1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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Thread: Lock out??

  1. #1
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    Lock out??

    When exactly should I be locking out my forks?

  2. #2
    What could go wrong ...
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    lockout is typically used when climbing steep terrain
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  3. #3
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    To add on to the question:

    I stumble upon a steep unexpected climb, I don't have enough time to lockout both fork and rear shock: which do I choose first?

    -james
    [SIZE="1"]2000 Trek 6500 HT
    2008 Ibex Asta Comp X7 FS[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    rear

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woods1986
    When exactly should I be locking out my forks?
    The only time that I use my fork lockout is when riding through deep sand. I've found that engaging the lockout dramatically increases steering control through the sand.

    I know that hill climbing is commonly cited as an example of where you'd use fork lockout, but IMO, it has to be a long smooth climb with some out-of-the-saddle sections for it to be worthwhile.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by yimmy149
    I stumble upon a steep unexpected climb, I don't have enough time to lockout both fork and rear shock: which do I choose first?
    Neither. IMO, it's best to have an active suspension on steep rocky climbs.

  7. #7
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    I don't like using my lock out. I have a harder time climbing with it on. For short steep climbs, if you have a lockout option on your rear shock, it's probably not worth fiddling with it as the climb is fairly short. Just hammer it out. On a longer climb, set the stiffer setting for the rear shock and go for it.
    :wq

  8. #8
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    I just use the lockout when riding on paved roads.

  9. #9
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    I also only use the lockout option on road anything else is off.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Resist
    I just use the lockout when riding on paved roads.
    me three.

    And don't forget to tweak your fork (rebound, preload, etc...) to tune it to terrain and preference.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRussell
    And don't forget to tweak your fork (rebound, preload, etc...) to tune it to terrain and preference.
    I am still trying to figure that out. I know how, just not sure what setting is good for specific terrain.

  12. #12
    Baton Rouge, LA
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinB
    The only time that I use my fork lockout is when riding through deep sand. I've found that engaging the lockout dramatically increases steering control through the sand.

    I know that hill climbing is commonly cited as an example of where you'd use fork lockout, but IMO, it has to be a long smooth climb with some out-of-the-saddle sections for it to be worthwhile.
    Ditto.

    Don't focus so much on using all the bells and whistles on your gear. Focus on solid riding techniques and picking choice lines.

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