1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #101
    SSolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Specialized Kid
    One question I did have that I did not see mentioned. Is there a quick fix for those with hydralic brakes? Perhaps a few feet of line and a small bottle of fluid? Or should I not even worry about it?

    Good question....anybody?
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  2. #102
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    Oh, and on your way to work, don't forget the spare car..

  3. #103
    Rod
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    From my experience most of these lists are way too extensive for most of my rides. I do usually 1-3 hour rides. For those I carry my multi tool that has all the allen wrenches, aka hex keys, for my bike, it includes a chain tool, tire levers and other things I've never used. I also carry a spare tube or two depending on the ride, my co2 pump, and co2 cartridges. Sometimes if I'm doing a hammer fest with the fellas I'll take a gu or two. I always take water as well.

    My going into the middle of no where list is a little more extensive. I take all of the above in a hydro pack, map, more water of course, apple, cliff bar, peanuts possibly, first aid kit, and sometimes my cell phone. Oh and I usually carry some cash. I pack light, but this is what I believe I would need. I usually only eat the food, look at the map, and drink water thus far.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  4. #104
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    WOW.... I'm new to the sport but I must say... I'm shocked at how long some of these list are. It seems we spend hundreds (or thousands) of dollars to get light... only to get weighed down in "supplies". Maybe I'll be sorry but I plan on packing light and keeping my fingers crossed.

  5. #105
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    Get a backpack and after a few rides you wont even know its there...most of us keep water in it as well...It was a bit heavy at first but now I woudnt leave home without it ...
    Good luck with packing light...depends on how far your going to ride. the further you go the more supplies you need.
    Steve [SIZE="4"][/SIZE]

  6. #106
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    -knife (crkt ryan seven - really comfortable handle)
    -flashlight (coast 80 lumen-- i had a surefire which also mounted on my m4 carbine , but i lost it and didn't feel like spending another $100 bucks on a light. the coast is very well made, and Very bright; enough to use as a defensive light, and runs on AAA which are cheaper)
    ---i always carry these pretty much everywhere i go anyways, knife and light.


    -phone
    -money (i forget where i stole this idea, but i put a $10 bill in the bottom of my seat tube and corked the bottom.
    -photon light -clipped to bag
    -whistle/compass - clipped to bag
    -paracord bracelet - clipped to bag (depending on the bracelet, you can carry 8-10 ft)
    -bandana - wrapped around forearm or wrist
    -hideaway knife and another photon light - on neck -- these things are pretty awesome
    http://www.hideawayknife.com/main.php
    -lighter
    -phone
    -watch
    -contact case, and a little contact rewetting drop bottle
    -tube
    -cheap pump that has a piece broken off and held on w/ duct tape until i get a better one
    -patch kit
    -zip ties -- actually i'm out. i took em out my bike bag for something else. need to replce.
    -multitool - like leatherman
    -fold out allen key tool (has like 7 sizes & screwdriver)
    -WATER, 1 one bike, one in bag
    -xtra tshirt ) in shoulderbag
    -snacks - usually a melted snickers bar and bag of skittles stick of beef jerky. sometimes starbursts.



    ---- most of it clips onto my bag or waistband (knife,whistle,paracord, etc,, and the rest minus spare waterbottle, snacks and pump can fit into the wedge under my seat.
    --- and ALL thes put together dont really weigh much. most of the weight really are the 2 water bottles.

    ---------------------
    To get list

    -levers - have never had them, always just used my fingers, but would make thngs ezr.
    -wanna save up and get a nice camelbak, one w/ xtra pocket or room for stuff.

    ---gonna put together a couple altoid kits. thanks,i really like that idea.
    -could put patch kit and levers and zipties into one.
    -1st aid stuff and lighter into another
    -and contact case and rewet drops into another
    ----- then throw those in a zipsandwhich bag
    -space blanket
    -chain tool, or maybe a better bike tool that has it included
    -chain stuff like link/pin stuff


    cheers

  7. #107
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    Not sure if this has been mentioned but it is a must on longer rides.

    Baby Wipes. Work waay better than TP and they have multiple uses besides the obvious.

    Of course the one day I forgot them was the day I really NEEDED them. Basically I returned to trail head after the ride with no shirt.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    Not sure if this has been mentioned but it is a must on longer rides.

    Baby Wipes. Work waay better than TP and they have multiple uses besides the obvious.

    Of course the one day I forgot them was the day I really NEEDED them. Basically I returned to trail head after the ride with no shirt.
    yeah, i think it was mentioned earlier, but def a good idea... and anyways i totally forgot and seeing your post just reminded me, i also need to add some tp, and wipes to my bag.

    lotsa good info in this thread btw.

    cheers.

  9. #109
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    i think everybody (and i mean everybody) should have current first aid/cpr cards.

    "stumps don't lie."

  10. #110
    Platforms For Life
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    Good quality tweezers. Thorns and splinters!
    2008 GT Force 3.0
    2009 Bianchi Pista fixie

  11. #111
    the giant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigH
    At the Jasper gathering way back when I cracked the linkage plates on my old Sunn in the middle of a 20 mile loop.



    I was able to ride out from trail to the highway (~5 miles) and ride back to the trail head (~5 miles) by jaming a correctly sized stick between the seat statys and seat tube held in place by a couple of straps. I had to jam the front derailleur with a small wedge rock to keep it in gear as I had to remove the front derailleur cable.



    For a broken brake lever I think I would have removed the broken lever blade and looked around to see if I could find a stick that could be wittled (sp?) away to substitute to at least get some front braking.

