1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Mongoose MTBs...Any good?

    I just want to know if Mongoose brand is any good?
    I know it has history but I always see other brands as a recommendation.

  2. #2
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    They make everything from total junk bikes, to really pretty high end stuff thats a good value.

    Theres a stigma to riding the high end mongoose bikes. Theres nothing wrong with them at all, and frankly they have one of the better suspensions (and definitely one of the better overall values) on the market, but theres that stigma. Cycling is kind of a fashion show sometimes.

    If one of their bikes fits you, I wouldnt hesitate to ride it.

  3. #3
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    I am strongly suspecting a troll here, but here goes anyway. There is total crap sold under the name Mongoose at Walmart, Toys R Us and such. Then there is decent to great stuff sold at bike shops and various online outlets. But it all takes a bad rap because of the toy store stuff. As far as I know, you can pretty easily tell the difference because the garbage stuff has a cartoon Mongoose emblem while the good stuff has a stylized M logo. The Tyax line are competitive entry level hard tails, the Teocali is a solid full suspension line. There are other good Mongooses, can't remember the names off the top of my head though.
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  4. #4
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    I am planning to buy the Mongoose Salvo Comp 2011.
    So I'm just asking for feedback if it will be a good buy cause I have not seen any recommendation on the beginners corner.
    I like the bike, it fits me well and also my budget but, I am afraid if I buy it it is just a lemon.
    Or there are other brands better than this model?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by freebie_10 View Post
    I am planning to buy the Mongoose Salvo Comp 2011.
    So I'm just asking for feedback if it will be a good buy cause I have not seen any recommendation on the beginners corner.
    I like the bike, it fits me well and also my budget but, I am afraid if I buy it it is just a lemon.
    Or there are other brands better than this model?
    I am not familiar with that specific bike but I doubt the term "lemon" applies. Like One Pivot said, Mongoose generally presents a pretty good component spec/dollar. If it fit you well and you like it then its probably a great buy. I will look up that model in a few minutes and I might be able to provide some competitive models.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  6. #6
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    Ok, that is an entry level full suspension bike, the closest comparison I know of from the big name brands would be the Giant Yukon FX. My personal opinion, and one shared by many (but not all) of the other posters here is that at that price point your better off to stay with hardtails, depending on your intended riding of course.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  7. #7
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    Ok, thanks for the help, will look into hard tails instead

  8. #8
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    You might want to 1) Provide more details on what kind of riding you intend to do, and 2) Wait til normal daytime hours and wait for more feedback from some posters with considerably more full suspension experience.

    On a side note, I see from Mongooses website that their 2012 models aren't even available in the US. Apparently the destruction of the name here was so thorough that they have given up on selling the non toy store stuff here. Yikes!
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Test Dumby View Post
    You might want to 1) Provide more details on what kind of riding you intend to do, and 2) Wait til normal daytime hours and wait for more feedback from some posters with considerably more full suspension experience.

    On a side note, I see from Mongooses website that their 2012 models aren't even available in the US. Apparently the destruction of the name here was so thorough that they have given up on selling the non toy store stuff here. Yikes!
    Well, practically an all mountain bike? Trails, downhill, jumps.

  10. #10
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    I went to local LBS couple of month ago to see Mongoose Salvo 11 for myself , maybe its just bad luck or something , but the seatpost kept being unfixed , the shopkeeper was trying to fix it but nothing helped , so I took another bike also Salvo 11 , and the brakes werent working , so I gave up and bought a KHS 525 few weeks later from different LBS

  11. #11
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    Actually, regarding the seatpost it was the same for me and the brakes were a bit soft, but the mechanic checked the post and there was oil on it he just wiped it and also bleed the brakes and I was able to test it.

  12. #12
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    the price was also suspiciously cheap , around 600-700$ , for dual suspencion this is very low , I also dont remember where I read a review regarding the frame and it was defined as bad , so its your call of course but I would suggest looking for something with good review and good frame for sure . I didnt like how the bike "felt" for me . Hope this helps .

  13. #13
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    Indeed the Mongoose name spans many tiers of product but that is in no way to assume equality across the boards. The high-end Mongoose products found at bike shops and reputable online dealers like Performance Cycle actually share a corporate umbrella (Dorel Industries) with GT, Cannondale and Schwinn. In fact Mongoose's freeDrive linkage system is the same as GT's iDrive. The bikes you find at department stores are affiliated only by brand name and are manufactured by a company called Pacific Cycles. This is why you'll never find the WalMart models on Mongoose's official site.
    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  14. #14
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    I'd skip that one. With a little luck, you can get a hardtail with a nicer fork.

    Actually, this came up on another thread recently.

    KONAWORLD

    Kona positions it as kind of an AM hardtail.

