1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    115

    Low-riser bar or flat bar

    What are the differences and the strengths of each? If it is a personal preference, why do you prefer one over the other. I am trying to decide.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,850
    Ok. I will 'fess up and admit that I prefer the "look" of a riser-bar.

    There. I've said it. I'm so ashamed.

    As far as strengths of one over the other, the real issue to think about is how leaned over you want to be. I have a couple of bikes that I made rideable -- for me -- by changing the rise of my bars.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    497
    It is more about fit, rider preferences, and the purpose of the bike than it is strengths vs weaknesses.

    Flat bars will make you lean over more, so there will be more weight on the bars and front wheel. This is a good position for climbing, so you see this setup most often on XC trail/race bikes. But while that position is good for climbing, it won't work as well for descending. Like Jonathan mentioned, changing the rise is also a way to adjust the fit of your bike.

  4. #4
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Flat bars are generally lighter at the same strength than riser bars. It use to be that to get a wider bar with more back sweep...you had to go with a riser. That is no longer the case, several companies such as Salsa, Niner, and Titec offer flat bars with the same width and sweep as riser bars. And the height can be adjusted with the stem rise so you are not necessarily bent over more than a riser bar.

    I rode riser bars for over ten years because that was all there was for wider bars with a nice back sweep. But now days, I ride a wide flat bar because my 29er has a higher front end and I like my hands to be lower. My flat bar weighs ~100 grams lighter than the equivalent riser bar.

    In the end, its all choice...but you can get the exact same hand position in a flat bar with a higher rise stem as you can with a riser bar.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    30
    This kind of off topic, but is it possible to raise the height of the handle bars at where the stem connects to the fork?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,531
    If you have extra room on the steerer tube, you'll have spacers above the stem, you can swap the stem and the spacers around, making the bars higher.

    If you don't have any more room on the steerer tube, you can get a stem with more rise.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •