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  1. #1
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    Man my butt hurts

    Hey all, as the title says. My butt is really hurting since I have started riding.. Is it my seat, my posture, my butt not being used to it, or a combination of the 3?

    And if it's just my butt needing to get used to riding, how long will it take for me to get used to it, to where there isn't pain any more?

  2. #2
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    saddle position: height, fore/aft, angle, etc.
    saddle choice: you might need to try a few.
    get used it: it takes a little time.

    (you are wearing padded cycling shorts, right? duh.)

  3. #3
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    Re: Man my butt hurts

    Does it hurt when you pee?

    When I first started riding without padded shorts my scrotum area hurt a tad and it hurt to pee te day after. I got padded shorts and bamn, problem solved.

    Now it its you but but that's hurting, that's normal if your just starting off, specially if your riding with clipless, your giving that booty a good work out :P

    Posture usually translates to the lower back discomfort, but it doesn't hurt to play with the seat height to get it to fit your needs.

    Then agian this is just my first post soo, don't take me to seriously

  4. #4
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    It doesn't hurt to pee, just after I get done riding my butt is sore.. And no, I'm not wearing padded shorts lol. didn't know there was such a thing

  5. #5
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    Without padded shorts, a typical cycling seat is nothing more than a draconian torture device. That said, there is most definitely a break in period of about 2 weeks in which all the mating parts get used to each other. Let's face it...you've never remained seated (with all the other movement going on) on such minimal support for any lengthy period before, right? Gonna take a little time.

  6. #6
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    I started biking a month ago and boy was I sore after a ride. In the beginning it took a couple of days before I recovered. Mostly I would not feel it much unless I would get onto the bike again. Now that I have been riding 25-30km 3 times a week, I feel it a lot less. There is still a bit of tenderness, but I figured out the denim jeans I am usually biking to and from work in actually have the pocket seams right where I sit on the saddle. I biked 35-40km last weekend wearing trousers without back pockets, and felt hardly anything when riding the day after.

    I have been suffering from lower back pain on and off for a long time, luckily not having issues the last 3-4 years. When biking I noticed that I was bending in the lower back rather than straightening up. Changing that helped generate more power, and it also rotated my hips so I rested better on my seat bones. That helped too. Different people have different distances between the seat bones. If you don't feel significantly less pain after riding regularly for a month or so, then I would suggest that your seat may be too narrow (or wide). Some bike shops have an "ass-o-meter" that measures the distance between your seat bones, they can then recommend a saddle that fits.

    I do not use padded shorts, but I am considering buying a pair to try out, but for now I am just riding in street clothes. I can literally feel my seat muscles growing as I ride, I suspect that has a lot to do with it. Crack on, see howe it goes!

    Michael

  7. #7
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mid_Mo_Biker View Post
    It doesn't hurt to pee, just after I get done riding my butt is sore.. And no, I'm not wearing padded shorts lol. didn't know there was such a thing
    Get some, and do not wear underwear under them. Store brands like Performance are usually a good value. Cheapest, and least conspicuous version are liner shorts, like from Nashbar ($15) worn under some regular shorts, but if you can get past the false modesty thing, proper lycra shorts are the best.

    But then, you do get used to it and can ride without padded shorts..

  8. #8
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    As already noted, playing with the seat position can make big difference. I have mine fairly well forward on the rails so I don't end up sitting on the narrow bit up front, and I've found that having it nose up by even a couple of degrees starts to really hurt. Start with it absolutely level and work from there. And of course, different seats work better for different folks.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Get some, and do not wear underwear under them. Store brands like Performance are usually a good value. Cheapest, and least conspicuous version are liner shorts, like from Nashbar ($15) worn under some regular shorts, but if you can get past the false modesty thing, proper lycra shorts are the best.

    But then, you do get used to it and can ride without padded shorts..

    Thanks for the replies guys, and it is definitely getting better every day.
    also, I found these Amazon.com: Men's ATD Cargo Short Baggy Padded Mountain Bike Cycling Shorts: Clothing

  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    How much riding have you done?
    Where exactly does it hurt?
    How does it hurt? (skin irritation, pressure over "sit bones", numbness, ...)

