1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Maintenance issues bumming me out :(

    As much as I hate to say it but my bikes has been plagued with problems causing such as: adjusting/resetting the brake calipers since they either rub, or the rotors hit against the brake housing them selves making that *ziiinnngg* sound because the QR never settle properly in the dropouts, and my bottom bracket has some play making a clicking sound every revolution.

    Today I noticed that my brakes where rubbing again, so I took out the wheel and the brake pad. But this time one of the pistons wasn't moving simultaneously with other piston or wasn't moving at all. Gave the lever a few squeeze to see if it could moved again (Probably a fatal mistake which I'd hate to admit to my mechanic) and the piston popped out with hydraulic oil oozing out... I popped the piston back in to see if it could work back to normal, nope.

    Sigh, guys advice please? This is really bumming me out, I just hope there could be a quick fix. I'm just scared that I'd be held responsible and the guys at the shop will have to tell me I have to pay them to fix or replace the brakes. II also had this bike for a month now.

    Link to bike: Diamondback Overdrive Comp 29er Mountain Bike - 2014 Performance Exclusive -

    Greatly appreciate it guys for reading this.
    Bark.

  2. #2
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
    Reputation: Zachariah's Avatar
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    Bike shop can determine if you need warranty brake replacement. Do it.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  3. #3
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    Air is in there. Time for a bleed.

  4. #4
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    Alright, thank you guys.
    Bark.

  5. #5
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    Maintenance issues bumming me out :(

    It's a 2014 bike so take it back and tell them to sort it. As for the leaking mistake, put it back together and tell them to sort it under warranty


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  6. #6
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    QR's should not move in the dropout, put a little weight on the bike to make sure the axle is seated in the dropout, and tighten the QR, it should leave a small indent on your palm. if it just swings closed easily, it's not tight enough and the wheel will move when you put pedaling force on it.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Wheel Removal and Installation
    My bike MCA kinda climbs like a billy-goat. WOO WOO!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shupack View Post
    QR's should not move in the dropout, put a little weight on the bike to make sure the axle is seated in the dropout, and tighten the QR, it should leave a small indent on your palm. if it just swings closed easily, it's not tight enough and the wheel will move when you put pedaling force on it.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Wheel Removal and Installation
    It's only the front brakes I have a problems with since I never take off the the rear wheel for transport. What I do is I attach the wheel, get on top of the bike, add some weight by leaning against the handle bar, then I move the bike forward and backward to make sure it's settled in, then I close the QR lever. It still always settles in a different position even if I use the same amount of force previously to close the lever.

    I'm going to the shop tomorrow, hopefully they can fix this quickly. Eventually I wanna be able to service the bike my self without making any catastrophic mistakes >_<

    This bike is my guinea pig.
    Bark.

  8. #8
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    Ur putting too much effort into setting the qt fyi. Set the forks down on the drop outs, use ur hand to pull down a little on the top of the fork and close the qr. You should be getting resistance roughly when the handle for the qr is straight out same angle as the axle.

    Its a serious pain with 9mm qr and disc brakes to get it perfect every time. I get lucky about 50% of the time, rest I gotta recenter caliper... But oddly enough almost never have an issue with the rear lol.
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  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Am I the only person who's never had this problem?

    I do pretty much as described above: put some weight over the front wheels and then close the quick release.

    Since the brake is hydraulic in this case, you should have even less of a problem. At least, as long as you don't accidentally blow out a piston, like you did this time. Hydraulics self-adjust. So in future, if you're hearing that "ping," don't worry about the wheel right away. Engage the brake firmly, with the wheel in place, a couple times and see if the pads retract to the right spot. If your rotor's landing off-center, maybe just start your ride and re-check it a couple miles in.

    One piston being stuck is a little more serious a problem, and I have to admit it's not one I've ever solved myself. I drop the bike at my shop at that point. I have excuses, of course, but don't crack open any of the fluid systems on my bikes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=AndrwSwitch;11296538]Am I the only person who's never had this problem?
    QUOTE]

    I've also never had a problem with a QR and discs.

    This really sounds to me like operator error. I doubt there was anything wrong with the brake or bike itself that should make this any sort of 'warrantee' issue. If you go in to the shop where you bought it, tell them what happened and see what the charge is to fix your brake. They might take pity on you and hook you up super cheap (and give you a lesson on how to install your wheel while you're there).

    Also, keep in mind that your entire brakeset, front and rear, including rotors, is replaceable for under $100, so it's not like you're talking any sort of major dough here. I'm gonna guess you can probably replace the lever/caliper for less than the cost of a case of beer.

    Amazon.com : SHIMANO BR-M446 BL-M445 Hydraulic Brake Front & Rear Black RT56 160mm Rotor : Bike Disc Brake Sets : Sports & Outdoors
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  11. #11
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    Rotors go out of true. They are easy to true back up. just bend 'em. cheaper ones go out of true easier. just grab them with a clean rag. A shop does essentially the same thing to true a rotor, but they might use a gauge and a rotor truing fork to be a little more precise about it. If the caliper was set up correctly, it probably won't need to be messed with.

    As for making sure the wheel is in straight all the time, it's not hard. Set the wheel in the dropouts. With the QR open, you should be able to feel when it is and is not in straight. When it is straight, close the lever.

    NEVER squeeze the brake lever of a hydro brake when the wheel is not in place. You just learned why. Your brakes need bled. You will have to pay for it.

  12. #12
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    Re: Maintenance issues bumming me out :(

    As a beginner, it's easier for me to turn the bike upside down to properly attach the wheel.
    What works for me may not work for you. What's best for you depends on many factors. We are different from each other.

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