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  1. #151
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    wow, you guys pack a bike bag like i pack a purse. i like it. hawt. a few things i've learned to carry from snowboarding and other life situations where a gas station isn't handy:

    Immodium AD (I like mine with Gas Relief) - this has quite literally saved my and many of my friends' butts. no one wants the runs on the trail.
    Ibuprofen/other painkillers - I never leave home without them, and I carry my migraine meds, too.
    Asthma inhaler - this is a no-brainer to you asthmatics.
    Agree 110% on the baby wipes. I get mini-packs at Target.
    Tampons - yes, even guys. I've bandaged a dude's finger with a tampon and a zip tie before. good for nosebleeds, too.
    Benadryl - if you have hayfever or other allergies, an antihistamine is a really good bet. makes things a lot more comfy.
    Contact wearers - spare lenses & maybe glasses. There were times when my eyes got irritated and I couldn't get contacts back in.
    Lip Balm! Something that won't melt.

    And I always have a spare wallet (just a little bifold card case) that has a secondary debit card (so it's not such a hassle if I lose it) and a state ID (so I still have my driver's license in my main wallet). I keep extra insurance cards in there, too. My phone is programmed with emergency contact numbers and current meds/drug allergies.

  2. #152
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    Anyone have the Problem of Crashing going UP HILL?!?!

    YES! you read it right I have a tendency to crash (loose my balance) when going up hill...I can go down hill, around the corners etc super fast and not crash and every now and then I will crash going up hill. I usually do shift down but something always throws my balance! UGH really frustrating....I always bang the same knee too and it makes me mad. My boyfriend on the other hand thinks its rather comical. And I have to admit I find it funny too...except when it hurts..LMAO!

    Any Advise?
    Happy Trails ~ Angi

  3. #153
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    I just wanted to thank everyone for all their advice, this will make my riding experience more enjoyable
    I feel like going for a ride. Who wants to join me.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Up-HillCrasher
    YES! you read it right I have a tendency to crash (loose my balance) when going up hill...I can go down hill, around the corners etc super fast and not crash and every now and then I will crash going up hill. I usually do shift down but something always throws my balance! UGH really frustrating....I always bang the same knee too and it makes me mad. My boyfriend on the other hand thinks its rather comical. And I have to admit I find it funny too...except when it hurts..LMAO!

    Any Advise?
    Yes, post your question under the appropriate thread or start your own if there isn't one already! That'll help you get a proper answer faster...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~


    I just added a spare set of CB cleats and screws for my shoes the other day! Was lookin at my cleats (after installing new pedals) and noticed that they are pretty worn. I like em worn cause the clip in and out easier, but if they ever fail to clip in it would suck....so now I carry spares.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  5. #155
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    Just what I was looking for... thanks for all the advice people

  6. #156
    I Break Things
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    Is there a best place online to get most of this stuff in one checkout?

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashby
    Is there a best place online to get most of this stuff in one checkout?
    www.amazon.com

  8. #158
    I Break Things
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    wow marquis fail more

  9. #159
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    Here's what I've got in my pack (Besides water).

    For extremely long rides, I carry a water filter and spare food.

    On short rides here in my local trails, I often have a small, folding brush saw to clear debris, branches etc (my contribution to doing trail work).
    Attached Files Attached Files

  10. #160
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    Looks well thought out!
    Tighten it 'til it strips - then back it off a quarter turn

    MTB Name = The Executioner

  11. #161
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    Most of my rides are never more than an hour or two walk out, I normally carry;


    Bottle of water (camelbak if on longer rides)
    Some sort of isotonic drink
    Sachet of instant drink.
    Chocolate bar of some sort.
    Multi-tool (includes chain tool, torx wrench, spoke wrench etc).
    Spare chain links.
    Tube
    Patches
    Cell phone
    Wallet/ID
    Accu-check meter + insulin

  12. #162
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    multi tool. pump. shock pump. gels/ banana, camera, a few zip ties, tube (in case tubeless fails), water, knee pads, sram links x 2

  13. #163
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    Not sure if it has been mentioned yet, but I carry a spare set of contacts, poncho and a lighter along with a lot of the other commonly carried items in my pack. A large trash bag could be carried in place of a poncho.

