1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    A little advice please

    Hello all looking for a little direction here. I recently,about 3 weeks bought a new talon 2 because i have been really wanting to get into the biking scene. i have been doing alot more of road riding then a thought i would (alot for a beginner) Today i just did my first 30 miles on it and i finished it fine, other then the rear end being a little sore but have been told i could do alot more on a road bike. I have only been on the trails a couple times but still intend on doing some trail rides, but it seems im going to be road alot more. So now i am looking at maybe adding an actual road bike to my garage.
    i guess my question before i spend $1200-1500 on a road bike, will it really benefit me to have a true road bike. I mean enough to justify spending more money like that. My biggest concern is how often do those little tiny tires and rims blow and break. Am i going to be that much faster on the road bike? I can average about 15mph on my talon but any more then that i am really pushing to hold that average. I guess im am just wanting to justify it one way or the other. Any advice would be great. Thanks folks!

  2. #2
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    Yes you will definitely hands down notice a difference. I love the speed of my road bike on the road. Difference is you have to watch out for potholes now! Those tubes won't blow if you keep your air pressure up to 90-100psi (for 700cx23), if you keep them at around 60psi you'll find yourself getting pinch flats (personal experience, many times...). Ever since I got a floor pump and get the tire pressure up I don't have any issues.

    You shouldn't have to worry about bending rims, unless you're going to abuse it offroad at all (again personal experince). I managed to bend a rim when I got over ambitious missing my mountain bike (being built, last one stolen) and went on some bumpy path, caught some air and bent my front rim, it trued up ok, with a slight wobble, but not bad for a ~20 year old rim...

    Also who said it had to be expensive, or new? I have an old road bike (mid to late 80's) converted to single speed (gears help in hills...) with a freehub and some eggbeaters and it works awesome. If you're doubting yourself on the value, see what you can get used.

    So summing up from my venture down this path:

    1. Keep up tire pressure to ~100psi
    2. Stay on the road & avoid pot holes and you should be good
    3. Used may be a good path to explore to see if the value of having a road bike is worth it for you rather than immediately dropping the money on it

    Hope I could help... sorry that was a little long winded.
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  3. #3
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    A mountain biker who doesn't ride road has no legs
    A road biker who doesn't ride mountain has no soul

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  4. #4
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    A road bike will hands-down be more fun and efficient on the road. As tpm said, its all about psi to keep the tires from flatting; I actually got a flat today on my road ride from a piece of glass. I put some Stan's in my tubes hoping that will prevent future flats as I have been plagued with many of them from debris. You can buy more robust tires that help if its a concern. To put it in perspective in terms of mph, the ride I do on my road bike currently I used to do on my mountain bike; I averaged at best 16 mph. On the road bike I can average 19mph for the same (or less) effort.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the push guys, i had thought about looking toward craigslist but as i am not 100% sure what i should really look at on a used bike to make sure it was a good buy i had talked myself out of it. But i think that is the way i am going go just to make sure i enjoy it as much as i like this bike. again thanks alot!! the folks on this forum are always awesome.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Make some phone calls and see if you have an LBS dealing in used bikes near you. Try to ride several different ones, then buy your favorite - it's pretty similar to buying a mountain bike, except you don't have to wonder how it'll feel on trails. (Well, I do. And I satisfy that curiosity - mountain bikes really are better. Go figure.)

    I think buying a first road bike on Craig's List is a tricky proposition. Fit's a little more sensitive than with mountain bikes, and there's no good correlation for sizing a road bike based on MTB size.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think buying a first road bike on Craig's List is a tricky proposition. Fit's a little more sensitive than with mountain bikes, and there's no good correlation for sizing a road bike based on MTB size.
    Absolutly. Fit is the most important thing about buying a road bike, which is why doing it online is not easy. I found this article this morning which I thought would be relevant:

    http://www.bicycling.com/beginners/m...ors-0?page=0,0

    Notice how the buyer test rides numerous bikes, and none seem good enough untill he happens to test ride a bike which off the floor is magically his size? If the sales guy at the first place had done his job correctly and properly sized the bike before the test ride, He would have not felt so uncomfortable. After you have more years of experience buying bikes, head to the internet. For now you'll benefit hugely from buying a road bike from a bike shop who has a good knowledge and culture of bike fit.

  8. #8
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    Well, i havent found it yet, and after reading the article Jeff posted i think im back at the new thing or atleast a used one from a bike shop. My lbs doesnt seem to have anything so it may take me a bit but i have decided that i surely need to add a road bike to the collection. thanks again folks!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    A mountain biker who doesn't ride road has no legs
    A road biker who doesn't ride mountain has no soul
    That's hilarious. I'll have to pass that on to my "DH or Nothing!" friend.
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  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff193 View Post
    Absolutly. Fit is the most important thing about buying a road bike, which is why doing it online is not easy. I found this article this morning which I thought would be relevant:

    http://www.bicycling.com/beginners/m...ors-0?page=0,0

    Notice how the buyer test rides numerous bikes, and none seem good enough untill he happens to test ride a bike which off the floor is magically his size? If the sales guy at the first place had done his job correctly and properly sized the bike before the test ride, He would have not felt so uncomfortable. After you have more years of experience buying bikes, head to the internet. For now you'll benefit hugely from buying a road bike from a bike shop who has a good knowledge and culture of bike fit.
    I finally got around to reading that article.

    Fun story.

    Actually, I had a somewhat similar experience test-riding different cyclocross bikes. Some felt sluggish, the awesome one was too expensive, but the Kona Jake in my size felt agile, ready for hammering, and I thought I could pay for it. That was the first time I took a little time over buying a bike, and test-riding several different models made to do the same thing was a bit of an eye-opener.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    There's some real good info from all you guys. And I have and love my road bikes. If I'm going on a ride with other roadies, I'm sure to take a road bike just so I can keep up. Or on an epic road ride also.
    With that being said,...I mostly take my mtb on the road because if it's for exercise I can use just as much energy doing 15 on mtb, instead of 19 mph on road bike, and it's just more fun. Don't have to worry about curbs and potholes, can jump onto trails if I want, brakes work better and are right at fingertips, can see down the road better because of higher body position, less jarring, ect. Anything under 2-3 hours and I'll most likely I'll take my mtb
    If you wanna go faster or further, get a road bike. If you wanna have fun and exercise, get some slicks/wheels for you mtb.
    My .02
    Last edited by theMeat; 08-02-2011 at 08:26 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Last edited by ForrestJones; 08-01-2011 at 09:58 PM. Reason: I posted in the wrong thread!
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  13. #13
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    My road bike. I bought a Cannondale Synapse last year but I just don't like skinny tires and the face-forward position of road bikes. This bike is fast enough on the road but I can also veer off onto a trail or roll-over a pothole with no ill effects.
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  14. #14
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    Another option is to look at a cyclocross bike. I started racing two years ago and am hooked. I like that it has close geometry to a rode bike and it is light and fast. I can put road tires on it. But also can run cross tires and hit the trails and the road at the same time. Absolutely love it. Only problem is my mountain bike is lonely.

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