Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 13 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 150 of 674
  1. #101
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,531
    Quote Originally Posted by Specialized Kid
    One question I did have that I did not see mentioned. Is there a quick fix for those with hydralic brakes? Perhaps a few feet of line and a small bottle of fluid? Or should I not even worry about it?

    Good question....anybody?
    Get off the couch and ride!

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    42
    Oh, and on your way to work, don't forget the spare car..

  3. #103
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,800
    From my experience most of these lists are way too extensive for most of my rides. I do usually 1-3 hour rides. For those I carry my multi tool that has all the allen wrenches, aka hex keys, for my bike, it includes a chain tool, tire levers and other things I've never used. I also carry a spare tube or two depending on the ride, my co2 pump, and co2 cartridges. Sometimes if I'm doing a hammer fest with the fellas I'll take a gu or two. I always take water as well.

    My going into the middle of no where list is a little more extensive. I take all of the above in a hydro pack, map, more water of course, apple, cliff bar, peanuts possibly, first aid kit, and sometimes my cell phone. Oh and I usually carry some cash. I pack light, but this is what I believe I would need. I usually only eat the food, look at the map, and drink water thus far.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation: birdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    72
    WOW.... I'm new to the sport but I must say... I'm shocked at how long some of these list are. It seems we spend hundreds (or thousands) of dollars to get light... only to get weighed down in "supplies". Maybe I'll be sorry but I plan on packing light and keeping my fingers crossed.

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Holdsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    42
    Get a backpack and after a few rides you wont even know its there...most of us keep water in it as well...It was a bit heavy at first but now I woudnt leave home without it ...
    Good luck with packing light...depends on how far your going to ride. the further you go the more supplies you need.
    Steve

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    62
    -knife (crkt ryan seven - really comfortable handle)
    -flashlight (coast 80 lumen-- i had a surefire which also mounted on my m4 carbine , but i lost it and didn't feel like spending another $100 bucks on a light. the coast is very well made, and Very bright; enough to use as a defensive light, and runs on AAA which are cheaper)
    ---i always carry these pretty much everywhere i go anyways, knife and light.


    -phone
    -money (i forget where i stole this idea, but i put a $10 bill in the bottom of my seat tube and corked the bottom.
    -photon light -clipped to bag
    -whistle/compass - clipped to bag
    -paracord bracelet - clipped to bag (depending on the bracelet, you can carry 8-10 ft)
    -bandana - wrapped around forearm or wrist
    -hideaway knife and another photon light - on neck -- these things are pretty awesome
    http://www.hideawayknife.com/main.php
    -lighter
    -phone
    -watch
    -contact case, and a little contact rewetting drop bottle
    -tube
    -cheap pump that has a piece broken off and held on w/ duct tape until i get a better one
    -patch kit
    -zip ties -- actually i'm out. i took em out my bike bag for something else. need to replce.
    -multitool - like leatherman
    -fold out allen key tool (has like 7 sizes & screwdriver)
    -WATER, 1 one bike, one in bag
    -xtra tshirt ) in shoulderbag
    -snacks - usually a melted snickers bar and bag of skittles stick of beef jerky. sometimes starbursts.



    ---- most of it clips onto my bag or waistband (knife,whistle,paracord, etc,, and the rest minus spare waterbottle, snacks and pump can fit into the wedge under my seat.
    --- and ALL thes put together dont really weigh much. most of the weight really are the 2 water bottles.

    ---------------------
    To get list

    -levers - have never had them, always just used my fingers, but would make thngs ezr.
    -wanna save up and get a nice camelbak, one w/ xtra pocket or room for stuff.

    ---gonna put together a couple altoid kits. thanks,i really like that idea.
    -could put patch kit and levers and zipties into one.
    -1st aid stuff and lighter into another
    -and contact case and rewet drops into another
    ----- then throw those in a zipsandwhich bag
    -space blanket
    -chain tool, or maybe a better bike tool that has it included
    -chain stuff like link/pin stuff


    cheers

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    126
    Not sure if this has been mentioned but it is a must on longer rides.

    Baby Wipes. Work waay better than TP and they have multiple uses besides the obvious.

    Of course the one day I forgot them was the day I really NEEDED them. Basically I returned to trail head after the ride with no shirt.

  8. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    Not sure if this has been mentioned but it is a must on longer rides.

    Baby Wipes. Work waay better than TP and they have multiple uses besides the obvious.