    People's ideas of what the different riding disciplines are can sometimes lead them onto the wrong bike. AM are generally built quite heavily, for banging into things, riding flowlines, some owners even use them for lift-served DH. Keep in mind that the XC and Trail categories are still bikes designed with the assumption that both wheels may occasionally leave the ground and that descending is part of (the most fun part of) mountain biking. So if you're not actually planning to do dirt jumping, flowlines, or lift-served, AM is likely to be overkill, and sometimes frustrating. People on the site sometimes see XC as riding around on bike paths. If that's their XC, fine, but mine's a bit more robust and my XC bike does fine. (Would probably not do fine for lift-served, though, and isn't really suitable for jumping.) Trail is a bit of a compromise between the two, and very popular lately. So, be a little careful about pigeon holing yourself - it can be misleading.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    As said, Mongoose has a range of bikes. If you're in a Walmart, Kmart, Dick's, Target of similar store, chances are you're looking at a piece of crap.

    If you're in a bike shop... well, you're in a place that sells proper bicycles.

    Remember, you get what you pay for. Don't expect that $400 bike to perform at the level of a $2000 bike for very long.
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  16. #16
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    Here's a review I found of a Salvo: Mongoose Salvo Sport Review - BikeRadar

    Maybe that can be of help. At that price, you usually get better value in a hardtail but since I'm trying not to rain on everyone's budget bike parade lately you might want to also read this thread: Dawes Roundhouse 2500

    I still suggest hardtails but if you do your homework and know exactly what you're buying then you can make your own decisions based on what you think would be best for you.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimTwisted View Post
    Indeed the Mongoose name spans many tiers of product but that is in no way to assume equality across the boards. The high-end Mongoose products found at bike shops and reputable online dealers like Performance Cycle actually share a corporate umbrella (Dorel Industries) with GT, Cannondale and Schwinn. In fact Mongoose's freeDrive linkage system is the same as GT's iDrive. The bikes you find at department stores are affiliated only by brand name and are manufactured by a company called Pacific Cycles. This is why you'll never find the WalMart models on Mongoose's official site.
    Partially correct, but Dorel owns Pacific so its ALL under the same corporate umbrella. The Wally stuff is not on Mongooses (or Schwinns either) website because there's just too much of it. Each store wants "exclusive" product so the exact same bike is called a Schwinn Traverse at Toys R Us, a Schwinn High Timber at Meijers and a Schwinn Sidewinder at Walmart. And very possibly the same bike is sold as a Pacific ?????? At some other store. Much easier to just let the retailers just do the advertising for whichever brands/models they sell.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by freebie_10 View Post
    I am planning to buy the Mongoose Salvo Comp 2011.
    So I'm just asking for feedback if it will be a good buy cause I have not seen any recommendation on the beginners corner.
    I like the bike, it fits me well and also my budget but, I am afraid if I buy it it is just a lemon.
    Or there are other brands better than this model?
    I own a Mongoose Otera, the model that the Salvo replaced. They are fairly similar bikes. Its not fancy but I ride it a lot more than my Trek 4500 which runs in the same price range.
    I feel comfortable on 1 meter drops with it and do feel that the suspension has gotten me out of trouble a few times.

    As others have said Mongoose normal sells a comparable bike to the big names (trek, spec, giant) but at ~$500 less. This is to make up for getting laughed at for riding a Mongoose. For full disclosure the welds aren't the prettiest, the attention to detail isn't great and the frame is heavy. I have a feeling that Dorel is got to let the shop quality mongoose name die out so they can focus on GT and C-dale like they did with Schwinn so you may not get good future support.

    Shot answer: If your pride can stand riding the Salvo, it is a great bang for the buck.

  19. #19
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    The Mongoose shop brand IS dead in the US, according to their website 2012 models are not available in the US. The cheap crap is not sold in other countries and the name is still more highly regarded so the brand survuves there, for now.

    If the Mongoose Salvo actually sells for anywhere near its MSRP then it in not cheaper than its closest big 3 competition. The compoment spec is VERY comparable to the Giant Yukon FX and the MSRP is actually higher. The Yukon has MSRP around $1000 and the Salvo MSRP for 2011 was $1100 according to Bikepedia.com.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by faceplant72 View Post
    I own a Mongoose Otera, the model that the Salvo replaced. They are fairly similar bikes. Its not fancy but I ride it a lot more than my Trek 4500 which runs in the same price range.
    I feel comfortable on 1 meter drops with it and do feel that the suspension has gotten me out of trouble a few times.

    As others have said Mongoose normal sells a comparable bike to the big names (trek, spec, giant) but at ~$500 less. This is to make up for getting laughed at for riding a Mongoose. For full disclosure the welds aren't the prettiest, the attention to detail isn't great and the frame is heavy. I have a feeling that Dorel is got to let the shop quality mongoose name die out so they can focus on GT and C-dale like they did with Schwinn so you may not get good future support.

