1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #76
    OnTheTrailAgain
    Reputation: 2ndgen's Avatar
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    [SIZE="4"]Some pretty cool mini Altoid Tin Survival Kits...[/SIZE]

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Mini.../?comments=all

    Last edited by 2ndgen; 08-17-2008 at 09:41 AM.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by xnothingpoetic
    This is what I bring with most of the time.

    100oz of water in hydration pack (or less depending on amount of time planned to ride+temp)
    gloves
    glasses (clear or tinted lenses)
    spare tube
    mini-pump
    pressure gauge
    small 3"-4" folding knife
    tire levers (2)
    multi-tool
    patch kit
    map of trails
    peanuts
    and depending on forecast- a light windbreaker (water proof)
    and for extra hot days- a water bottle on the bike.
    That's two or three extra bottles of water around here in the summer.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  3. #78
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    It occurs to me that you could pack as much as will fit into a wide-neck water bottle if you need some way to keep it dry and securely attached. Jim.

  4. #79
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    Wow! This info is so great!
    Thanks to all!

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by youngjim
    It occurs to me that you could pack as much as will fit into a wide-neck water bottle if you need some way to keep it dry and securely attached. Jim.
    there are wide-mouthed nalgene bottle survival kits just like you described.

    plenty of room for tools and a tube in there too.
    keep it pushin'

  6. #81
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    I've been wanting to do some more remote riding, such as at Henry Coe, where you can't realistically carry enough water for the whole day. What is the water filter of choice for rides like this? I checked out REI today but nothing stood out as the right filter for MTB riding.

  7. #82
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    Great info all thanks so much..it really is a lot of help to a newb. I have not done any serious long distance trail rides yet but I think I will be ready now..


    Thanks again All!!!!!!!!

  8. #83
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    Things mounted to my bike 24/7:

    - Air pump
    - Bike lock
    - Front and rear lights

    Things I wear in a backpack:
    - Inner tube
    - Bike tool
    - 100 oz water in a Blackhawk Hydrastorm pack, with two additional pockets attached.
    - Cell phone, wallet
    - Sometimes I'll bring along a book to read
    - Flashlight
    - 100' of 550 cord

    Things I wear on me:
    - Knife
    - Sunglasses
    - Gloves
    - Old shoes I care nothing about

    Things that I bring if law permits it, and something no one else has said:
    - H&K USP with 16+1 rounds of 40 s&w
    - Light/Laser combination attached to pistol
    - 2 spare magazines

  9. #84
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    someone should sell a necessities pack for mountain biking.

  10. #85
    Alien Surf Team
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    Some non-bike things I bring
    - Camera
    - Binoculars
    - Knife or multi-tool
    - Sun Block
    - Light (I leave my little one on my bike all the time)
    - Extra battery for light
    - A little cash

  11. #86
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    Chris103 has a really comprehensive list, but I'd also add EXTRA WATER. AND LOTS OF IT. In the case of an accident where evacuation is necessary you will need enough water to stay hydrated long enough to get the crash victim out.
    [SIZE="4"]
    Mountain biking for beginners
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    A site dedicated to helping beginners

  12. #87
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    Going the Distance…The Tools and Gear to Bring With You on Your Next Long Distance Jo

    This is my checklist of everything in my daypack. I carry even more than this plus I have room to spare for extra food and water. I can get you some pics of how my pack is organized if you would like. I usually hike with bigger groups so I carry equipment for everyone. Hope that helps!

    Matt’s Hiking Checklist

    Before You Go
    Check Road Conditions/Restrictions
    Weather Reports
    Vehicle OK
    Info to a friend
    Familiar with the terrain and local area
    Cell Phone Fully Charged

    General
    Cell Phone
    Wallet
    Money
    Keys
    Boots
    Pants
    Extra Socks
    Sunscreen
    Bug Repellant
    Hat
    Water
    Food
    Toilet Paper
    Metal Pot or Cup
    GPS
    Camera
    Light System
    Spare Batteries
    Lighter
    Multitool
    Survival Knife
    Compass
    Map
    Light sticks
    Water Filtration Bottle
    Trash Bags
    Hand Warmer
    Eating Utensils
    Bear Bell
    UV Flashlight

    Survival Kit
    Signal Mirror
    Matches
    Lighter
    Tinder
    Flint Steel Firestarter
    Poncho
    Solar Blanket
    Fishing Line
    Fishing Hooks
    Compass
    Rope
    Candle
    Needle and Thread

    First Aid
    Minor Cuts (Antiseptic, Bandages)
    Major Cuts (Gauze, Medical Tape, Butterflies)
    Drugs (Tylenol, Aspirin, Benadryl
    , Tums, Pepto)
    Snake Bite Kit
    Moleskin
    Ammonia
    CPR Mask
    Bleeding Inhibitor
    Chap Stick
    Tweezers
    Alcohol Swabs
    Hand Sanitizer
    Inhaler
    Cough Drops
    Latex Gloves
    Cotton Balls
    Disposable Razor
    Toothpicks
    Lotion
    Duct Tape
    Scissors
    Hydrocortisone Ointment
    Flexall
    Saline Eye Wash
    SAM Splints
    Triangular Bandages

    Source: Going the Distance...The Tools and Gear to Bring With You on Your Next Long Distance Journey
    MTOBikes.com

    Keep the rubber side down!