  14. #164
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    Get a big gym bag and throw all of your stuff in it. That way when you go off on a ride, all of your gear is in there. All you need to do is suit up, fill your hydration pack and bring some food.
    "Don't ride faster than your guardian angel can fly"

  15. #165
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    In the last 9 months riding ive only really needed a multi tool with allens keys and chain breaker a patch kit and presta to schrader adaptor. i just walk to the servo only about 1hr walk max where i ride. patch the tire, fill it and then go home.

  16. #166
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    Sorry to bring this thread back, but I just read through it for the first time. I noticed a lot of people mention whistles, but if you are in an area where oak trees are common, you might be able to use an acorn cap instead.
    http://www.sciencetoymaker.org/acorn/assembl.html

    This is a great skill to learn in case you ever get stuck out anywhere without a whistle as long as there are oak trees around (you won't have much luck in northern California). It's fun to find the smallest acorn caps possible because they make a higher more obnoxious sound.
    Matt

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris130
    That is a great idea.

    Here's my $0.02.

    Things to absolutely buy before riding:
    -- Good, quality helmet (non-negotiable)
    -- Some way to carry water (bottle or camelbak).

    Things that are definitely recommended before riding:
    -- Bike shorts
    -- A CamelBak-type product to carry both water and gear
    -- Spare tubes
    -- Tire levers (2)
    -- A quality mini-pump (don't skimp with a cheap one, trust me)
    -- Tube patch kit
    -- Good, quality minitool (Topeak Alien II, Crank Bros, or Park Tool offer nice ones)
    -- Gloves

    Other things that I've learned the hard way to keep in my hydro pack:
    -- Energy gel or some other form of anti-bonk
    -- Handi wipes and/or a little bottle of purell - makes cleaning hands easy for repairs or first aid
    -- Those small alcohol pads that you get with other stuff - good to clean tubes for patches and are nice for first aid
    -- Some form of basic ID w/ pertinent medical info
    -- Cell phone (reception capabilities permitting)
    -- Spare chain links, PowerLinks (2), & a good chain-breaker tool (if not on minitool)
    -- A spare rear derailleur hanger
    -- A comprehensive first aid kit (such as a hiker kit from REI, etc)
    -- Zip-ties in assorted sizes
    -- A coupla feet of duct tape (just fold it around itself for a nice compact package)
    -- Bug juice
    -- Shock pump (optional)
    -- Small but powerful flashlight (you never know!)
    -- Pliers - I keep a small, cheapie Leatherman knockoff in my pack. It works for the few occassions I need it.
    -- Spoke wrench (if not on minitool)
    -- Some cash
    -- Some form of a sharp blade.

    I'm sure others will have great ideas; I'm undoubtedly forgetting something...

    Cheers, Chris
    I agree that alot of this should be handy in the event of emergency...but how much added weight does all this create on your back...just curious if this causes any additional back ache's or maybe even potentially cause an accident due to shifting or too much weight

    thanks
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  18. #168
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    I commute to class on a bike, and my backpack causes no problems. Yesterday I had it stuffed full with my laptop, 4 books, 2 notebooks, and a lead-acid battery, probably 30lbs total, and although it would have caused some back ache after a while, it didn't interfere with my ability to ride the bike (except making it harder to go up hills). On the trail, I've carried someone else's backpack with a SLR camera, 1L of water, and plenty of other stuff. Again, it didn't get in the way at all. I don't normally use a camelback or any sort of backpack if I'm trail riding, though, because they make my back sweaty. But the stuff we are talking about carrying weighs very little, and the water in a camelback is quite a bit heavier in comparison.
    Matt

  19. #169
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    i don't know why people talk about back problems. I ride with a Camelback H.A.W.G. Full!! full first aid kit and misc bike extra's. derailleurs, tubes, chains, Q/R's and so on. Also a full 100oz camelback. I've ridden 3 to 5 hour VTT's (bike race) and never had a problem. I'm not a light guy and i'm not a weight wennie. Lighter bike cause more problems. I ride a light bike with quality parts and heavier parts in high wear areas. If you have back problems it more you then what your carrying.

  20. #170
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    Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    These is my list when i'm going out with my bike in 24 hours....
    I hope these list can help to those new bikers.
    Thanks and enjoy rides.

