1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
    Dirt Abuser
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    Log across trail

    Do you intermediate / advanced guys roll over medium sized logs on the trails? Do you try to bunnyhop them? How do you get over these things without stopping?

    I slow down, clip out and need to pull my bike over them.
    "Don't ride faster than your guardian angel can fly"

  2. #2
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    Definitely get to work on bunny hopping, its such a great thing to have in the bag o tricks. In the mean time, get to know how low your outer chainring is from the ground, and if you can pop your tires over a log one at a time without jamming them into the log, go for it. Knowing how low your chainring is to the ground in relation to the height of the log will save you from making a bad choice and trying to go over a log too tall and bending the teeth.

  3. #3
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    We have quite a few logs at the local trail that I frequent. I used to slow way down, pull the front tire over and then try to pedal the rest of the way over them. Now I get a lot more speed, pull the front tire up right before I get to them and let the momentum take the back tire over. I try to pull the back tire up so that the impact with the log is not so harsh. These logs are too big to bunny hop, for me anyways. I have just jad several people tell me to try to keep the speed up while going over them so you dont lose momentum.

  4. #4
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    Of course it all depends on how big of log and what kind of bike your riding. Most of the time I either bunny hop it, jump it or roll over them theres not much you cant ride over especially with the right bike and a good bash ring. Ive included some links so you can see what im talking about with various riders taking different types of logs. Start small and work your way up, remember like rockgardens momentum is your friend.

    http://www.peterbeers.net/interests/mtb_rt/mtb_rt.htm

    http://bikeloft.com/page.cfm?PageID=188&imageid=769

    http://www.socalmtb.com/filler/db_kevin_logs.jpg

  5. #5
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    Remeber- logs rule. As long as you get over half way up, they will just roll. And by half way, I mean the angle at which the whell hits, which is about 4 inches up the back wheel. Long story short, get the back wheel over, mmentum will handle anything beyond that
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  6. #6
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    just lean back and roll it...

  7. #7
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    Depends.
    Some of the logs (fallen trees) that I encounter are in spots where I do not have the speed for hopping. If it seems doable, based on what I have done before, I'll lift the front and see if I can get the rear to follow.

    (what is a medium sized log?)

  8. #8
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    The medium logs are the ones between the small and large sizes Its subjective mainly, a large log to you or me might be someone elses small log. And true that about getting the front wheel over. Its nuts what the back wheel can get itself over if the front has already cleared the obstacle.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime

    (what is a medium sized log?)
    Guess it's really subjective.... There are logs that I run across on a certain trail that are on a doubletrack sized trail going downhill and the size of the fallen tree is about a foot and a half high. (I'd say around ~15"-20")

    I can bunny hop my bike, but never tried a log this size. I just worry about hitting my back tire on it and going over the bars.
    "Don't ride faster than your guardian angel can fly"

  10. #10
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    Another take....

    If you have a lot of logs that you are routinely running your rear wheel into, you probably want to start working on better techniques for getting over logs. Especially if you are riding a hardtail. Bunnyhopping is fine if you have lots of speed and confidence that you can clear whatever log you are trying to go over. However, short of J hopping (which I still cannot do), the most reliable technique I have found is to pop the front wheel on top of the log, and then, when the front wheel is on the log, do a forward and upward lunge with your hips to pull the rear wheel up over the log. When you do the lunge, push the bike forward underneath your body with your arms to keep from going over the handlebar. It takes some practice, and the best place to start is with some uphill "steps" to get the feel for pulling the wheel up. This technique will add longevity to your rear wheel, as well as allow you to go over logs much bigger than you could ever roll. Good luck!

  11. #11
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    Really there are too main ways:

    Ride over it, lift the front, and pedal or glide (if you have the speed), just unweight the rear wheel so it can roll over the log.

    Jump it, lift the front and the rear wheel off the ground far enough to clear the log, you must have enough speed.

    Really not smart to mix the two ways cause you end up over the bars, when the rear wheel catchs the log if you have too much speed.

  12. #12
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    Ummm....

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Really there are too main ways:

    Ride over it, lift the front, and pedal or glide (if you have the speed), just unweight the rear wheel so it can roll over the log.

    Jump it, lift the front and the rear wheel off the ground far enough to clear the log, you must have enough speed.

    Really not smart to mix the two ways cause you end up over the bars, when the rear wheel catchs the log if you have too much speed.
    I'm not really agreeing with you here. Granted, if you are great at jumping you can employ that approach much of the time. But on anything over 3-4 inches, I'm definitely hopping the rear wheel the way I described. Yes, it does take practice, and you really do need to be careful to get the bike out in front of you when you are lunging over the log (especially on bigger things), but since I've learned the technique my wheels and chainrings have a dramatically improved lifetime. While this technique can be done at a reasonably decent speed, its best done with just enough momentum that you can maintain a straight line while going over the log.

    I should add that I have (and will again someday) gone over the bars going over logs this way, it is nothing compared to trying to jump something at speed and not clearing it

  13. #13
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    I am getting much better at jumping the logs...up to 12 inchs.

    You do need to have the speed, and often there is kinda of a ramp in front of the logs.

    The ride'm way works well but you can get hung up on the big chainring, on top of the log.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bail_Monkey
    Guess it's really subjective.... There are logs that I run across on a certain trail that are on a doubletrack sized trail going downhill and the size of the fallen tree is about a foot and a half high. (I'd say around ~15"-20")

    I can bunny hop my bike, but never tried a log this size. I just worry about hitting my back tire on it and going over the bars.
    (my take is on the descent only, going over logs uphill will be different) Just lift the front tire over the log and the back tire will follow just move your weight back on the bike from the 70/30 attack position as you go over the log. Also helps to push your palms forward and straighten your arms as you shift your weight back like when jumping to avoid OTB. Practice makes perfect and your confidence will grow as you do it more, have fun!

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