  13. #88
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    Am i missing something here? why is almost everybody bringing a spare tube & a patch kit? especially if the idea is to bring only what you need? if anything, i think i would just bring 2 tubes, for the WORST of circumstances....

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by purit4your11
    Am i missing something here? why is almost everybody bringing a spare tube & a patch kit? especially if the idea is to bring only what you need? if anything, i think i would just bring 2 tubes, for the WORST of circumstances....
    You've never seen a tube explode into peices or getting several flats? Dry patch kit is size of postage stamp and weighs almost nothing....handly but won't patch any big holes.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  15. #90
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    If two tubes is all you need for the WORST of circumstances, you've never had three flats on a ride. Here's my kit, which has evolved over 14 years of riding. If there's anything in there that seems a little odd it's because I've needed it and didn't have it, or come close to spending an unplanned night in the woods.

    Aside from whatever clothes work with the day's weather, my minimalist short ride kit:

    In a seatbag I keep:
    1 tube
    Park glue-less patch kit (it's the size of a quarter)
    multitool with allens, chain breaker, etc.
    extra links (especially on the singlespeed)
    2 tire levers
    small leatherman (pliers, knife, file, etc.)

    In jersey pockets:
    1-3 hour of food depending on how long a ride and at least something with a wrapper for a tire boot
    mini-pump (I don't completely trust CO2 only)
    cellphone, wallet, key all in a sandwich bag

    For longer rides I get the camelback and add:
    more food/water
    1 more tube, 2 total
    1-2 extra chainring bolts (especially on the singlespeed)
    extra bite valve
    2 trashbags (impromptu rain jacket, or when filled with leaves a blanket)
    a lighter
    assorted zipties
    extra eyeglasses (I have really bad eyes)
    map of the area
    windbreaker
    more food, even a sandwich

    For all day and/or really remote rides I add:
    more food/water
    sometimes iodine tablets
    space blanket
    first aid kit

    Things I should add to the kit, especially for remote rides:
    mirror
    whistle

  16. #91
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    i keep superglue. the liquid stuff. it seals tubes for a while. but it only for small punctures.

  17. #92
    I build my own.
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    One more thing

    I had to add this. I read through the whole post and didn't see it. I know this is a beginner forum but now is a good time to start nagging. No, not nagging, educating.

    Pack a small GOOD QUALITY folding saw. It can be used as a survival tool (defense against dogs, bears and cougars and cutting firewood and shelter wood) but that's not why I want you to carry one.

    Sure, all you want to do is hike your bike over that downed tree and keep on going but take a minute and cut it out of the way. If you don't, who will? A 6 inch blade will cut through an 12 inch tree.

    There, I feel much better now.

  18. #93
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    i can see needing a saw in a survival situation,but please,please don't cut out kool trail features just cause you personally can't clean em (not directed at the above post,just generally speaking ).it's just down-rite rude/disrespectfull to those who enjoy ridin over it...only clear out downed trees if it's impassable (use good judgement please...one man's trash...).

    in my seat pack:
    1 tube (a 29er tube on the 29er,26er tube on the 26er...hey,some might not think... )
    1 patch kit
    1 multi tool (a pedros folding allen key set on the SS,alien II on the gearie 29er)
    a few links of chain (diffrent sized betweenst the SS and 29er)

    in my camelback:
    a good mini pump
    basic 1st aid kit
    6" adjustable wrench
    zip ties
    1" diameter of duct tape rolled around a broken-to-size pencil
    small "channelock" pliers
    cig lighter in ziplock baggie
    empty ziplock baggie (to pack out used of next)
    ziplock baggie full of wet/baby wipes
    100oz H2o
    snack (anything from pb&j,candy bar,poptart stix,etc)
    sturdy,sharp locking folder knife (enuff to help build a shelter,and defend myself)
    mini maglite/spare batts
    map if available/compass
    space blanket
    bandana
    spare bolts various sizes (most of the time,i forget these)

    i also wear a good sharp one hand opening 3-4" bladed folder on my waste band
    helmet
    gloves
    specs
    and a camera stashed somewhere
    '96 Specialized Hard Rock
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '13 On One Inbred
    '14 Surly Troll

  19. #94
    I build my own.
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    I should have clarified that. I meant trees blocking the trail. It happens a lot here.