    On the bike I've used for off road touring I installed Avid mechanical brakes specifically because if I brake a lever or damage a cable finding parts for a mechanical lever or v-brake at a small town bike shop should be a lot easier than finding specific parts for hydraulic disk brakes. (My 2 other main bikes have hydraulic brakes though.)
    dude. does that bike have hydraulic v-brakes? thats sick. never seen that before.

  12. #112
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    This may have already been mentioned, but I hike also and I always have in my daypack that kind of differ from previous list:
    lighter
    solar blanket
    weather shell/softshell depending on season
    knife
    magnesium fire starter
    granola bar/snack


    I know these aren't typical mountain biking items, but I like to have them just in case I was lost or the worst case scenario happens. Plus the stuff is pretty light too so it isn't a big deal. Hope this helps, especially if you are going deep in the woods.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselAndDust
    When I ride local trails (15 to 20 miles a loop) I carry water and the keys to my jeep and a whistle... that's it. Rarely do I ever have bike failure and in the last 10 years I've only had to push the bike out once.
    Crazy! I always have an extra set of tubes, tire tools and pump. Why would you ever be without those? All the technique/tune/experience in the world cannot account for all the things that can flatten a tire. Forget it. If it's farther than spitting distance from the house/car I'll always take tubes.

  14. #114
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    i also like to carry a chain saw and a sawed off double barrel shot gun. never know when you might run into a few zombies

  15. #115
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Where I ussually ride is still in the city but I usually carry:
    -Water
    -Some Cash
    -Debit Card
    -Mobile phone
    -iPod
    -Hoodie(usually wearing this)
    -More water

    I don't carry around tools really on most rides because like I said earlier, most of my riding is done on city trails. If I break something, I call up my mom or dad to pick me up. They both have dodge pick ups so yeah. Being a kid is awesome.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  16. #116
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    This has probably been mentioned but I always carry one or two quick connect chain links in case my chain breaks. I think they are made by SRAM.

    Sure you still have to go through the trouble of removing the damaged links but it saves a lot of time putting it back together and also prevents you from having to shorten your chain too much.

    Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    Last edited by KaizerSozay; 04-16-2009 at 04:38 PM.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfsburg916
    i also like to carry a chain saw and a sawed off double barrel shot gun. never know when you might run into a few zombies
    used to carry my custom .45 springfield 1911 in my bag for nite rides and bcuz there's a bunch of bums, usually drunk bums, but after learning the trail a bit better, have decided to leave it at home. carry my knives, uber light, and mace instead though. and for the occasional zombie, they're pretty slow, so catching them is pretty easy. we've always used piano wire to finish them off, saves a bullet too, and avoids the mess of chainsaws. they're really good eating if you're lucky enough to find one. pretty much all been hunted out in my area. i know the restaurant up the street has to order theirs in from canada. overpriced but delicious.

    cheers.

  18. #118
    SSolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    ...Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    Good idea, I used a piece of Duct Tape folded in half with the links in the middle. Keeps em in one place and large enough to find when you need em.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  19. #119
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    I don't know if anyone's mentioned it yet, but if you live in an area with a lot of poison oak a couple of packs of Technu wipes in your bag is a virtually weightless way to save you weeks of misery.
    Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come

  20. #120
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    My #1:

    Current Technician Class HAM Radio certification, and 5 watt 2-meter radio tuned into local repeaters. Overkill? Maybe. But 1/2 pound of weight for the ability to call in a medivac or 911 at 100 mile range in the backcountry isn't bad. Ever been to death valley? No cell phone coverage for 50 mile radius. There, like everywhere else, you can get to EMS on the local repeater without even sending 5 watts. I don't know of anywhere in America you can't call EMS with a 2m handheld. Ditch your cell on a ride and the weight is almost cancelled. $99, waterproof, shockproof, nearly invincible, and a damn good alternative to patching up your buddy's chest wound with duct tape and a space blanket. Did I mention you can get local police, EMS, taxi dispatch, national weather service, it's a fully functional scanner, and the stock 1400 Mah battery lasts literally for days?


    "Please send a helicopter, asap"

  21. #121
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    These are all great ideas, but really i think were forgetting the quick clot, and tourniquets. Cant leave home with out those

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    This has probably been mentioned but I always carry one or two quick connect chain links in case my chain breaks. I think they are made by SRAM.

    Sure you still have to go through the trouble of removing the damaged links but it saves a lot of time putting it back together and also prevents you from having to shorten your chain too much.

    Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    nice....

  23. #123
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Who here carry's around a parktool Mutli-tool? How are they? I just upgraded a bit more on my bike and most of the parts use allen bolts (5, 6, and 3 I think). And I need a multi tool instead of carry around separate allen wrenches.

    So what are the multi's from park like?
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by zadey1234
    Who here carry's around a parktool Mutli-tool? How are they? I just upgraded a bit more on my bike and most of the parts use allen bolts (5, 6, and 3 I think). And I need a multi tool instead of carry around separate allen wrenches.

    So what are the multi's from park like?
    Multi-tools are great to have in your bag and you'll find you use much more than the allen wrenches. I own both a Park and a Topeak multi-tool and both are good products. I prefer the the Topeak over the Park, however, because it's a bit more compact.
    Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come

  25. #125
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Down on a local trail the other day, I saw a dude on a massive downhill bike, with a pretty big bag with spare parts(derailleurs, gear and brake cables, chains) but also on his 3'x7' trailer he was hauling, he had an actual spare bike. I just had the dumbest look on my face when I saw it.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

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