1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
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    Long time rider, New member. New bike or re-vamp old?

    Hey everyone. Been riding for years, but finally signed up! Looking to get back into the sport, but I am a little hesitant on which route I should go.

    Currently, I ride a 1998 Raleigh M60. Manitou front fork, kore stem, easton handle bars, etc. Nothing spectacular as I really pieced the bike together when I was 15 (over 12 years ago). The bike is still in great shape and hasn't given me any issues in all the years. Frame is in good shape with some scuffs and scrapes. Definitely could use a tune up though.

    My question at the moment is to either revamp the m60 with the works. New gears, wheels/tires, brakes, etc. Get the bike repainted/powdercoated and just bring it up to the year 2013.

    OR

    Get something newer with updated components and technology. I was looking at a used Trek Fuel Ex8, Raleigh Talus 29 Elite, or something along those lines.

    Not my bike or my picture. Just an example of what it looks like. Has orange manitou fork up front and different steam and bar, wheels/tires though. I'll try to get a picture of the actual bike up soon.

    Long time rider, New member. New bike or re-vamp old?-acbafamimg00217.jpg

    Thanks for your feedback!!

  2. #2
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    Sell toe old bike and put the money towards a new one, you'll end up with a better bike and have more change left in your pocket.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Sell toe old bike and put the money towards a new one, you'll end up with a better bike and have more change left in your pocket.
    You think I could even get something for the m60? I figured it wasn't even worth putting up for sale.

  4. #4
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    Any decent running bike will get $100 on craigslist, whether or not that's worth it to you depends on your tax bracket I guess.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Any decent running bike will get $100 on craigslist, whether or not that's worth it to you depends on your tax bracket I guess.
    I hear ya. Well, for 100-150 bucks I would rather just hang onto it for a spare. Not worth the hassle of trying to sell it. Definitely an option I may keep open though if an opportunity does arise. Thanks!

    I just came across a 2009 Trek 6700 hardly ridden in good shape for a good price. May jump on it if the seller gets back to me.

  6. #6
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    If you have room in your garage, keep your Trek. You can use it to ride with the kids or even ride with lessor riders when the time comes.

    But definitely buy a new bike. Don't revamp old. I did that with my 96 Stumpjumper and I ended up spending the same amount as buying a newer used bike WITH disc brakes.

    In the end, contemporary mountain bike tech has come so far. Disc brakes beyond what I consider to be the biggest leap in tech.

    But it really depends on what type of trails you ride and what type of rider you are. The best thing to do is to get out there and ride the local trails, do you have some riding buddies? What do they ride? Mostly because that can dictate the pace and the terrain you'll be hitting.
    Just get out and ride!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002 View Post
    If you have room in your garage, keep your Trek. You can use it to ride with the kids or even ride with lessor riders when the time comes.

    But definitely buy a new bike. Don't revamp old. I did that with my 96 Stumpjumper and I ended up spending the same amount as buying a newer used bike WITH disc brakes.

    In the end, contemporary mountain bike tech has come so far. Disc brakes beyond what I consider to be the biggest leap in tech.

    But it really depends on what type of trails you ride and what type of rider you are. The best thing to do is to get out there and ride the local trails, do you have some riding buddies? What do they ride? Mostly because that can dictate the pace and the terrain you'll be hitting.
    Great points. Yeah I actually decided to just hang onto the M60 since it's still ridable and in good shape. It could always be used as a spare, or as you said for a buddy looking to tag along who doesn't have a capable bike.

    The more I looked into it, the more I started leaning towards getting a newer bike. When I started putting pieces together, it really started to add up and came close to a complete bike that I could have already assembled. I agree, disc's are a great improvement over the typical v-band's.

    I like to do technical stuff and have improved over the years when I was riding. Of course, always more to learn everytime you go out. I just like to do a lot of downhill and trails. Nothing too crazy though.