    GEAR:

    Helmet
    Limited visibility Glasses
    Dark Glasses
    Full gloves
    3/4 gloves
    Saddlebag tool kit
    Pump
    Tubes
    Lip balm
    Water pack (Camel back)
    Sun screen
    Water bottles (1 quart min)
    Light weight fleece
    Bike socks (3pr)
    Outer jacket-rain/wind
    Bike shorts (2pr)
    Thermal bottom (bike tights)
    Thermal top
    Wool/ fleece hat
    Bike helmet light
    Bike light

    FOOD:

    Energy gels
    Re-hydrating mix

    COOKING:

    Biodegradable soap
    Stove Fuel
    Fuel bottle
    Garbage bags
    Measuring cup
    Spatula
    Can opener
    Insulated mugs
    Plates and cups
    Lighter and/or matches
    Ice chest
    Cooking pot set
    Small scrubber
    Stove
    Utensils and big spoon
    Zip lock bags
    Albumin foil

    CAMP:

    Camp pillow
    Ground tarp for tent
    Folding chairs
    Lantern
    Sleeping bag +20 degrees
    Sleeping pad
    Tent 3 season
    Towels

    TOILETRIES:

    Comb
    Toilet paper
    Tooth brush
    Tooth paste
    ___________
    buyertap

  21. #171
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    A Canadian in the Desert! Yike-A-Doodle!

    Love the thread. I wandered out into the deserts for 5 months, hiking, biking and driving down back roads that make the gravel roads in Canada look like freeways. I should have prepared a little more, but what did I know?

    Snakes. Tarantulas. Mountian Lions. In Canada, you're lucky to see a skunk!

    What struck me first, was all the &^%$ing flats you get! I tell people, 'watch those the background scenerie in shows from the southwest and all you see are gas stations that advertise flats fixed. Now I know why... Up in Canada, I got 3 or 4 flats in my whole life. Down in the Chihuahaun Desert, I probably had 2-3 a week. I got so fed up patching tires, until I found the heavy duty tubes! Not to mention filling your tires with that green puncture stuff that they use in cars. And do that to the vehicle too.

    I bought a really nice 12 v air pump, too.

    Picture this: Big Bend State Park Texas. July. Nobody's there. You are 5 miles from the deserted ranger station. Another 20 from the highway on a scrap gravel "road" and another 35 fro the nearest "town". You're awakened by a Long Horn, baying like crazy as it walks through your camp. You get up and make coffee, sit down to read a good book and notice, Oh! My truck tire is going flat! (The truck you had to buy in Del Rio, because the Chevy died on you?) The new truck that has the 1 lug nut that you need the special wrench so they don't take your rims. (It's an American thing! Not so big a problem in Canada that we need those!) Guess who never thought to check this? How could you? No problem. We'll bicycle into the ranger station and call for help. Except this is the first leg of my trip and the flat thing is just happening and as I look to my bike, the tires are both flat!!
    I was looking at a 60 mile walk on the roads in 100F heat. Or 20 miles over the mountains to the paved road.
    This Canuck, for a little while, thought he was a dead. (Luckily the ranger station was open and somebody was there and they had plenty of flat fixing/repair facilities!

    Point? You never can tell what's going to happen and maybe you do want to have a secondary back on things.

    Don't lose your head if **** happens. I looked at the truck and tire and said to myself, "Well Self! It's a good book and the coffee's hot, why don't we just read for a bit!"

    Great mention of the bell on the bike. Road and hiked with a red towel hung of the shoulder of my pack to fling out in case a mountain lion decided try me for a snack. Eerie feeling for a Canuck to watching the ravine tops for big cats.

    Nobody's mentioned a good flare system/signaling device. Blue tarp is the recommendation for air/visual that the rangers suggested. Also good for shelter. 10X10 is cheap and light.

    Magnesium sparker for fires? Fire starting fluid or material?

    By the end of the 1st month, I carried a 25lb pack EVERYWHERE I went down there. Water, food, gps, et cetera. Even for a 3 hour quickie hike. I tried to make sure I could survive quit comfortably for at least one night if things went wrong. And down there, a 3 hour walk will get you to places that one slip and you're dead. There is NO water down there. Up in Canada, you can't get away from the stuff. And it's clean, fresh water, not puddles of run-off filled with who-knows-what.

    I'm a lolly-gagger when it comes to riding trails. Any big hills I had to go down, I walked down. I actually had a milk crate on the back of my bike to carry crap. Use a solid bike rack that mounts securely and 6 hose clamps to secure it. It'll rattle lose so check it.

    Best practise? Dry run the scenerio. It's always a gamble. (Life ain't fair in case you didn't know...) but you can quickly stroke off a few things that will make a little problem stay little, or a big one, not so big.