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    How much riding have you done?
    Where exactly does it hurt?
    How does it hurt? (skin irritation, pressure over "sit bones", numbness, ...)
    I just started riding a week ago. And it's none of the above.. Just tender..
    But like I said, It's getting better every day.

    (edit) and don't laugh. But I am only riding about 5 miles a day.. I'm over weight and out of shape.. Trying to work my way up to more riding though, Cause I love it!

  12. #12
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    A week with short rides is not all that much - so, for the time being, I'd put it under "not being used to riding".

    Keeping it short is probably good, until you get used to being on a bike.

    If you start noticing some specific ways that it hurts, small adjustments may help. Sometimes people really do need a different seat because the stock one is too wide/too narrow/wrong shape/too soft/too hard/ (insert some more saddle characteristics).

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    A week with short rides is not all that much - so, for the time being, I'd put it under "not being used to riding".

    Keeping it short is probably good, until you get used to being on a bike.

    If you start noticing some specific ways that it hurts, small adjustments may help. Sometimes people really do need a different seat because the stock one is too wide/too narrow/wrong shape/too soft/too hard/ (insert some more saddle characteristics).
    Sounds good, and thank you all for all your help.

    One more thing and it's off topic. But do you all know anything good for joint/knee pain? I had my right leg rebuilt years ago (fell from a third story balcony), and it hurts pretty bad after riding

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    For knees, it is best to stay in a gear that is easy enough to turn. People talk about 80 rpm (or some other figure from 60 to 100) but it is hard to stick to some rpm number if the trail has any bumps. Learn to move your feet smoothly in circles, instead of stomping up and down.

    Seat height has an effect on knee health too. Too low makes the leverages pretty hard on you and too high lets your knees go too straight which can really mess you up.

    My quick and dirty seat height adjustment goes like this:
    - pedal with the HEELS on pedals
    - raise the seat until you can barely do it without rocking the hips
    - Now, when you have the ball of the foot on the pedal, there is still a little bend left in the knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke.
    Many prefer to have the seat a little lower than that for riding bumpy trails

    I mainly ride a singlespped bike, so I always know what gear I'm in When the cranks get a little hard to turn, I get out of the saddle. That changes the leverages on the knees, in addition to giving more power, and doesn't seem to bother my knees even though there must be pretty considerable forces between my heavy body and my pedals.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  15. #15
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    I would emphasize having a good mtb saddle that fits you and then playing with orientation. I like the nose up just a wee bit. It's worth time and money.
    I'm afraid of heights so a 26'r fits me to a T.

  16. #16
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    after a few weeks you get used to it. padded shorts really help like the above say.

  17. #17
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    From my own issues I recommend getting shorts with removeable liners. The ones that are sewn into the shorts tend not to stay in place which can cause chafing

  18. #18
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    First 2 rides I ever took, I wore regular old shorts.... not a wonderful experience at all. Then my friends all talked me into getting a pair of cycling shorts.... I will never ride without them anymore!!

  19. #19
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    cycling shorts... definitely helps... at the minimum... wear a liner under any shorts of your choosing. But riding time to get used to the seat will be just as important. just keep in mind that you are sitting on something and moving around in an area that you are not used to (get your mind out of the gutter). So once you get used to riding and develop basically a callous on your arse... the better you will be.

  20. #20
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    If the two bones in your butt that your sit on ( ischial tuberosities, aka "sit bones") are what's hurting, then good. They are what should be carrying your weight. The pain will probably go away as you get used to it, or a change of saddle might help too.

    If the pain is in the soft tissues of your groin, then your saddle is badly set up or more likely just too narrow. The back end of the saddle should be wide enough to catch your sit bones, not press up in between them.

    Here's a quick starter guide to getting your saddle set up:

    Adjust the height so that with your heel on the pedal and the pedal at 6 o'clock, your leg is straight. When you move the ball of your foot to the pedal it will be slightly bent. This position is for max power. Adjust to suit. For stability and a lower center of gravity on rough terrain and steep downhills, it is common practice to lower the saddle.

    Start with the saddle level. Again adjust to suit.