    Of course the one day I forgot them was the day I really NEEDED them. Basically I returned to trail head after the ride with no shirt.
    yeah, i think it was mentioned earlier, but def a good idea... and anyways i totally forgot and seeing your post just reminded me, i also need to add some tp, and wipes to my bag.

    lotsa good info in this thread btw.

    cheers.

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation: yourideit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    275
    i think everybody (and i mean everybody) should have current first aid/cpr cards.

    "stumps don't lie."

  10. #110
    Platforms For Life
    Reputation: Halfrican's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    203
    Good quality tweezers. Thorns and splinters!
    2008 GT Force 3.0
    2009 Bianchi Pista fixie

  11. #111
    the giant.
    Reputation: gbosbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by CraigH
    At the Jasper gathering way back when I cracked the linkage plates on my old Sunn in the middle of a 20 mile loop.



    I was able to ride out from trail to the highway (~5 miles) and ride back to the trail head (~5 miles) by jaming a correctly sized stick between the seat statys and seat tube held in place by a couple of straps. I had to jam the front derailleur with a small wedge rock to keep it in gear as I had to remove the front derailleur cable.



    For a broken brake lever I think I would have removed the broken lever blade and looked around to see if I could find a stick that could be wittled (sp?) away to substitute to at least get some front braking.

    On the bike I've used for off road touring I installed Avid mechanical brakes specifically because if I brake a lever or damage a cable finding parts for a mechanical lever or v-brake at a small town bike shop should be a lot easier than finding specific parts for hydraulic disk brakes. (My 2 other main bikes have hydraulic brakes though.)
    dude. does that bike have hydraulic v-brakes? thats sick. never seen that before.

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    43
    This may have already been mentioned, but I hike also and I always have in my daypack that kind of differ from previous list:
    lighter
    solar blanket
    weather shell/softshell depending on season
    knife
    magnesium fire starter
    granola bar/snack


    I know these aren't typical mountain biking items, but I like to have them just in case I was lost or the worst case scenario happens. Plus the stuff is pretty light too so it isn't a big deal. Hope this helps, especially if you are going deep in the woods.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MATPHAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by DieselAndDust
    When I ride local trails (15 to 20 miles a loop) I carry water and the keys to my jeep and a whistle... that's it. Rarely do I ever have bike failure and in the last 10 years I've only had to push the bike out once.
    Crazy! I always have an extra set of tubes, tire tools and pump. Why would you ever be without those? All the technique/tune/experience in the world cannot account for all the things that can flatten a tire. Forget it. If it's farther than spitting distance from the house/car I'll always take tubes.

  14. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1
    i also like to carry a chain saw and a sawed off double barrel shot gun. never know when you might run into a few zombies

  15. #115
    Zach Kowalchuk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    427
    Where I ussually ride is still in the city but I usually carry:
    -Water
    -Some Cash
    -Debit Card
    -Mobile phone
    -iPod
    -Hoodie(usually wearing this)
    -More water

    I don't carry around tools really on most rides because like I said earlier, most of my riding is done on city trails. If I break something, I call up my mom or dad to pick me up. They both have dodge pick ups so yeah. Being a kid is awesome.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  16. #116
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    126
    This has probably been mentioned but I always carry one or two quick connect chain links in case my chain breaks. I think they are made by SRAM.

    Sure you still have to go through the trouble of removing the damaged links but it saves a lot of time putting it back together and also prevents you from having to shorten your chain too much.

    Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    Last edited by KaizerSozay; 04-16-2009 at 03:38 PM.

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfsburg916
    i also like to carry a chain saw and a sawed off double barrel shot gun. never know when you might run into a few zombies
    used to carry my custom .45 springfield 1911 in my bag for nite rides and bcuz there's a bunch of bums, usually drunk bums, but after learning the trail a bit better, have decided to leave it at home. carry my knives, uber light, and mace instead though. and for the occasional zombie, they're pretty slow, so catching them is pretty easy. we've always used piano wire to finish them off, saves a bullet too, and avoids the mess of chainsaws. they're really good eating if you're lucky enough to find one. pretty much all been hunted out in my area. i know the restaurant up the street has to order theirs in from canada. overpriced but delicious.

    cheers.