    SweetDoug

  22. #172
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    Skip the magnesium fire starter and just carry waterproof matches. They are more reliable at starting fires in dry stuff you can find around in my experience. Maybe I just need to practice with the fire starter, but I haven't been able to light anything but cotton balls with it, and if you have to carry cotton balls, you might as well just carry matches instead.
    Matt

  23. #173
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    Mag starter

    And you are so right. It's very cool to see the survivor guy start fies with them and all that survivor stuff, but I never go out anywhere without a Bic light. 10 billion lights, Never breaks.Take two, their light!

    It's not like I'm going into the jungle on a special ops mission.

    (I take a queen sized mattress with me when I went south! So you can tell what a pansy I am!)

    SweetDoug

  24. #174
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    I tend to carry everything else for bike maintance that you all have mentioned so I am not going to mention it again. However, I do carry stuff more survival related. I found myself in a survival sitituation one time being stranded in a bad storm after getting lost after a hunting trip. After that, I dont take any trip without taking:

    Compass
    Cell phone
    First Aid kit
    4" knife
    Headlamp
    flashlight
    Small Survival handbook
    Map of the area if available
    Waterproof matches
    Coffee filters for filtering water

    I know that seems like a lot of weight but you can get a lot of this stuff pretty light from hiking sites and stores. Personally, after my expierence, its worth the extra weight.

  25. #175
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    my list

    For a 3 to 7 hour ride:
    Mini bike tool asst.
    baggie w/advil, alieve, excedrin (has caffiene) bandaids, gauze, cash, tp .
    Tire patch kit w/2 tire levers, sometimes an inner tube. small, good pump.
    Extra shirt. Coastal N. Ca fog means temp gradients equals spare shirt, light riding jacket, wool cap, neck warmer.
    2 to 5 power bars depending on duration.
    2 to 4 bottle w/ fierce grape gatorade depending on weather/duration of ride
    Sunglasses with changeable lenses (for sun to fog)
    Use to do camelback but I found getting the fluids in bottle cages low on bike put carried weight lower which makes better handling riding and is better for my back. I carry a light back pack with the other stuff and a spare water bottle if I have to.
    When I am taking a 1 to 2 hour power ride (I do lots of climbing) I often take just one water or nothing. I feel a huge difference when not carrying all the weight-I think even a couple pounds makes a difference. It is really fun to take a ride like this a couple times a week. I feel like i'm flying!
    Yes I've flatted out a couple times and had a long walk-but I enjoy hiking too!
    I use to carry the chain stuff-but since I've never had a chain break on me in the past 2 years I stopped. I just replace my chain every few months-or 1000 miles or so.
    Live to ride-ride to live

  26. #176
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    forgot 2 more things i pack

    Also a cell phone and bic lighter

  27. #177
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    I get this question a lot from students, here is a list I posted a couple weeks ago. http://betterride.net/blog/2011/10-i...ong-mtb-rides/
    Skills coaching loved by passionate riders of all levels and trusted by the pros.
    www.betterride.net

  28. #178
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    All good stuff. Something I didn't see yet: A half dozen water treatment tabs and a small whistle can save your life and weigh grams. Add these to your first aid kit. Also: I never set foot in the woods without toilet paper somewhere in my stuff. If you're traveling to ride chances are good you'll need it frequently.

  29. #179
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    BEEF JERKY is all you need ha

  30. #180
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    I carry a ton of stuff in my hawg, most of wich has already been mentioned, and I have used all of it at one time or another. The one thing I haven't seen is a six inch piece of wire bent on both ends to hold my chain while I am working on it. Great thread, Ive added a few things to my pack.

  31. #181
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    personally, just you, your bike, and some friends. Maybe a backpack with beer or something for the long trip.

    But seriously though, I think some people get too caught up in making sure their pack is full and ready for everything. Packing too much I think gets to be a pain, because most of the time you really don't need much of the stuff. maybe a tire and a pump, but do we really need med kits lol

  32. #182
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    I tend to be a minamilist. Just small towel, some snacks, a pocket knife (never know when a gators gonna try to get ya). and my cell phone I have tubes and pump at the car.

    Probably should carry more but there are enough people out there on the trails that if I really need anything else, I am sure there will be somebody that has what I need.

