lever
    - bottle of water
    - mini pump
    - zip ties
    - GU

    and the most usefull of all: I bring my riding partner that bring all the stuff above.
    I just bring my cell, wallet and car key.

    Happy trails.

  58. #558
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    I always try to be sure and bring one of these...


  59. #559
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    good stuff

  60. #560
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    As a dirt bike rider i have been trained on always riding with items to get you out of a pinch. First week out on my first MTB ride, I had a flat, and then a broken chain. Had everything to get me back up and running both times. Great post, great job.

  61. #561
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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mountain Bike Ride Packing List-sparebike.jpg  


  63. #563
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    Great

  64. #564
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris130 View Post
    That is a great idea.

    Here's my $0.02.

    Things to absolutely buy before riding:
    -- Good, quality helmet (non-negotiable)
    -- Some way to carry water (bottle or camelbak).

    Things that are definitely recommended before riding:
    -- Bike shorts
    -- A CamelBak-type product to carry both water and gear
    -- Spare tubes
    -- Tire levers (2)
    -- A quality mini-pump (don't skimp with a cheap one, trust me)
    -- Tube patch kit
    -- Good, quality minitool (Topeak Alien II, Crank Bros, or Park Tool offer nice ones)
    -- Gloves

    Other things that I've learned the hard way to keep in my hydro pack:
    -- Energy gel or some other form of anti-bonk
    -- Handi wipes and/or a little bottle of purell - makes cleaning hands easy for repairs or first aid
    -- Those small alcohol pads that you get with other stuff - good to clean tubes for patches and are nice for first aid
    -- Some form of basic ID w/ pertinent medical info
    -- Cell phone (reception capabilities permitting)
    -- Spare chain links, PowerLinks (2), & a good chain-breaker tool (if not on minitool)
    -- A spare rear derailleur hanger
    -- A comprehensive first aid kit (such as a hiker kit from REI, etc)
    -- Zip-ties in assorted sizes
    -- A coupla feet of duct tape (just fold it around itself for a nice compact package)
    -- Bug juice
    -- Shock pump (optional)
    -- Small but powerful flashlight (you never know!)
    -- Pliers - I keep a small, cheapie Leatherman knockoff in my pack. It works for the few occassions I need it.
    -- Spoke wrench (if not on minitool)
    -- Some cash
    -- Some form of a sharp blade.

    I'm sure others will have great ideas; I'm undoubtedly forgetting something...

    Cheers, Chris

    Thanks for the info!

  65. #565
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    cool pics

  66. #566
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    this is very useful, do you carry these in a back pack or camel pack?

  67. #567
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    Very good info...I am leaning towards carrying gear in a CamelBak.

  68. #568
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    Very useful

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    Very helpful post - I feel more prepared now!

  70. #570
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    How about a minimalist packing list?

    This is a great thread for people who are bike-camping or way out in the wilderness. But, we spend big bucks on weight savings, so there is reason to be selective in what you bring along.

    So how about making a list of the few but most important things to bring?

    Where I ride, the longest push I would have to get to a road where someone could pick me up is about 2 miles, and in most cases, well less than a mile.

    For now I am carrying a short 4mm & 5mm Allen wrench (used once in a year of riding to tighten my cleats), the key to my car, some energy gel, and water. I don't skimp on water but am getting better at knowing how much to bring for a given ride and given weather conditions. I needed to tweak a limit screw once, so am thinking about filing a screwdriver bit onto my key or just getting a little screwdriver. A few zip ties make sense too -- they weigh nothing.

    I am tubeless, so don't worry about the unlikely flat.

    I usually carry my cell phone because of work, but often don't if I want to be left alone. I always tell Wife what park I am going to if I will be riding alone.

  71. #571
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    Very helpful thanks!

  72. #572
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    A solid multitool with pliers is a great way to cover off a lot the the things mentioned in the above lists.

    Something I did not see mentioned is a spare pair of socks. Preferably thin wool or silk, which are great at wicking away moisture and prevent blisters. I'd switch out pairs at lunch or halfway through a ride, especially when it's hot.

  73. #573
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-88 View Post
    Be sure your first aid kid has iodine or some other form of sterilization, infections are nasty bits of work
    This is good advice. I have a friend who died from blood poisoning from a suspected thorn prick just 3 weeks after the event. Left a wife and year old twins behind.

  74. #574
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    Quote Originally Posted by AREK28 View Post
    Anybody can recommend a good multitool with chain breaker?
    Crank Brothers Tool 19

  75. #575
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    Great information.

  76. #576
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    Got some good ideas on here. Thanks

  77. #577
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    Thank you. All of the beginners info on this forum are really helpful and I very much appreciate all the effort that has gone into it.

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    thanks for the ideas. sub'd

  79. #579
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    Just scanning - along with the first aid kit, you need the knowledge to use it. A Wilderness First Aid or First Responder class goes a long way to taking care of people and yourself. Google SOLO schools or Outward Bound.

    To most people's first aid kits, I would make a few additions/changes.

    Meds - not for any ride less than a few hours. No Tylenol, no Advil, and absolutely no aspirin (slows clotting). Those are for long term use not on the trail. Up to a point, pain is good - it lets you localize the injury.