  18. #118
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,531
    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    ...Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    Good idea, I used a piece of Duct Tape folded in half with the links in the middle. Keeps em in one place and large enough to find when you need em.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mike E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    489
    I don't know if anyone's mentioned it yet, but if you live in an area with a lot of poison oak a couple of packs of Technu wipes in your bag is a virtually weightless way to save you weeks of misery.
    Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rollmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    161
    My #1:

    Current Technician Class HAM Radio certification, and 5 watt 2-meter radio tuned into local repeaters. Overkill? Maybe. But 1/2 pound of weight for the ability to call in a medivac or 911 at 100 mile range in the backcountry isn't bad. Ever been to death valley? No cell phone coverage for 50 mile radius. There, like everywhere else, you can get to EMS on the local repeater without even sending 5 watts. I don't know of anywhere in America you can't call EMS with a 2m handheld. Ditch your cell on a ride and the weight is almost cancelled. $99, waterproof, shockproof, nearly invincible, and a damn good alternative to patching up your buddy's chest wound with duct tape and a space blanket. Did I mention you can get local police, EMS, taxi dispatch, national weather service, it's a fully functional scanner, and the stock 1400 Mah battery lasts literally for days?


    "Please send a helicopter, asap"

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    30
    These are all great ideas, but really i think were forgetting the quick clot, and tourniquets. Cant leave home with out those

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: British Bulldog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by KaizerSozay
    This has probably been mentioned but I always carry one or two quick connect chain links in case my chain breaks. I think they are made by SRAM.

    Sure you still have to go through the trouble of removing the damaged links but it saves a lot of time putting it back together and also prevents you from having to shorten your chain too much.

    Unfortunately, these little suckers are pretty small and get lost in a CamelBack easily. I took a ring of a keychain and placed it on my multi tool that includes a chain breaker tool. I then placed the pieces of the quick link on the key ring. Now when I grab my multi tool that has the chain tool on it my quick link pieces are right there and easy to find.
    nice....

  23. #123
    Zach Kowalchuk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    427
    Who here carry's around a parktool Mutli-tool? How are they? I just upgraded a bit more on my bike and most of the parts use allen bolts (5, 6, and 3 I think). And I need a multi tool instead of carry around separate allen wrenches.

    So what are the multi's from park like?
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mike E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    489
    Quote Originally Posted by zadey1234
    Who here carry's around a parktool Mutli-tool? How are they? I just upgraded a bit more on my bike and most of the parts use allen bolts (5, 6, and 3 I think). And I need a multi tool instead of carry around separate allen wrenches.

    So what are the multi's from park like?
    Multi-tools are great to have in your bag and you'll find you use much more than the allen wrenches. I own both a Park and a Topeak multi-tool and both are good products. I prefer the the Topeak over the Park, however, because it's a bit more compact.
    Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come

  25. #125
    Zach Kowalchuk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    427
    Down on a local trail the other day, I saw a dude on a massive downhill bike, with a pretty big bag with spare parts(derailleurs, gear and brake cables, chains) but also on his 3'x7' trailer he was hauling, he had an actual spare bike. I just had the dumbest look on my face when I saw it.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  26. #126
    wannabe
    Reputation: butchseaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    that way no matter what breaks, Craig has at least 1/2 bike in spare parts from which to beg a replacement.

    j/k, but I couldn't resist. Even when I do have the tools (like last Friday) Craig whips his repair tools out faster than the proverbial speeding bullet.

    Jim
    Sounds like Craig is the guy to have along... Good job Craig

  27. #127
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    14
    Wow, this is quite a bit of stuff to bring along... Ive never been on a full day ride, though, and especially not in the middle of nowhere / mountains / hills, so I appreciate this thread for the info, big time.

    I'll add..

    I try to bring my small digi cam + extra batteries

    somethin to smoke... hehehe....... 'nough said. oh, a lighter, too.

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by mtobikes
    T
    Mattís Hiking Checklist


    SAM Splints
    i have been reading this topic top to bottom and making my own list as i go. i picked up my bike from the shop yesterday and have not ridden it yet. i will be doing so verry soon though as the roads near my house are a good blend of flat and hilly and there is an area of foothills and trails about half a mile from the house.

    matt's list is pretty good but when i got to the second to last item i had to lauugh. he is the only person to mention sam splints and i had it on my list before i started pulling from here.

    i just want to contribute a little to this mandatory reading.

    a SAM splint is a rectangular piece of flexible aluminum with foam padding on one side. you roll it op tight an d small. it takes little space and weighs even less. now when you have a broken bone, the samsplint is unrolled and then, padded side to the injured limb, the long wise edges are curled up to cradled said injured limb. make it kind of tight as this is now a temporary cast and i good one at that. they make them in a few sizes from finger size to large enough to splint you femur. i recommend a finger splint and an arm splint. if you need to splint a femur just break some medium stick unless you are in the desert.

    this may have been touche don already, i have not finished page one yet.

  29. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja
    I had to add this. I read through the whole post and didn't see it. I know this is a beginner forum but now is a good time to start nagging. No, not nagging, educating.