    Fore/aft adjustment will depend on how stretched out you wish to be. That aspect of cockpit set up can also involve the handlebars and stem.
    Last edited by Gasp4Air; 08-23-2013 at 12:28 PM.
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  21. #21
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    Stand on the pedals when it starts to hurt. Aside from temporarily relieving the pain, you'll also build serious leg strength really quick.
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  22. #22
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    Hey all, I stopped by my local cycling shop and bought some apparel. AND OMG do padded shorts make a huge difference! Other than the fact that I tried to wear them at first with boxer briefs ( that didn't work very well), And the fact that it looks like I have a massive maxipad in my shorts lol. Thanks for recommending padded shorts!

    I also purchased a pair of padded gloves to help with the blisters I was getting, and those made a huge difference as well!

    Thanks for all of your guys feedback and I'm sure I will be back with more noob stuff in the future :-)

    Happy Biking ~ Tyler

  23. #23
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    OP i suggest spending some money on a good pair. I bout a pair of fox baggy mountain bike shorts with the removable liner. They were about 100 brand new, but they work wonderfully. The also do not chafe like many of the cheaper brands do. Consider the investment.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sock Monkey View Post
    Your butt is defective. If you're not too old, you can return it under warranty.
    I loled

  24. #24
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    I use the Chow Pat knee braces/supports. Have two bad knees and they work well.

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    I can say that at the start my but and my knees hurt pretty much all the time (I was riding 10 miles a day 6 days a week), for the but pain, I bought a padded seat. And it has helped a lot. For the knees I bought Glucosamine with Chondroitin, I took that for about two month, then I stopped. My knees are now in good enough shape that they don't hurt anymore (even after doubling my riding.) I also put my seat higher so my legs could straighten out a bit more. They are still bent, but not as bent... (I can still touch the ground while in my seat. Tippy toes but I can touch.)

    I'm also a big guy... But ya, the but does take getting used to. It took me like 3 weeks before it was fine...

  26. #26
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    Weak taint. And get some proper shorts.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mirrorsaw View Post
    I bought a padded seat. And it has helped a lot.
    My problem with soft seats is ... I sink into them: more contact area, more chafing.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    My problem with soft seats is ... I sink into them: more contact area, more chafing.
    Hard seat + proper cycling shorts >>> gel seats. Padded seats suck.

  29. #29
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    Re: Man my butt hurts

    I ride in basketball shorts with a bontrager gel commuter seat (and I'm 270lbs) never have a complaint. I have "proper" bontrager mtb shorts and hate them. Extra pad is nice but beyond that the spandex liner is nothing but insanely annoying and limits free movement of my legs as they add resistance to movement.

    But not saying don't buy shorts, I say try them. I personally just don't like them so just kept riding till my rear now isn't bothered by and riding I do regardless of duration.

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  30. #30
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    There's not all that many of us who do fine without padded shorts. I still much prefer firm seats (haven't tried stuff like bare carbon fiber). I mainly ride singlespeed - and a rigid bike - which may help as I spend a lot of time out of the saddle.

    Curious: I've seen one or two other posts mentioning that spandex restricts movement. Perhaps that is a characteristic of spandex liners in baggy shorts? Most say that one major reason they wear tight spandex is that it does not restrict movement when cycling, and doesn't get hung up on the seat.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    My problem with soft seats is ... I sink into them: more contact area, more chafing.
    I'm having an issue with chafing. I might just take the pad off and see if that helps. (I'm sure I sank into the gel pad when I got it, but it helped cushion the blow from the bumps.) I'm sure by now my sit bones are strong enough to handle it on their own.

  32. #32
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    Going over bumps it is often best to get out of the saddle, or at least take more of your weight with the legs. Depends on bumps and the amount (or lack) of suspenion on your bike, of course.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  33. #33
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    They are small bumps in the bike path. (I have front shocks, but they are pretty much a joke. Granted me being overweight doesn't help them any.) Thanks for the tip I will be doing that today. (also removing the gel seat cover.)

