1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Lowering Handle Bars?

    I sat on the new Treks and the handle bars seem kinda high for my taste. Is it possible to lower the handle bar height and is this ill-advised? Thanks

  2. #2
    ...the wave won't brek
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    It all depends on the bike and the set up.

    Most bikes have spacers under the stem. you can easily remove the stem and a few or as many of the spacers that you want.

    Does your bike have flat bars of riser bars?

    If it has riser bars you may want to look at going to flat bar.
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  3. #3
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    I'm relatively new to the terminology and equipment, but not new to riding.

    Not sure what a riser bar is... is it just a curved handle bar? On my old trek bike, the hanlde bar is straight and that's what I'm use to... but on the new treks, the handle bars are curved a bit and seems too high for me.

    When asking if you could lower the bar, I was referring to the bar on new Trek bikes.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    ...the wave won't brek
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    It sounds like bike you are looking at have standard riser bars on them.

    You can put a flat bar on there if you like
    2008 Santa Cruz Superlight SPX-XC Kit

    2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR-XC Comp

    2006 Specialized Allez Sport Double

  5. #5
    I post too much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tygger
    I'm relatively new to the terminology and equipment, but not new to riding.

    Not sure what a riser bar is... is it just a curved handle bar? On my old trek bike, the hanlde bar is straight and that's what I'm use to... but on the new treks, the handle bars are curved a bit and seems too high for me.

    When asking if you could lower the bar, I was referring to the bar on new Trek bikes.

    Thanks!
    Which model are you looking at exactly, there are what.. 20 models of trek bikes?

    I'd start by moving the spacers around from under the stem to over the stem and see how it goes, it they are still too high, then you may want a flat bar. If they are STILL too high, a stem with less rise will bring them down some more.

  6. #6
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    Sorry, I was looking at the Trek 6000.

  7. #7
    don't move for trees
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    removing spacers is the easiest and cheapest way to mess around with the height, just keep one spacer between the stem and the frame.
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  8. #8
    local trails rider
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    And you need to know which bolts you need to loosen and tighten in which order. Parktool should have instructions on their website.

  9. #9
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    I agree with moving some spacers above the stem. Another option is to flip the stem. If you buy the bike new, the bike shop should help you with the adjustment, possibly even swapping out the stem for you.

  10. #10
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    Ugly solution

    Quote Originally Posted by bh357
    I agree with moving some spacers above the stem. Another option is to flip the stem. If you buy the bike new, the bike shop should help you with the adjustment, possibly even swapping out the stem for you.
    Of course you can do that, but a stem pointing downwards with a riser bar on it looks really bad... Worse than putting bar-ends on a riser. If lowering the stem doesn't help, get a flat bar.

  11. #11
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefanos
    a stem pointing downwards with a riser bar on it looks really bad...
    No it doesn't...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefanos
    Of course you can do that, but a stem pointing downwards with a riser bar on it looks really bad... Worse than putting bar-ends on a riser. If lowering the stem doesn't help, get a flat bar.
    In my case, I'm running flipped Mary bars, with a 10deg stem (flipped). The stem looks near horizontal when mounted. I am considering putting one of the (10mm) spacers back under the stem, or possibly going with a 5mm spacer.


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