    Yes, I have a few riding buddies who have similar riding skills/abilities as I do. Most of my friends ride Trek's, so I am naturally drawn to them since I have had some experience riding them while switching bikes on the trail. Besides my raleigh, I haven't had too much seat time with anything else. Rode a few specalized's, but wasn't too impressed with them. We are all in great shape, so our pace is usually pretty quick depending on the trail. I usually have no problem keeping up the beat.

  8. #8
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    Well, if you'll endulge me...

    About 5yrs ago, my (road) riding buddy had an injury that took him out of riding (in his words, for life.) So I took up my previous interest in MTB. I dusted off my SJ and joined a local shop ride. Ha, they were like, "What the hell??? You're keeping up with me on that dinosaur????" Yes, I was keeping up, but I was working it like a mad-man.

    So I started to do some mods.
    New tires was crucial. But the new fork, while the action and accuracy was far superior to my elastomer Rockshox, changed the geo of my frame to slow the steering and give this weird feeling of "tipping" into the turns. Not to mention, the cheaper fork started leaking the next season (I actually sold it off, but my next owner experienced the maintenance issue.)

    I picked up a new Cannondale Rush. Full suspension. That bike was so plush and accurate compared to the SJ. And disc brakes!! That got me out on the trail like 3-4x a week and got my fitness way up.

    After a while, my itch wasn't being scratched. So I picked up a rigid, single speed, 29-er. Oh, yes, a door opened to another realm of MTB-ing. Skill and fitness expanded even more. One thing I noticed is when I switched back to my Rush, I was crashing because of the different strength and weakness of each bike.

    After recovering from my injury, my fitness level fell off enough to make riding the rigid single speed too challenging. Also, it's a rather anti-social bike. Your pace is so different the rest of the pack.

    So by that time, with all the experience I gained from riding different type of bikes and different type of trails, I knew exactly what I liked and what I didn't like. Also, I happened to borrow a bike from a board member in S. Cal and I ran his spare bike. He was riding a 6x6 FS Santa Cruz Nomad and I ran his Dialled Bikes Alpine steel hardtail. Oh what fun that HT was. I was also able outclimb him and then keep up with him on the downhills.

    So my next task was to build up a steel HT of my own.

    I've been riding on that HT for the past 3 years and while I've made some refinements each year, stayed essentially the same. Love it.

    I found I love downhill riding, but don't want to risk serious injuries that could take me out of riding for a long duration and have lasting chronic pains to deal with (I'm still dealing with my lower back pains from crashing on a slippery cat-walk)

    So now, I stick with aggressive XC. Going up as well as going down.
    Just get out and ride!

  9. #9
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    In 2003 I built up a nice bike. Light weight KHS Alite4000 hardtail frame, Judy SL shock (Coil with air assist) and XT v-bakes and XT 3x9 drivetrain. In 2004 I got married and pretty much stopped riding. Then in October 2011 I started back up again. Only a little at first, but by May 2012 I really go riding again. I ride the mtn bike every weekend and most rides are not up to about 20 miles. I am riding faster, farther and better than before on the same 2003 KHS. Only change has been tires (duh) and I had replace the fork when it failed and I could not get spares for it economically. So $250 later I put a Manitou Minute Expert fork which comparable in weight, but much nicer. Otherwise the bike is the same and will hold it own on vs modern bikes. I also still have my first mtn bike. A mongoose DX6.5. This bike is my back up/loaner bike and the only weak points are the overall weight (32lbs) and crappy fork (Rockshox Indy S), but the fork was in need of upgrade back in 2002 anyway.

    Point is that these old bike still work just fine.




    I still see no reason to
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002 View Post
    Well, if you'll endulge me...

    About 5yrs ago, my (road) riding buddy had an injury that took him out of riding (in his words, for life.) So I took up my previous interest in MTB. I dusted off my SJ and joined a local shop ride. Ha, they were like, "What the hell??? You're keeping up with me on that dinosaur????" Yes, I was keeping up, but I was working it like a mad-man.

