1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Page 24 of 27 FirstFirst ... 14 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 LastLast
Results 576 to 600 of 657
  1. #576
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    13
    Got some good ideas on here. Thanks

  2. #577
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    14
    Thank you. All of the beginners info on this forum are really helpful and I very much appreciate all the effort that has gone into it.

  3. #578
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    16
    thanks for the ideas. sub'd

  4. #579
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    313
    Just scanning - along with the first aid kit, you need the knowledge to use it. A Wilderness First Aid or First Responder class goes a long way to taking care of people and yourself. Google SOLO schools or Outward Bound.

    To most people's first aid kits, I would make a few additions/changes.

    Meds - not for any ride less than a few hours. No Tylenol, no Advil, and absolutely no aspirin (slows clotting). Those are for long term use not on the trail. Up to a point, pain is good - it lets you localize the injury.

    Add a triangle bandage and some Kerlix or ACE bandage (but don't wrap too tight) for slings, swathes, and tying splints (use branches to make the splint).

    Add nitrile gloves! You may be using your first aid kit on a buddy and not yourself. No need to share blood and germs.

    Survival blanket. Folded up they are maybe 4" x 3" x 1". Good for someone stranded for hours due to a mishap.

    View Post
    Be sure your first aid kid has iodine or some other form of sterilization, infections are nasty bits of work
    This is good advice. I have a friend who died from blood poisoning from a suspected thorn prick just 3 weeks after the event. Left a wife and year old twins behind.
    I'm so sorry that happened. Wounds should always be cleaned as part of definitive care, but not necessarily on the trail. Really, sterilization is almost impossible outside a hospital surgery room. Ambulances are not sterile, but they are supposed to be clean. Concern about infection is very low in the first hour or so - it's more important to deal with life threats, stop bleeding, and get out. If it will take a few hours to get you or a buddy out, rinsing the wound is very good. Iodine and antibiotic cream should be used if you can get the wound truly clean and properly bandaged (as you learn in a WFA/WFR course). A thick antibiotic cream might only be putting a water resistant layer over the bacteria, keeping it moist and warm and happy.

    I have zero experience or training with Quick Clot or military dressings with clotting chemicals on them. I personally wouldn't use them if bleeding can be controlled with direct pressure.

  5. #580
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by SlickWilly8019 View Post
    Some form of a handgun for snakes and dangerous animals 2 & 4 legged kinds(CCW)
    I have to agree with this one. It's rare that I am away from the house without at least a subcompact 9mm and spare mag. In the woods even more so.

  6. #581
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    34
    This thread isn't just useful for beginners. It's also good for those of us who are returning after a long hiatus and can't remember what we use to carry.

  7. #582
    CSC
    CSC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post


    I'm so sorry that happened. Wounds should always be cleaned as part of definitive care, but not necessarily on the trail. Really, sterilization is almost impossible outside a hospital surgery room. Ambulances are not sterile, but they are supposed to be clean. Concern about infection is very low in the first hour or so - it's more important to deal with life threats, stop bleeding, and get out. If it will take a few hours to get you or a buddy out, rinsing the wound is very good. Iodine and antibiotic cream should be used if you can get the wound truly clean and properly bandaged (as you learn in a WFA/WFR course). A thick antibiotic cream might only be putting a water resistant layer over the bacteria, keeping it moist and warm and happy.

    I have zero experience or training with Quick Clot or military dressings with clotting chemicals on them. I personally wouldn't use them if bleeding can be controlled with direct pressure.
    high-percentage zinc ointment.
    Amazon.com: Bacitracin Zinc Ointment 1 Oz / 28 G (Pack of 4): Health & Personal Care

    Or hydrogen peroxide in a small squeeze bottle. The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid. Then apply the ointment, and bandage if wanted/needed to keep blood from getting on stuff. Repeat and let it air out once at home (no bandage).

  8. #583
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    I'm always going to be a new at this sport.

    I don't keep a ton on me, but an emergency blanket definitely helps.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  9. #584
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    14
    at least i can prepare some stuff before off to the road

  10. #585
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    313
    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    high-percentage zinc ointment.
    Amazon.com: Bacitracin Zinc Ointment 1 Oz / 28 G (Pack of 4): Health & Personal Care

    Or hydrogen peroxide in a small squeeze bottle. The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid. Then apply the ointment, and bandage if wanted/needed to keep blood from getting on stuff. Repeat and let it air out once at home (no bandage).
    I'll look into the Zinc Bacitracin. Thanks.

    Be aware that hydrogen peroxide can scar - it kills some of your cells along with the bacteria. It also hurts.

  11. #586
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post

    Be aware that hydrogen peroxide can scar - it kills some of your cells along with the bacteria.
    Track cred with your buddies

  12. #587
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    313
    Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory lasts forever. Mountain bike rides get more epic with each re-telling.

  13. #588
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post
    Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory lasts forever. Mountain bike rides get more epic with each re-telling.
    I have a scar on my chin that I used to try to hide, but I've grown used to it and I actually kind of like it now. It's slowly going away though. And my story isn't very epic. I was just being stupid and riding over my head.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

  14. #589
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2
    this is awesome good thing i bought most of this stuff

  15. #590
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    8
    This is a great thread! Gives good insight to ideas of items to bring on the trail. I always have gear on me from a small first aid kit, to a BOB in my car, and to a GOOD tote at home. Some really good ideas about items to keep on a person off in the woods riding.

  16. #591
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    10
    I am just posting this because I need to make 5 posts before I am allowed to create a new thread on the forum.

  17. #592
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    10
    Great thread. Thanks for sharing.

  18. #593
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    12
    thanks for the ideas. great stuff.

  19. #594
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    160
    Great suggestions, just getting back into riding and will definitely be putting together a 'must take list'!

  20. #595
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    9
    Good Stuff

  21. #596
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    The foaming action helps draw out dirt, and is also a sterilization fluid.
    Something I learned in home brewing "you can't sterilise a turd". Meaning something has to be clean before it can be sterilised.

    For what it's worth. Great thread, thanks everyone.

  22. #597
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    4
    awesome! answers to questions I've had.

  23. #598
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the info.

  24. #599
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    Good Stuff

  25. #600
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Spifficus View Post
    A couple of safety pins, for temp repairs of torn Camelbak straps, broken zippers, etc.
    thumbs up for the safety pins. very nice to have when your hydration pack or seat bag is falling apart

Page 24 of 27 FirstFirst ... 14 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •