1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Moto Fantom comp ds vs rockhopper

    Hi,

    I just got a 2008 rockhopper disc the other day and I like it alot, but after riding it for a couple of days I think I really do want a FS bike, and I found a couple of motobecane fantom comp ds used or demos for a decent price, and would like some opinions. Am I just nuts and having buying remorse? I would like to here about this moto from people who have it. any issues with it? one of the ones im looking at is a new 2006 model so it only has the judy shox and the std ario rear shock, not the 2.2. As far as the rockhopper, My brother wants it, so I can sell it to him no problem. Here is my OP buying, a new bike. Bought a new bike now :)

    Thanks,
    Colin

  2. #2
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    there are other bikes out there besides motobecane. and there's really nothing that great about them, since they're old frame designs with closeout components packages on them. you can get similar deals on much better bikes if you shop around.

  3. #3
    The Martian
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    I'd rather have a rockhopper than a Motobecane.

    1) First buying priority = fit. You can't ride a Motobecane first and unless you've had quite a few bikes and have a good handle on how numbers translate to fit for you you are playing Roulette. Not a good idea IMO.

    2) Second buying priority = get the best frame my money can buy. I upgrade around my frames; arguably the most expensive part of a bike to replace (certainly one of the most). I'll gladly take a better frame with lower end components. There's nothing wrong with Motobecane's frames, but there is nothing exceptional about them either. They are an older suspension design that someone picked out of a book and slapped their brand stickers on. I'd rather have something with more R&D and pride put behind suspension and frame design than a mediocre frame with fancy parts, especially when I'm thinking about full suspension. Full suspension bikes all have different ride characteristics and when you ride good ones you really can appreciate the difference that good engineering makes over simply ok engineering.

    IMO, go ride your bike. Put some miles under your belt. Build up your technique (arguably hardtails force you to pay more attention to this). Figure out just what style you are going to be riding. THEN start thinking about an upgrade. No point in upgrading to an XC rig now (even if you love the way it rides) and then realizing you really want to try all mountain. You have the luxury of having a bike that's a "jack of most trades" right now; take advantage of it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by eat_dirt
    there are other bikes out there besides motobecane. and there's really nothing that great about them, since they're old frame designs with closeout components packages on them. you can get similar deals on much better bikes if you shop around.
    I am looking for a full susp bike for $700 bucks shipped. Could you point me in the right direction? So far I havent found anything the compares to the moto for 700 bucks, but I'm willing to look at it all.

  5. #5
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwcolin
    I am looking for a full susp bike for $700 bucks shipped. Could you point me in the right direction? So far I havent found anything the compares to the moto for 700 bucks, but I'm willing to look at it all.
    sette makes decent softies, too. and pricepoint isn't an ass like bikesdirect.com.

    or iron horse for that matter.

    and i guarantee you can scrape up new FSRxc at an LBS for a little over 900.

  6. #6
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    How about these http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/IGN-SPT-Details.html? My problem is that im on about a 700 budget so I have to stay with either a used or internet FS bike to get something halfway decent. and I think with a bad back the FS would be nice.

  7. #7
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    lol, CougarTrek's word is being ignored, I'm agree w/ thou

    @ that price point, I don't think anyone would recommend/suggest a FS bike,
    maybe a Yukon FX, you may wanna try eBay / Craigslist
    Upgrade what you need, not what you Want.

  8. #8
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    I would honestly stick with the Rockhopper and ride it for now until you have the opportunity to go with a decent full suspension bike. Maybe even put one on a 90 day layway or something and make payments to the LBS if you need to.

    Your height and weight are about where I am as well. When I was test riding bikes I found that to be an issue with the lower priced full suspension models. Maybe if I was around 200lbs or lower it would have felt better. I have to agree with eat_dirt here and suggest going with a Specialized FSR XC if you can somehow afford it.

    Just my 2 cents.

  9. #9
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    Like others have said ride your HT for a while before upgrading. A brand new 700 dollar FS is not worth having and you will regret it. A used ONE yeah you will find them but how abused has it been before you buy it. Save your 700 bucks keep adding to it and soon enough you will have more money to spend on a good FS

  10. #10
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    edited...