    Now if I went to some more remote areas, I would certainly cary a whole lot more to be safe
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  33. #183
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    Great site for packing light, if that's your fancy. Lot of good information in this thread from some veteran light packers.

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...thread_id=2981

  34. #184
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    i always carry some jack links beef jerkey, just incase i ever run into a sasquatch

  35. #185
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    great list. now i can start to put my roadbag together.

  36. #186
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    Gret stuff in this thread. In case I have to mess with anything greasy I keep a couple pairs of latex gloves in my seat bag or camelback...

  37. #187
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    wow, after viewing this thread I feel so unprepared :P

    I usually only bring my cellphone and keys

  38. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris130 View Post
    That is a great idea.

    Here's my $0.02.

    Things to absolutely buy before riding:
    -- Good, quality helmet (non-negotiable)
    -- Some way to carry water (bottle or camelbak).

    Things that are definitely recommended before riding:
    -- Bike shorts
    -- A CamelBak-type product to carry both water and gear
    -- Spare tubes
    -- Tire levers (2)
    -- A quality mini-pump (don't skimp with a cheap one, trust me)
    -- Tube patch kit
    -- Good, quality minitool (Topeak Alien II, Crank Bros, or Park Tool offer nice ones)
    -- Gloves

    Other things that I've learned the hard way to keep in my hydro pack:
    -- Energy gel or some other form of anti-bonk
    -- Handi wipes and/or a little bottle of purell - makes cleaning hands easy for repairs or first aid
    -- Those small alcohol pads that you get with other stuff - good to clean tubes for patches and are nice for first aid
    -- Some form of basic ID w/ pertinent medical info
    -- Cell phone (reception capabilities permitting)
    -- Spare chain links, PowerLinks (2), & a good chain-breaker tool (if not on minitool)
    -- A spare rear derailleur hanger
    -- A comprehensive first aid kit (such as a hiker kit from REI, etc)
    -- Zip-ties in assorted sizes
    -- A coupla feet of duct tape (just fold it around itself for a nice compact package)
    -- Bug juice
    -- Shock pump (optional)
    -- Small but powerful flashlight (you never know!)
    -- Pliers - I keep a small, cheapie Leatherman knockoff in my pack. It works for the few occassions I need it.
    -- Spoke wrench (if not on minitool)
    -- Some cash
    -- Some form of a sharp blade.

    I'm sure others will have great ideas; I'm undoubtedly forgetting something...

    Cheers, Chris
    Awesome. Thank you!

  39. #189
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    As someone who is looking to get back into biking, I've found the information in here very helpful.

  40. #190
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    Some great info here, thanks all for contributing.

  41. #191
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    good stuff!

  42. #192
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    All great advice. I would add the following tidbits, from more of a survival perspective:

    If there is a potential of getting lost (taking the wrong trail or ???), have some basic survival items, like a good knife and a means to start a fire. These items should be carried on your person, not in a pack or on your bike - you can be separated from a pack or bike, and/or you may lose it on the trail.

    ---and---

    Always tell someone where you are going and when you should be back - and have them check up on you...

  43. #193
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    Necessary: Helmet, Camelbak
    Exceptionally good idea: Mini-pump
    2 patch kits
    1 Extra tube
    2 Tire Levers
    1 Mini-Pump
    1 Mini-tool with as much stuff on it as possible
    1 First Aid Kit
    1 Length of twine
    Bazillion zip ties
    1 Knife
    Chain links
    Might as well:
    Powerbar(s)
    Cell Phone
    Bike Shorts
    Gloves
    Cleaning Wipes

  44. #194
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    feel like i'd need a suitcase when riding after reading Chris's initial posting

  45. #195
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    new here. just wanted to say thanks for the thread.

  46. #196
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    I don't know if it has been mentioned, because reading this tread all the way through here is a pain in the ass, but I always pack a folding 3" 7/8 outdoor knife or either a telescopic baton...

    You never know who or want you can encounter on the trails and either way, you got to get back at the end of the day. *togetyourbeerandtrollonmtbr.com*

    David


    Sent from my iPhone while bikin'
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  47. #197
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    thanks for the great info. I carry water of course, a pack with: levers, c02 air cartridge, spare tube, and a multitool. I also stuff my wallet and cell phone in there because you never know.

  48. #198
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    Alot of great ideas here!

  49. #199
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    Thanks for all this advice and ideas. I think i got a decent amount of things in my pack.

  50. #200
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    Love the advice. Will use it. Thanks

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