    Almost all the trails I ride are trails I've built. They are carefully designed for flow and skill level so in some cases even a small tree on the ground has to be removed. I have 6 year old new riders on some of my trails.

    If I were riding someone else's trail and found a tree in my face, I'd be inclined to remove it.

  20. #95
    mtbr member
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    found this at rei- http://www.rei.com/product/745498

    looks decent if you want some basics in an all-in-one whistle, compass, etc.

  21. #96
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    "I've been wanting to do some more remote riding, such as at Henry Coe, where you can't realistically carry enough water for the whole day. What is the water filter of choice for rides like this? I checked out REI today but nothing stood out as the right filter for MTB riding."

    4 months late, but still. An important part.

    MSR makes a very awesome water filter. Weighs maybe a pound? Roughly the size of two soda cans. Can filter a few thousand gallons of water. Will kill everything except rare water virus... and those you can kill off with little iodine pills then filter it. Water tastes great, its small, light, and is cleanable. Its about 100$(kind of costly).

    First time I used it, I still brought enough water with me while backpacking.. but after my third backpacking trip with it, I was only carrying my camelbak.

    *PLEASE* be prudent enough to be double or triple sure there is still water somewhere for you to filter from. Its an awesome filter, but it can't turn sand into water.
    2008 Specialized Rockhopper -- STOLEN! *cry*
    09 Stout SE(Its like your sister, cheap and fun)

  22. #97
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris130
    That is a great idea.

    Here's my $0.02.

    Things to absolutely buy before riding:
    -- Good, quality helmet (non-negotiable)
    -- Some way to carry water (bottle or camelbak).

    Things that are definitely recommended before riding:
    -- Bike shorts
    -- A CamelBak-type product to carry both water and gear
    -- Spare tubes
    -- Tire levers (2)
    -- A quality mini-pump (don't skimp with a cheap one, trust me)
    -- Tube patch kit
    -- Good, quality minitool (Topeak Alien II, Crank Bros, or Park Tool offer nice ones)
    -- Gloves

    Other things that I've learned the hard way to keep in my hydro pack:
    -- Energy gel or some other form of anti-bonk
    -- Handi wipes and/or a little bottle of purell - makes cleaning hands easy for repairs or first aid
    -- Those small alcohol pads that you get with other stuff - good to clean tubes for patches and are nice for first aid
    -- Some form of basic ID w/ pertinent medical info
    -- Cell phone (reception capabilities permitting)
    -- Spare chain links, PowerLinks (2), & a good chain-breaker tool (if not on minitool)
    -- A spare rear derailleur hanger
    -- A comprehensive first aid kit (such as a hiker kit from REI, etc)
    -- Zip-ties in assorted sizes
    -- A coupla feet of duct tape (just fold it around itself for a nice compact package)
    -- Bug juice
    -- Shock pump (optional)
    -- Small but powerful flashlight (you never know!)
    -- Pliers - I keep a small, cheapie Leatherman knockoff in my pack. It works for the few occassions I need it.
    -- Spoke wrench (if not on minitool)
    -- Some cash
    -- Some form of a sharp blade.

    I'm sure others will have great ideas; I'm undoubtedly forgetting something...

    Cheers, Chris


    Great List Chris , Thanks a heap

  23. #98
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    Just wanted to give a big thanks to y'all. Many items on here I never would have thought of, and I kinda feel like an idiot lol.

    One question I did have that I did not see mentioned. Is there a quick fix for those with hydralic brakes? Perhaps a few feet of line and a small bottle of fluid? Or should I not even worry about it?
    "Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride"

    - John F. Kennedy

  24. #99
    GBD
    GBD is offline
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    VERY IMPORTANT MTB RIDERS!!!
    i was riding with a group with a leader
    guy on a MTB snapped the deralleur pulley cog straight out, came flying off, couldnt find it - it was from the stress of climbing a hill. lucky the leader had a spare. it was the top cog that feeds the chain onto the cassette.

    so make sure u take spare derailleur pulley cogs and cage just incase

  25. #100
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    I am a little under prepaired compaired to most but I carry:
    hydro pack
    TP
    2 gu gels
    multi-tool w/chainbreaker
    patch kit
    spare tube
    sunscreen
    zip ties
    pump
    ID
    tire levers


    A very important part of trail repair that has not been mentionend yet, is to learn how to use all of your emergency repair kit in the comfort of your own home. I can not count the number of people I have stopped to help that had a broke chain but did not know how to use their chain tool or did not know tht they had to switch the little rubber bushing in their pump to go between presta and shrader. All the tools in the world are useless if you don't know how to use them.

    Another important trail repair tip is to take your time. there are many small screws and whatnots that can be lost if you are in a hurry. And I'm sure almost all of us have stopped for a flat tire, swapped tubes, only to pinch flat a mile down the trail because we were in a hurry to continue the ride and did not put enough air in the tire.

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