  11. #11
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    I got a 2008 Giant Trance 2 for $750 from a local bike shop. That's a nice frame with decent components and it's a Giant. I was in the same predicament as you about 2 weeks ago and I was looking at the Ibex, Motobecane, Iron Horse Warrior 4.0, Mongoose Otero Pro. I shopped around lookin for 08 models and lucked out on the Trance 2, i believe it's a much nicer bike than any of those others, has lifetime frame warranty, and is perfect for upgrading components later. Anyways, if ur lucky you can try to find a closeout 08 model somewhere, they are out there. But I have to say out of the 4 cheaper options I was looking at Motobecane, Ibex, Mongoose, and Iron Horse I liked the Ibex the most.

  12. #12
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    O by the way, dont fall for the BS those places try to sell you that the bikes are some how 50% off of their imaginary MSRP. What is a MSRP that the bike is never ever ever ever ever sold at? Who makes up this MSRP?

  13. #13
    Ride the dream
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    You havent really said (and I cba to trawl through all your posts looking) how much experience you have.
    How long have you been riding? What sort of skill levels are you at?

    Hardtails are much better for improving skills on - so if youre a relatively new rider, its a much better option (if you're aiming to get some skills built up).

    My honest opinion would be that if youre a relative beginner, stick with the hardtail - upgrade a few parts if you feel like it along the way.
    Then in a year or two, get yourself a frame and build it up with your own choice of parts (borrowing a few from your rockhopper if you want to).



    Quote Originally Posted by gnarboots11
    Who makes up this MSRP?
    Greedy advertisers trying to make their product appear better value than it truly is.
    Yes, moto's seem decent value on the whole, but not as much as their inflated MSRP's and (for the sake of politeness lets say) over-enthusiastic owner would have you believe.

  14. #14
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    If you have a Giant dealer near by check out the Yukon FX, this is a great bike for the money. Probably could get an 08 for around that amount or an 09 for a little over 800.00. Check out the reviews on the bikes you're interested in, but I'd be inclined to buy something you could test ride first, you'll be happier in the end and have the support of your LBS. Good luck

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwcolin
    How about these http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/IGN-SPT-Details.html? My problem is that im on about a 700 budget so I have to stay with either a used or internet FS bike to get something halfway decent. and I think with a bad back the FS would be nice.
    With a bad back, fit is even more important.

    You can alter you geometry a bit by employee riser bars or stems to provide a little more upright riding position. You can even try a suspended seatpost to take a little of the edge off. But poor fitting FS bike will be just as bad on your back. A proper fitting bike is going to provide more comfort to allow for longer rides. As you ride longer, it'll help strengthen your back.

    In addition, the key to riding a HT is that you read the terrain. When you see a bump coming up, you hover slightly over your seat rather than having weight on it. You allow the bike to move around under you and at the same time, you save your body from being bumped unnecessarily. This improves your skills and balance as well as strengthens you. Yes, it's harder than riding an FS bike, but it will make you a better rider in the long run.

  16. #16
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    i bought the phantom comp ds for my first bike about a year ago... i love it... i have logged hundreds of miles on it and have only had minor component problems..... i have snapped 2 derailleur hangers but 1 of those times was my fault and they way i adjusted the derailleur.... but other than that i love the bike and have had no major frame issues. my riding friends all ride spec. trek, cannondales, etc. and the phantom ds hangs in there with them all. and the frame geometry is simple but proven effective....i paid an evven 999$ for this bike and it is worth every penny.....i had no problems w bikes direct. and i have even purchased one of the replacement derailleur hangers from them and they shipped it right to me..
    i love the smell of tri-flow in the morning......

  17. #17
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    Well... I sort of listened to what people said...LOL I decided to go with a full susp. bike after all. After checking out a couple at the local shops, but deciding I could not afford one from them I started looking elsewhere, and after reading mixed thoughts about the online only bikes I decided to surf ebay for a deal. I ended up with a 2007 Kona coilair (well some of it is, the drive train/handle bar/brakes/shifters came off a 2008 GT I-drive) Here is what it has--
    Frame: kona coilair 6'' travel
    Fork: 07 marzocchi all mountain sl 1, 160mm, TST5, travel adjust, rebound, 20mm axle
    Rear shock: fox air dhx 3.0
    Rims: azonic outlaw
    Tires: kenda nevegal F2.3, R2.1
    Brake: Disc, hydraulic, tectro auriga com 160mm F&R
    Rear der: sram x-7
    Front der: shimano deore lx
    Shifters: sram sx-5

    I got it for $800 bucks shipped, and I am pretty pleased with it, I have no issues with it other then a couple of chips on the down tube. It works wonderfully and rides alot better then my rockhopper, (which my brother has now) and my back is much happier on this bike too.

    Here are some quick pix..

    Thanks for all your help,
    Colin




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