    Add a triangle bandage and some Kerlix or ACE bandage (but don't wrap too tight) for slings, swathes, and tying splints (use branches to make the splint).

    Add nitrile gloves! You may be using your first aid kit on a buddy and not yourself. No need to share blood and germs.

    Survival blanket. Folded up they are maybe 4" x 3" x 1". Good for someone stranded for hours due to a mishap.

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    Be sure your first aid kid has iodine or some other form of sterilization, infections are nasty bits of work
    This is good advice. I have a friend who died from blood poisoning from a suspected thorn prick just 3 weeks after the event. Left a wife and year old twins behind.
    I'm so sorry that happened. Wounds should always be cleaned as part of definitive care, but not necessarily on the trail. Really, sterilization is almost impossible outside a hospital surgery room. Ambulances are not sterile, but they are supposed to be clean. Concern about infection is very low in the first hour or so - it's more important to deal with life threats, stop bleeding, and get out. If it will take a few hours to get you or a buddy out, rinsing the wound is very good. Iodine and antibiotic cream should be used if you can get the wound truly clean and properly bandaged (as you learn in a WFA/WFR course). A thick antibiotic cream might only be putting a water resistant layer over the bacteria, keeping it moist and warm and happy.

    I have zero experience or training with Quick Clot or military dressings with clotting chemicals on them. I personally wouldn't use them if bleeding can be controlled with direct pressure.

  80. #580
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlickWilly8019 View Post
    Some form of a handgun for snakes and dangerous animals 2 & 4 legged kinds(CCW)
    I have to agree with this one. It's rare that I am away from the house without at least a subcompact 9mm and spare mag. In the woods even more so.

  81. #581
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    This thread isn't just useful for beginners. It's also good for those of us who are returning after a long hiatus and can't remember what we use to carry.

  82. #582
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post


    I'm so sorry that happened. Wounds should always be cleaned as part of definitive care, but not necessarily on the trail. Really, sterilization is almost impossible outside a hospital surgery room. Ambulances are not sterile, but they are supposed to be clean. Concern about infection is very low in the first hour or so - it's more important to deal with life threats, stop bleeding, and get out. If it will take a few hours to get you or a buddy out, rinsing the wound is very good. Iodine and antibiotic cream should be used if you can get the wound truly clean and properly bandaged (as you learn in a WFA/WFR course). A thick antibiotic cream might only be putting a water resistant layer over the bacteria, keeping it moist and warm and happy.

    I have zero experience or training with Quick Clot or military dressings with clotting chemicals on them. I personally wouldn't use them if bleeding can be controlled with direct pressure.
    high-percentage zinc ointment.
    Amazon.com: Bacitracin Zinc Ointment 1 Oz / 28 G (Pack of 4): Health & Personal Care

    Or hydrogen peroxide in a small squeeze bottle. The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid. Then apply the ointment, and bandage if wanted/needed to keep blood from getting on stuff. Repeat and let it air out once at home (no bandage).

  83. #583
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    I'm always going to be a new at this sport.

    I don't keep a ton on me, but an emergency blanket definitely helps.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

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    at least i can prepare some stuff before off to the road

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    high-percentage zinc ointment.
    Amazon.com: Bacitracin Zinc Ointment 1 Oz / 28 G (Pack of 4): Health & Personal Care

    Or hydrogen peroxide in a small squeeze bottle. The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid. Then apply the ointment, and bandage if wanted/needed to keep blood from getting on stuff. Repeat and let it air out once at home (no bandage).
    I'll look into the Zinc Bacitracin. Thanks.

    Be aware that hydrogen peroxide can scar - it kills some of your cells along with the bacteria. It also hurts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post

    Be aware that hydrogen peroxide can scar - it kills some of your cells along with the bacteria.
    Track cred with your buddies

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    Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory lasts forever. Mountain bike rides get more epic with each re-telling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post
    Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory lasts forever. Mountain bike rides get more epic with each re-telling.
    I have a scar on my chin that I used to try to hide, but I've grown used to it and I actually kind of like it now. It's slowly going away though. And my story isn't very epic. I was just being stupid and riding over my head.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

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    this is awesome good thing i bought most of this stuff

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    This is a great thread! Gives good insight to ideas of items to bring on the trail. I always have gear on me from a small first aid kit, to a BOB in my car, and to a GOOD tote at home. Some really good ideas about items to keep on a person off in the woods riding.

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    I am just posting this because I need to make 5 posts before I am allowed to create a new thread on the forum.

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    Great thread. Thanks for sharing.

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    thanks for the ideas. great stuff.

  94. #594
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    Great suggestions, just getting back into riding and will definitely be putting together a 'must take list'!

  95. #595
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    Good Stuff

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid.
    Something I learned in home brewing "you can't sterilise a turd". Meaning something has to be clean before it can be sterilised.

    For what it's worth. Great thread, thanks everyone.

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    awesome! answers to questions I've had.

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    Thanks for the info.

  99. #599
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    Good Stuff

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spifficus View Post
    A couple of safety pins, for temp repairs of torn Camelbak straps, broken zippers, etc.
    thumbs up for the safety pins. very nice to have when your hydration pack or seat bag is falling apart

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