1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yoric52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    35

    Moto or Specialized?

    I posted this a few days ago in the Moto section, but haven't received any replies. Maybe this is a more fitting forum.

    This may seem like a basic question to some of you with with more experience with bikes than me, but any help is greatly appreciated.

    For the past two years of have ridden my first bike, a Rockhopper hardtail, and due to some lower back problems I'm looking to upgrade to a full suspension bike. I've really had my eyes on a 29er.

    My ride style is more of trail riding with some mediocre technical sections. No five foot drops or crazy jumps.

    Currently I'm trying to decide what the best value is between:

    1) USED (from ebay) 2011 Stumpjumper FSR 29er comp. perviously test bike version, but was not used as a test bike. Approximately $1600 - $1800

    2) Motobecane Phantom 29 FS XTR 20sp
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...9_fs_xtr20.htm
    $2000

    I know some people are not huge fans of BD, but their latest line of 29er's looks fairly nice. Their frames seem to have come a long way. The main dilemma I'm facing is a lack of in-depth knowledge of components.

    Taking into consideration parts, frame, etc. What is the best value here?
    -Chris

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,144
    The Stumpjumper is pretty well-regarded. I rode a FS 29er the other day and it felt ridiculously huge to me. Doesn't mean you wouldn't like it...

    One of my teammates bought a full-suspension bike for similar reasons a few years ago. He hated it! It also didn't do anything for his back. He's back on a little aluminum 26er hardtail now, and much happier.

    Demo some FS bikes and see what you think before you spend money.

    Some things that can cause back pain on a ride and have nothing to do with suspension include pushing too high a gear, bad fit, and standing to climb more than your back has the endurance to deal with. Something that FS might help is if you tend to be really tense or leave your butt parked on the saddle when you're rolling over rocks and roots, or riding rough sections of trail. But even on a FS bike, you should be posting.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    7
    diddo, demo some bikes to see what feels best to you. thats all that matters

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    76
    I believe the "value" in a bike is how it performs on a trail, not the financials of what its components cost. Head to a good local Specialized shop and learn about the Camber 29er range. Stumpy is beautiful but you'll get more value in the long run out of a new Camber 29er in my opinion. If it's a good shop, they will be able to explain why there is so much more trail "value" in the camber or stumpy than the motobecane.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    90
    Also consider resale value. Your Motobecane will have very little, while a name brand bike will hold its value.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    47
    If you are upgrading only because of your back issue I would go get your current bike fitted for you. Getting a new bike might not help your back at all.

  7. #7
    bikeboatbrewski
    Reputation: scottybinwv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,386
    ^^^ Do this first.

    If you are still having back issues try a Thud Buster.

    If you really want a full squish buy the best bike you can afford.

  8. #8
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,767

    Some clarity....

    Quote Originally Posted by pdeco1 View Post
    Also consider resale value. Your Motobecane will have very little, while a name brand bike will hold its value.
    Used bikes don't really hold their value. Once it's used, it's value drops immediately. Roughly 25% each year. At about the 3rd year, it's worth more to you as a second bike vs. selling it.

    I don't use resale value as a choice for selecting a bike.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    Used bikes don't really hold their value. Once it's used, it's value drops immediately. Roughly 25% each year. At about the 3rd year, it's worth more to you as a second bike vs. selling it.

    I don't use resale value as a choice for selecting a bike.
    I would for the entry level. Trek and Specialized have a guaranteed 200-300 resale regardless of the components. People see the badge on the side and they cough up the cash.

    For the 2kplus though I don't see that it matters that much. Not many people want to spend 800 on a used bike regardless of components.

  10. #10
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,455
    Quote Originally Posted by austanian View Post
    I would for the entry level. Trek and Specialized have a guaranteed 200-300 resale regardless of the components. People see the badge on the side and they cough up the cash.

    For the 2kplus though I don't see that it matters that much. Not many people want to spend 800 on a used bike regardless of components.
    Ken has a point, but then I sold a FrankenSS I built from an unknown brand naked aluminum ebay frame for $300.

    I would not buy the BD bike. Sure, it's got XTR and other flashy components. But I've learned about the value of having good wheels. I will never buy a bike with crappy wheels again. And the wheels on this bike? Cheap to keep costs down. Not even tubeless ready. I'd rather have a better wheelset and lower end drivetrain parts (simply downgrading to SLX would save how many hundreds off the bottom line that could be reinvested in better wheels?)

    And what's up with the maximum tire size of 2.3"? I have 2.4's on my 2003 stumpy and could possibly fit 2.5's in there. the extra cush of wide tires is also well worth it.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 93
    Last Post: 07-14-2010, 09:37 AM
  2. Specialized Riders Club Moto Krzr
    By mattKHS in forum Specialized
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-11-2007, 03:52 PM
  3. Quasi-Moto vs. Moto-Lite vs. El Guapo
    By woodyak in forum Titus
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-18-2006, 08:49 PM
  4. Titus Moto Lite, Yeti 575, Cannondale Prophet or Specialized 120?
    By boboso in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-02-2005, 12:21 PM
  5. Quasi-Moto or Super-Moto
    By roadrunR in forum Titus
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-05-2004, 10:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •