1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Light Training Wheelset

    I'm looking for a lightweight wheelset to use for during the week training with a set of slicks or city tires. Wheels being unsprung weight, and toughness not being nearly the concern as with off-road wheels, I assume the lighter the better, presuming a decent rim/build. Problem is, I'm not sure what light is or if there are other things I should be considering.

    These appear light (1880g/set), and relatively cheap, can I do better without spending significantly more money?

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com...d&productId=23

    Any other suggestions on finding a wheelset for training?

  2. #2
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    For road going wheels, you can afford to go with rims as light as 300g per hoop easily without fear. The wheels you linked to are pretty light(the weak point as far as weight goes here lies in the hubs, shimano hubs are heavy but reliable). At that price though it seems like a no brainer to me, sweet deal.

    For actual training though, I'd actually go with heavy wheels, so that when you hop on your bike with the lighter wheels, you feel like it zips along!

  3. #3
    don't move for trees
    Reputation: BKnight's Avatar
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    I would suggest with staying with you're heavier wheels, builds more muscle and endurance.
    "Get a bicycle.You will not regret it if you live." Mark Twain

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the input - good point with regard to training. I do use my MTB as my road bike, too, however. No room or thought of another bike at this point.

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