1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Luv my new DB Response sport but.....

    My next bike I will want the option to lock out the front fork! When I'm gettin it up a steep hill, my 265lbs of ass puts to much force on the front fork, and not enough to the pavement.



    Funny, I was looking on DB's website just the other day and in 2012 they made a response, response sport, response comp, and a pro, I believe the comp had the lockout fork. Looks like they discontinued it for 2013.
    Last edited by presta24; 01-18-2013 at 01:43 PM.

  2. #2
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    I don't know if this applies to you as I'm a newbie also. Just now passing 2 month point, but at first I was feeling the same that I need to lock out to climb. I've noticed, if I pedal harder before the climb and use the momentum I can keep the shock not locked and can get up. Guess it depends on how steep and how long the climbs are. I'm 220, so I'm not a light weight either

  3. #3
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    Ya, i don't have a whole lot of seat time in it yet. I'm sure I can make it work. I'm terribly out of shape, it amazes me the workout a short bike ride gives me. I never thought of riding a bike for exercise. Glad I did because I always loved riding my mb when I was a kid.

    I think my next bike will be a hard tail 29er with a lockable fork. Maybe another DB or nishiki. Who knows, by then that might change.

  4. #4
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    You can always upgrade your fork to one with a lockout. See rockshox reba or fox f32 series. Both can be had in 26" for cheap. I ride a full suspension and think I maybe used lockout once to do a 4 hour climb.
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  5. #5
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    As it was mentioned before, you could always upgrade your fork to one that has lockout. If you're riding a lot on pavement and not so much on trails, I would suggest getting a rigid fork instead of a suspension fork with lockout. It would be cheaper and serve your purposes better.

  6. #6
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    First off, you need to get a stiffer spring for your fork. The one that comes equipped is for someone whose weight is in the 90% percentile, you exceed that. So it's natural that you would be getting more bounce than someone else.

    Cheap lockouts are mechanical and prone to breaking. In order to get a fork worth having a lockout on (one that won't break the first time you accidentally hit a pothole) you need to spend for something with a hydraulic lockout with a blowoff.

    Just remember that you're not used to having a suspension fork and it takes some getting used to. You paid for a suspension fork, use it. I never use lockout except when climbing fire roads on my single speed; and even then it's only sometimes. Suspension actually adds efficiency for almost every situation, but that only applies if your suspension is set up for your body weight properly.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    First off, you need to get a stiffer spring for your fork. The one that comes equipped is for someone whose weight is in the 90% percentile, you exceed that. So it's natural that you would be getting more bounce than someone else.

    Cheap lockouts are mechanical and prone to breaking. In order to get a fork worth having a lockout on (one that won't break the first time you accidentally hit a pothole) you need to spend for something with a hydraulic lockout with a blowoff.

    Just remember that you're not used to having a suspension fork and it takes some getting used to. You paid for a suspension fork, use it. I never use lockout except when climbing fire roads on my single speed; and even then it's only sometimes. Suspension actually adds efficiency for almost every situation, but that only applies if your suspension is set up for your body weight properly.

    Thanks! Where can I go about getting a different spring? My company gives me $250 a year towards exercise equipment. I was thinking of selling this bike next year and buying a better one with the $250 next year plus whatever I get out of the used one. But If I can just replace the spring....might go that rout.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by presta24 View Post
    Thanks! Where can I go about getting a different spring? My company gives me $250 a year towards exercise equipment. I was thinking of selling this bike next year and buying a better one with the $250 next year plus whatever I get out of the used one. But If I can just replace the spring....might go that rout.
    Start where you bought the bike, then try branching out to your LBSs.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    First off, you need to get a stiffer spring for your fork. The one that comes equipped is for someone whose weight is in the 90% percentile, you exceed that. So it's natural that you would be getting more bounce than someone else.

    Cheap lockouts are mechanical and prone to breaking. In order to get a fork worth having a lockout on (one that won't break the first time you accidentally hit a pothole) you need to spend for something with a hydraulic lockout with a blowoff.

    Just remember that you're not used to having a suspension fork and it takes some getting used to. You paid for a suspension fork, use it. I never use lockout except when climbing fire roads on my single speed; and even then it's only sometimes. Suspension actually adds efficiency for almost every situation, but that only applies if your suspension is set up for your body weight properly.

    Best post here

    Stiffer spring, and let the suspension work for you. I don't use the lock out or propedal on my bikes front or rear, why? If the fork is doggin you it's probably because you are putting way too much downward pressure on your handlebar, try using your core more when pedaling. Remember "Light hands and heavy feet" makes happy ride.

  10. #10
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    ^^This^^ and...

    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    First off, you need to get a stiffer spring for your fork. The one that comes equipped is for someone whose weight is in the 90% percentile, you exceed that. So it's natural that you would be getting more bounce than someone else.

    Cheap lockouts are mechanical and prone to breaking. In order to get a fork worth having a lockout on (one that won't break the first time you accidentally hit a pothole) you need to spend for something with a hydraulic lockout with a blowoff.

    Just remember that you're not used to having a suspension fork and it takes some getting used to. You paid for a suspension fork, use it. I never use lockout except when climbing fire roads on my single speed; and even then it's only sometimes. Suspension actually adds efficiency for almost every situation, but that only applies if your suspension is set up for your body weight properly.
    You must spread some reputation around before zebrahum can receive any more from me. Typical good advice contained here.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Best post here

    Stiffer spring, and let the suspension work for you. I don't use the lock out or propedal on my bikes front or rear, why? If the fork is doggin you it's probably because you are putting way too much downward pressure on your handlebar, try using your core more when pedaling. Remember "Light hands and heavy feet" makes happy ride.
    and centre your body more on the saddle to help with the soft hands.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    the big aussie rep bomb is comin your way

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Best post here

    Stiffer spring, and let the suspension work for you. I don't use the lock out or propedal on my bikes front or rear, why? If the fork is doggin you it's probably because you are putting way too much downward pressure on your handlebar, try using your core more when pedaling. Remember "Light hands and heavy feet" makes happy ride.
    Been doing this and its been working. Was into mtnbiking in the 90's cut my teeth on rigids. Took a while to get used to front suspension w/o lockout.

  13. #13
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    Where are you when you notice the bob?

    I now have lockouts, but only use them on roads. For the fork, that doesn't include a fire road - I usually leave it active on those.

    Part of it can be your pedaling technique. The fork shouldn't receive a lot of input from smooth seated pedaling.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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