  34. #34
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    Getting off the seat or unweighing can help even over bike path bumps. My commute has a some rough spots: "ripples" in the path surface and one or two "waves". The waves can really throw me off balance if I don't pay attention and ride over them like a sack of potatoes. When I unweigh the seat, the bike can rock under me, while my body keeps moving straight ahead. Going over curbs - even minor ones - I find it much more comfortable to lift my backside an inch or two.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  35. #35
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    Re: Man my butt hurts

    +1 on unweighting seat, that's a lot of how i get by in normal shorts and gel seat, I always just outta habit unweight seat for bumps or go completely up for rough stuff.

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  36. #36
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    Your ass will toughen up.

    Chaffing is relatively easy, get cycling shorts, I usually wear underarmor legging with basketball shorts over them.

    After your ass stops burning from the seat you can get into adjustments, I had to get mine all the way back and tipped down slightly....but I also think that I'm a little long in the torso for my frame (at least for commuting duty) and I've started using the brake levers as aerobars when I'm commuting (I I was looking at some bar extenders at the LBS today and I have ideas).

    ....and I have about 700 miles now on the stock seat them came on my hardtail.

  37. #37
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    Another thing to keep in mind is the saddle width. I've been mountain biking for years, when I sold my old bike and bought a new one, my ass started hurting.
    It had been a long time since I bought a new saddle and was surprised they came in widths now. See if your local Specialized dealer has a butt gauge in store. You can get your sit bones measured and find the right width for you.
    I'd actually recommend this to anyone.
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  38. #38
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    Good ole Baboon Butt syndrome. It will take a little time to get used to but will eventually go away. A good pair of bike shorts helps. Like others have said, if the problem persists or your junk starts going to sleep then your saddle could be the culprit.
    Let's make like a Bike and get the Huck outta here...

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    If the two bones in your butt that your sit on ( ischial tuberosities, aka "sit bones") are what's hurting, then good. They are what should be carrying your weight. The pain will probably go away as you get used to it, or a change of saddle might help too.

    If the pain is in the soft tissues of your groin, then your saddle is badly set up or more likely just too narrow. The back end of the saddle should be wide enough to catch your sit bones, not press up in between them.

    Here's a quick starter guide to getting your saddle set up:

    Adjust the height so that with your heel on the pedal and the pedal at 6 o'clock, your leg is straight. When you move the ball of your foot to the pedal it will be slightly bent. This position is for max power. Adjust to suit. For stability and a lower center of gravity on rough terrain and steep downhills, it is common practice to lower the saddle.

    Start with the saddle level. Again adjust to suit.

    Fore/aft adjustment will depend on how stretched out you wish to be. That aspect of cockpit set up can also involve the handlebars and stem.
    my butt bones and the perineum area are both sore as hell. i adjusted the seat to be higher and its much better to ride. however i still feel the seat is too narrow and too hard. going to get a wider and softer seat. also, my mtb doesn't have an adjustable handlebar stem and its really awkward riding it, which is definitely a contributing factor to my soreness as well. any recommendations on the stem to get?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by konoplya View Post
    my butt bones and the perineum area are both sore as hell. i adjusted the seat to be higher and its much better to ride. however i still feel the seat is too narrow and too hard. going to get a wider and softer seat. also, my mtb doesn't have an adjustable handlebar stem and its really awkward riding it, which is definitely a contributing factor to my soreness as well. any recommendations on the stem to get?
    I suggest you go to a bike shop and get some input from an experienced employee. You may even wish to spring for a fitting session where they attempt to adjust everything for you. However, getting comfortable often boils down to experience and experimentation.

    I cannot recommend a stem. The brand doesn't matter. Stems come in different lengths and angles. A 25 degree stem will raise the bars higher than a 5 degree stem, and also bring them closer to you than the 5 degree version of the same length. The other way to raise the bars is with riser bars, where the bars bend up from the stem clamp. Typical risers go from 1/2 " to 2 " of rise, but higher rises are available.

    So you need to decide what you wish to achieve. Higher grips? Grips further/closer to you? All of the above?

    As far as grip height goes, I suggest you make them about the same height as the top of the saddle. Some folks like them a bit lower, some a bit higher, but equal is a good place to start.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  41. #41
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    I had a similar problem when l started riding again this year.
    I replaced the rock hard saddle on my bike with one that looked similar but had about 1cm of padding.

    After a few rides it started to get better and now l can spend a couple of hours on the bike without wearing padded shorts, and l am still pain free.

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