    Shot answer: If your pride can stand riding the Salvo, it is a great bang for the buck.
    When I went at the LBS I was looking at Cannondale bikes, but the price of this bike caught my eyes. It looks heavy and bulky when your just looking at it and a simple paint job, my wife said it looks like a Motorcycle already but I was surprised how easy the handling was, it feels light easy to control but of course, I have accepted that my budget will not get me any top of the line parts.

    Yes I saw the lack of attention to details, but for me I am going to a mountain not a bike show. So my priority is the bike's reliability. Will it break in just less than a year? or I can depend on it and trust that I will not go face down cause something broke.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Test Dumby View Post
    The Mongoose shop brand IS dead in the US, according to their website 2012 models are not available in the US. The cheap crap is not sold in other countries and the name is still more highly regarded so the brand survuves there, for now.

    If the Mongoose Salvo actually sells for anywhere near its MSRP then it in not cheaper than its closest big 3 competition. The compoment spec is VERY comparable to the Giant Yukon FX and the MSRP is actually higher. The Yukon has MSRP around $1000 and the Salvo MSRP for 2011 was $1100 according to Bikepedia.com.
    If I were you, which one will you pick?
    I have to find a Giant Yukon FX to test so I could compare.
    Maybe this weekend I will have another road trip.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by freebie_10 View Post
    If I were you, which one will you pick?
    I have to find a Giant Yukon FX to test so I could compare.
    Maybe this weekend I will have another road trip.
    Im really not the best to answer that question since I am still a hardtail fan, but I would heavily lean towards the Giant unless the Mongoose is selling for considerably less. I just think Giant is the more reputable brand at this point with a MUCH better chance of being around for your potential warranty/service needs.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  23. #23
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    My boss rides a high end Mongoose. It's around 31-32lbs with slime tubes. It's a AM rig & he uses it in races. It came with very good components but he paid $3-4k back in 2009.

    Given that, there are a lot of nice bikes at that price with stronger customer service that will be around in the future if you need them. I wouldn't risk my money on a Mongoose if I wasn't sure they'll be around in a few years.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by freebie_10 View Post
    Yes I saw the lack of attention to details, but for me I am going to a mountain not a bike show. So my priority is the bike's reliability. Will it break in just less than a year? or I can depend on it and trust that I will not go face down cause something broke.
    I would be worried about that.

    Every bike ridden off-road suffers some mechanical problems in a year of riding. The minor stuff is inevitable, I think.

    But I'd be worried about failures that actually matter. Read some threads and reviews on that fork. I haven't owned one myself, so I won't say more than that about it.

    BikeRadar also mentions that adjustable travel business worrying them in terms of long-term ownership.

    The bike's got one of my pet peeves - a Suntour crankset. Most of the ones that show up as OEM parts have a non-standard BCD. It means you have to throw out the whole thing when you damage a chainring. Kind of a wtf if you ask me.

    I'd look for some long-term reviews (if there are any) on the suspension linkage. With the company pulling out of the US market, you may not be able to replace it if you break it.

    Some of these things (crappy fork, disposable crank) are becoming more and more of the norm on bikes at this pricepoint. Although the Kona has a reasonable fork and crank... If you can't replace a broken suspension link, though, that's pretty much the end for the whole frame. These usually have much more limited warranty coverage too. So read the Mongoose warranty.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I would be worried about that.

    Every bike ridden off-road suffers some mechanical problems in a year of riding. The minor stuff is inevitable, I think.

    But I'd be worried about failures that actually matter. Read some threads and reviews on that fork. I haven't owned one myself, so I won't say more than that about it.

    BikeRadar also mentions that adjustable travel business worrying them in terms of long-term ownership.

    The bike's got one of my pet peeves - a Suntour crankset. Most of the ones that show up as OEM parts have a non-standard BCD. It means you have to throw out the whole thing when you damage a chainring. Kind of a wtf if you ask me.

    I'd look for some long-term reviews (if there are any) on the suspension linkage. With the company pulling out of the US market, you may not be able to replace it if you break it.

    Some of these things (crappy fork, disposable crank) are becoming more and more of the norm on bikes at this pricepoint. Although the Kona has a reasonable fork and crank... If you can't replace a broken suspension link, though, that's pretty much the end for the whole frame. These usually have much more limited warranty coverage too. So read the Mongoose warranty.
    I did not realize that there are a lot of factors in buying a mountain bike. With the limited budget I have I need to consider all of this or else it will all go to waste.

    Thanks all for your feedback I will take my time to check on reviews. I have to research more.

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