1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Looking to buy Trek 3700 Disc

    This will be my first bike not bought from department store. Did some research and this one seems to be a beginner bike with mixed reviews I would say but it is like the cheapest.

    My Intention: casual riding and I like to work on the mechanics of the bike.

    Any suggestions. Also looking at Revel 1 but it's $100 more expensive.

  2. #2
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    are you going to be riding mountain bike trails? anything remotely technical, downhill, climbing? the 3700 is basically a hybrid with knobby-ish tires. it's a solid bike for bike paths or mild hardpack, but it's going to let you down if you're looking for a gateway bike for mountain biking.

  3. #3
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    I will be just doing minor offloading , something like light bike trail. The problem is my budget of $500 and no more. I just wanna get a decent bike and at my level, I don't think i can tell the difference between a cheap bike and a more expensive bike.

  4. #4
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    Both Revel 1 and 3700 Disc seem to have the same exact Suntour XCM 100mm fork. Revel has the slight advantage of better shifters/derailleurs (some people will debate this even) but its not worth extra $100. If you are willing to go used on craigslist you could find a comparable bike for $300 or a significantly better bike for $500.

  5. #5
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    if you live near a college town graduation is happening so hippie yard sales would be a good place to find a higher end used bike

  6. #6
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    The 18"/M Revel is 0.6" longer in the top tube than the Trek 3700 in the same size, so the seated position on the Revel will be a little less upright . . . . For better or worse depending on your riding needs/style/terrain.

  7. #7
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    Good morning, thanks for all the suggestions. I don't really want to go used until I understand more of these bikes. I am currently in another hobby(Radio control cars) and I realized that buying used for the first RC car can be a really bad thing if you are unlucky. But once I understand more about these bikes, I will know what to check and look for in an used bike. I will go pick up the 3700 Disc today.

  8. #8
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    Amazing how many RC car enthusiasts find mountain biking. Since you used the RC analogy, think of entry level mountain bikes (like the Trek 3700) as you would an RTR RC car from a company like Losi or Associated. It will get you out there and doing it, but eventually and if you stick with it, you're going to want upgraded equipment. That said an entry level bike isn't meant to be your dream ride. Just like an RTR, it gets you going, and then you can invest more into the right vehicle for you once you decide which type truly suits you. In RC cars, you might start out with a 10th scale off road gas truck and then find you prefer an electric 4WD buggy. It's a good thing you didn't invest a ton into that first RC car, as it would take that much longer to save up for the vehicle you really want and you'd have lost more on the resale value as well. The same logic definitely applies to cycling. Get out there on entry level equipment, hone your skills and then see what type of riding you really enjoy. If you really enjoy the sport, start saving for your dream machine.

  9. #9
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    Hi Jeff, I totally agree with you. I just want to try it out first. I don't want to and probably not going to spend $1000 into my first bike.

    The shop is building up the 3700 for me and will be test driving it next week. I hope it will be an alright bike for light trails.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by samguan View Post
    The shop is building up the 3700 for me and will be test driving it next week. I hope it will be an alright bike for light trails.
    It will be fine for light trails and some intermediate trails as well if you have the legs and pick the right lines. The fork will disappoint you (in my experience with it) although pretty reliable. The wheels can be easy to bend which is why I said to pick the right lines earlier . Overall decent bike

  11. #11
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    Ok. I still couldn't make up my mind. I went to test drive the Hardrock and the Giant Revel 1 today.

    The Hardrock is $569, Revel 1 is $599 and the Trek 3700Disc is $499.

    The thing that lacks on the 3700 is the double wall RIM which I am afraid might bend in the future. Also the Revel 1 has 24 speed where as the Hardrock and the 3700 only have 21 speed. The Hardrock Sport which has 24 speed and better front suspension is $679 which is out of my range.

  12. #12
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    The Trek sounds like it meets your needs. Yeah, a stronger rim is good but it's not like it will bend with light trail riding and no jumps. It may get a little out of true but that even happens with stronger, better quality rims.

    Build a good relationship with your lbs and enjoy!
    - 1995 Giant ATX 870
    - 2011 Salsa El Mariachi XL
    - 2011 Kona Unit (singlespeed) XL

  13. #13
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    I know this is my first post, but I was in your exact position a few weeks ago. My wife and I were buying new bikes for our kids and I decided that after years out of the saddle it was time for me to get a new bike too. I didn't want to go the used route, so I did some research and decided that the 2012 Trek 3700 Disc would be perfect for my current needs.

    Went to the LBS and after picking out and paying for the kids bikes, I went about trying out the 3700. I don't know what it was, but the bike just didn't feel right. The salesperson suggested that I look at the 2012 Specialized Hardrock Disc. When I did, I fell in love with the bike. The fit was exactl what I was looking for. And, while it was slightly originally more expensive than the Trek, I got a great discount because it was the 3rd bike I bought that day.

    Specialized recently updated their website and it looks like they updated the specs on the Hardrock Disc. I'm a little upset about that, but I plan on upgrading stuff down the road anyway. The Hardrock is a great bike, with a solid frame and components that can be easily upgraded. I recommend it.

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