    So I started to do some mods.
    New tires was crucial. But the new fork, while the action and accuracy was far superior to my elastomer Rockshox, changed the geo of my frame to slow the steering and give this weird feeling of "tipping" into the turns. Not to mention, the cheaper fork started leaking the next season (I actually sold it off, but my next owner experienced the maintenance issue.)

    I picked up a new Cannondale Rush. Full suspension. That bike was so plush and accurate compared to the SJ. And disc brakes!! That got me out on the trail like 3-4x a week and got my fitness way up.

    After a while, my itch wasn't being scratched. So I picked up a rigid, single speed, 29-er. Oh, yes, a door opened to another realm of MTB-ing. Skill and fitness expanded even more. One thing I noticed is when I switched back to my Rush, I was crashing because of the different strength and weakness of each bike.

    After recovering from my injury, my fitness level fell off enough to make riding the rigid single speed too challenging. Also, it's a rather anti-social bike. Your pace is so different the rest of the pack.

    So by that time, with all the experience I gained from riding different type of bikes and different type of trails, I knew exactly what I liked and what I didn't like. Also, I happened to borrow a bike from a board member in S. Cal and I ran his spare bike. He was riding a 6x6 FS Santa Cruz Nomad and I ran his Dialled Bikes Alpine steel hardtail. Oh what fun that HT was. I was also able outclimb him and then keep up with him on the downhills.

    So my next task was to build up a steel HT of my own.

    I've been riding on that HT for the past 3 years and while I've made some refinements each year, stayed essentially the same. Love it.

    I found I love downhill riding, but don't want to risk serious injuries that could take me out of riding for a long duration and have lasting chronic pains to deal with (I'm still dealing with my lower back pains from crashing on a slippery cat-walk)

    So now, I stick with aggressive XC. Going up as well as going down.
    Thanks for the feedback. I know there are plenty of different options out there to choose from. I guess I like to try a bit of everything and see what I really excel at and enjoy. As you said, downhill can be fun, but a little too danergous for me as I ride more for recreation and to stay in shape (besides the gym). Trail riding and XC is more than accommodating for my style of riding and enjoyment. I was looking into full suspension bikes, but found it less agile than a HT. I'm 27, so I am still able to bounce back fairly quickly from an injury, but I know it's not going to stay like that forever!

    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    In 2003 I built up a nice bike. Light weight KHS Alite4000 hardtail frame, Judy SL shock (Coil with air assist) and XT v-bakes and XT 3x9 drivetrain. In 2004 I got married and pretty much stopped riding. Then in October 2011 I started back up again. Only a little at first, but by May 2012 I really go riding again. I ride the mtn bike every weekend and most rides are not up to about 20 miles. I am riding faster, farther and better than before on the same 2003 KHS. Only change has been tires (duh) and I had replace the fork when it failed and I could not get spares for it economically. So $250 later I put a Manitou Minute Expert fork which comparable in weight, but much nicer. Otherwise the bike is the same and will hold it own on vs modern bikes. I also still have my first mtn bike. A mongoose DX6.5. This bike is my back up/loaner bike and the only weak points are the overall weight (32lbs) and crappy fork (Rockshox Indy S), but the fork was in need of upgrade back in 2002 anyway.

    Point is that these old bike still work just fine.




    I still see no reason to
    Great points and definitely what I was thinking when I wanted to revamp the M60. However, when looking at a financial stand point, it doesn't make sense since getting new components would almost equal out to a whole new bike with newer, better parts. Not to mention a spare bike to have on hand for any friends or even for me if my ride of choice is down. I had my Raleigh M60 since 1998 and the bike still rids extremely well. Never had a problem with it either and I put a TON of miles on that thing.

  11. #11
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    Found a 2010 Trek 8000 locally. Picking it up Sunday! Can't wait!

    Long time rider, New member. New bike or re-vamp old?-00a0a_9ln0rutmyus_600x450.jpg

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