    Pack a small GOOD QUALITY folding saw. It can be used as a survival tool (defense against dogs, bears and cougars and cutting firewood and shelter wood) but that's not why I want you to carry one.

    Sure, all you want to do is hike your bike over that downed tree and keep on going but take a minute and cut it out of the way. If you don't, who will? A 6 inch blade will cut through an 12 inch tree.

    There, I feel much better now.
    if you come across a cougar, bear wolf etc, and you have time to get out and unfold your saw, you won't need it cuz you is bad. but they will pwn you with that. if you want something to take on a tree and a bear with anything close to half a chance, i would recommend http://www.rmjforge.com/eagle_talon.htm.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOZ5gLSefhY
    i know, call me rambo. no, i do not carry this. i don't own one yet but it is on my list as i hike with my young children and there are mtn lions in the area. it has an under shoulder scabbard that is suited for anything as the tomahawk was specifically designed for specopps soldiers on request. the price tage is over 300 bones, but my bike was 2100 sticker price, and it is the first real bike i have ever owned. so i do not think that is a lot of money for what it is and what went into making it. not sure if i will ever ride with it though. maybe.

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,904
    I figured I'd toss in info on what I carry in my Camelback on every ride:

    water, 70-100 oz, of course
    2 tubes - cause that day's gonna come where you flat twice
    metal tire levers - plastic ones break, then you're screwed
    Crank Bros mini pump
    Park Tool glueless patch kit - tiny little patch kit that will save your butt when you pinch flat that last tube.
    2 different sizespoke wrenches
    folding allen keys
    bunch of zip ties
    chain tool
    SRAM power link
    small pliers
    small folding knife
    energy gel, Cliff bar, something to munch on mid ride
    little headlamp just in case
    extra layer if it chilly
    cell phone
    wallet with ID
    Gorilla tape - great for everything
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2015 Trek Farley 26fat
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er

  31. #131
    Platforms For Life
    Reputation: Halfrican's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    203
    I would like to add that a tick removal tool helps a ton. But some good pointed tweezers serve other purposes and will also work for removing ticks.

    2008 GT Force 3.0
    2009 Bianchi Pista fixie

  32. #132
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1
    Im new to mountain biking, but not to planning for the wilderness. Garbage bags are a huge priority for me, because they can do so many things, but I like to bring orange instead of black, because they can help you be seen.Also, I use orange or reflective duct tape, to add another possible use for it.

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FELT520's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12
    Great Ideas thanks for posting!

  34. #134
    JDH
    JDH is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    16

    Good job! WOW a lot of extra weight.

    A few people have talked about riding in isolated areas, well I ride in Alaska and you can't get more isolated than this. Some of the trails I've ridden up here can take 7 to 8 hours to walk out of and I've found there is 1 thing that you should never ride without!

    A good full bike pre-ride inspection!
    (Go to your local bike shop, ask the mechanic what he looks at on his own bike before a ride, long and short) Half the parts listed above can be avoided if you learn the mechanics of your bike and what to look for as in signs of wear and stress before you hit the trail.

    On short rides of 10 miles or less I bring:

    1. Signal Whistle.
    2. A very Small Bell attached to my bike frame. (Wild life will avoid you if they hear you coming)

    on 11 mile plus rides I bring the above and:

    1. Water ( A CamelBak to hold the few things I bring)
    2. 2 Power bars
    3. Bear spray (if you live in bear country you know what I'm talking about)
    4. A small survival/first aid kit containing:
    (a couple alcohol pads, dermal adhesive, 12 feet nylon para cord, 10 feet duct tape, a couple 50 gallon trash bags, small sharp knife, tweezers, LED flash light, Bug juice, fire starter and a needle and a few feet of thread)
    5. Multi-tool (Cannondale Lefty Head Wrench Multi Tool)
    6. Spare chain links, PowerLinks (2)
    7. Compact tire pump.
    8. A spare tube.

    In all, I suggest you play around what you need and what you're willing to carry. One key thing, pack things you can get more then one use out of if possible.

    Enjoy the trails!

  35. #135
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    70
    This is awesome. Thank you to everyone who has contributed!

  36. #136
    Mulleticious
    Reputation: BigwheelsRbest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,484

    Tyre boot

    Great thread - awesome information.

    I can't believe that no-one has mentioned a tyre boot though. I've had tyres split on me and you need to stick the tyre boot over the split.

    Also, I go tubeless, and on long rides carry the small 2oz bottle of Stans with me and a couple of CO2 cylinders to air up again. A tube would be fine but we have thorns everywhere and need the continued protection against flats.

