1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Motiv Rockridge?

    I'm thinking about getting a mountain bike, nothing fancy as I'm probably not going to go all hard core, but something decent for simple trails. A friend of a friend is trying to sell me a bike. It is a Motiv, the model name is 'Rockridge'. I did a search on the web to see if I could find out any information on this bike, and not much came up. I'm guessing it is one of those Costco bikes, made especially for them. Does anyone know anything about this bike?

  2. #2
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    Yep, Costco clunker

    looks like a few years old too. IMHO, I'd pass on it.

    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/manufacturers/2677/

    At best, it might be worth $35. Maybe. On a good day.

    Stick to brand names. I'd spend at least $400 USD on a TREK, Specialized, Giant, Kona, or similar. If you've got $700, check the Giant Ranier, and use it as a benchmark for your search. Don't rush, there's lotsa bikes out there. GET THE RIGHT FIT, or pay heavily later.

    Find a shop that will work with you for the right fit, offer you a year of free service adjustments, and a place you like and trust.

    Good luck, Jim

  3. #3
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    I didn't see a review in the link above for a "Motiv Rockridge". Also, the two bikes in the link that got the most reviews were actually from Costco and they didn't get bad reviews, for the price of course.

    I actually compared it side by side with my g/f's 2004 Giant Boulder SE (another basic bike). They were about the same weight, Boulder SE was a tad lighter and the gear shifters/derailleurs seemed comprable, Boulder SE has Shimano Altus, Rockridge has SIS7. The only big difference I noticed was the front suspension, the Boulder SE was much smoother going off a curb. Boulder has a SR/Suntour XC60 fork. The Motiv has a RST 167 fork.

    But again, I am a newbie so I don't know if I looked at the right things when comparing. Anyway, I'm not saying I'm set on getting this bike, I'm actually a little apprehensive because of the fact I didn't find anything on this when I did a search for it on the web.

    If anyone has actually owned or ridden this bike, please let me know what you think. Keep in mind it's going to be for some casual trail riding, nothing hard core.

    Oh and yes, the guy wants more than $35 for it He wants $80 for it. It's in really good condition, looks hardly used, some of the plastic is still on it.
    Last edited by pdp76; 02-18-2004 at 04:40 PM.

  4. #4
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    it'll probably do

    but stick to easy trails; it's not designed to be a true off road bike; it will get you around OK on local bike paths and the like.

    FWIW the RST is pretty low end, strictly OEM. SIS drive train is for dept store bikes, not serious stuff and often defies any needed adjustment, but sometimes it's fine.

    If the bike fits and you're just tooling around, go for it. If not, and you want to explore MTBing and some XC trails... find a bike that's a bit higher up the food chain.

    good luck, Jim

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    but stick to easy trails; it's not designed to be a true off road bike; it will get you around OK on local bike paths and the like.

    FWIW the RST is pretty low end, strictly OEM. SIS drive train is for dept store bikes, not serious stuff and often defies any needed adjustment, but sometimes it's fine.

    If the bike fits and you're just tooling around, go for it. If not, and you want to explore MTBing and some XC trails... find a bike that's a bit higher up the food chain.

    good luck, Jim
    Thanks Jim, the info about the RST fork and the SIS components helped a lot. Even though I'm planning on casual stuff, I did want to make a point to stay away from department store components. I was hoping the Costco Motiv bike had one step up from department store components. I'm leaning away from the bike with the presented information, but if I can talk they guy down to like $50-60, I just might get it.... I mean, hey, it's $50 for a whole bike!

    One last question, what do you think about the Boulder SE, namely the XC60 fork and the Altus components? As you can see I'm basing a lot of my opinions on that bike because my g/f has it and I've ridden it.

  6. #6
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    it's an entry level bike

    (the Boulder) of reasonable quality. Suntour only makes OEM forks for entry level bikes, and Altus is 2 levels below trail acceptable stuff (LX drive train). The Boulder is a good frame, but because of a low price point, it will be heavier due to straight (non-butted lightweight) tubes, nad heavier OEM steel parts that are to keep the price down.

    It's OK to ride around on, probably a bit too heavy for the GF to do serious longer XC trail rides on, though. but it's a worthy bike for beginners and to have fun with.

    the key to all of this stuff is to have fun. so go ride some, and if you like the sport, then it's time to get serious about better quality stuff and lighter weight and harder trails.

    Cheers, come back and ask more if you get stuck, Jim

  7. #7
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    Last night at WalMart they had a few bikes on clearance, including a couple of full-suspension models for a flat $60 and a rigid 26" bike for $32. That's scary cheap.
    A man is only a man, but a good bicycle is a ride.

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