    Oh, and headache tablets too - especially if you're on the second day of a lads weekend away

  37. #137
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2
    This has been very helpful! Thank you to everyone who posted.

  38. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    23
    I ride with an Ogio backpack and cram all of the following in, can get kinda heavy but its all stuff I have needed at one time or another on the trail to keep me from having to walk back to the car.

    -Hex head multi tool
    -Pump
    -Shock pump
    -2 spare tubes
    -1 large bottle of water
    -2 power bars
    -Chain tool (and a few spare links)
    -H&K P2000 V3 .40 loaded with Hydrashocks + 2 spare loaded magazines (because I'd rather be caught with it than without it)
    Blackhawk Serpa holster (which I've mounted inside the big pocket in such a way for quick access)
    -Cell phone
    -Wallet
    -Camera (when I remember to pack it)
    -Full tang knife

    Say what you will about packing a gun when you ride, but when you have the pleasure of running into tweekers, prostitutes, & other sorts of unsavory characters willing to rob you of everything you have on you I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. I'd mount the thing on the headtube if I could get away with it.

  39. #139
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ep1nephr1ne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    131

    ace bandage

    i can't think anything i'd rather have then an ace bandage in my bag and ive used one for more than just a sore ankle.

    can be used as a splint, blindfold, sweat band, sling, cabel tie, ect. ect....
    women and bikes are my heaven

  40. #140
    Masters' class Clydesdale
    Reputation: Nadamamasboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    68
    Wow, this thread is nothing short of amazing, some very good ideas here!!
    Tighten it 'til it strips - then back it off a quarter turn

    MTB Name = The Executioner

  41. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    220
    It's been mentioned several times in this thread, but not actually formally said. When out in the back 40, it's best to bring a biking buddy along.

  42. #142
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    220
    Quote Originally Posted by Halfrican
    Good quality tweezers. Thorns and splinters!
    ... and ticks.

  43. #143
    Me ride.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    174
    I may have overlooked these from above, but:

    Pen and paper
    Digital camera

  44. #144
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    133
    water, munchies, first aid kit

  45. #145
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    23
    On trips where I may travel more than a couple hours from home, I also bring a spare wheel. I kept my old wheel set when I upgraded, and it has come in handy since I have taco-ed my wheels before on a trip that was a few hundred miles away from home. just something to consider as well if you have an extra wheel

  46. #146
    Have Cake and beat it 2
    Reputation: AusMTB Orienteer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    291
    hmm
    camel back hawg
    multi tool
    puncture repair kit and a couple of spare tubes
    couple of spare co2 cartridges.
    lube
    first aid kit when out bush
    mobile phone
    I live in aus and some of the places I ride re define remote. also I ride in 30 degree plus heat so water is essential.
    as my rides usually run to two hours gu gel is good to have as well as a bottle filled with sports drink and 3 litres water. all of which is usually consumed on the ride.
    the event managers that run the MTB orienteering events usually put up bush toilets to take care of those needs. but TP or wipes aren't a bad idea.
    This sounds a lot, but im a clydesdale so its only a little extra weight and camelbaks can be suprisingly good at avoiding injury as well as the water also protects your back in an off.
    ie hittting a pocket of sand at 30km an hour. went sideways off the firetrack and rolled, few grazes, got up and back at it.

  47. #147
    mtbr member
    Reputation: omegachicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    56
    In my camelbak i keep a lot of things....

    Crank bros multitool (with chain tool)
    Water
    Granola bars
    Tire levers
    2 tubes
    Map of the area i'll be riding
    Lube
    Small pump
    Tire boot
    small amount of duct tape
    electrical tape
    a rag of some kind
    If it's cold i also have arm/leg warmers and a balaclava

  48. #148
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jimbowho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    733

    Floss

    Dental floss. I know it's good for what it's intended for. A Cliff bar can wreak havic if stuck in the tooth.

    But!!! A one inch 1000 ft! spool is good for many other options. Like stringing a bush to bush space blanket hanger. The stuff is beyond strong and weighs nothing. Never needed it but some Desert racing Gal suggested it so I carry it.

  49. #149
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jimbowho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    733

    Floss

    Looks like I can't delete? Still learning. Moderator will stumble on here eventually.
    Last edited by jimbowho; 01-16-2010 at 03:08 PM.

  50. #150
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3
    An idea from my hunting buddy. Take a fine point sharpie and wrap duct tape around it and wrap electrical tap around the cap. Kills 3 birds, with 1 stone.

Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 13 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •