1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Let's beat a dead horse.

    I'm new to MTB (race Mx all the time) and looking for a better transition to clipless pedals. I currently have some cheap crank bros. and I'm not too comfy uncliping in technical stuff. Is there some other brand that is easier for beginners?

  2. #2
    I post too much.
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    One that is recommended a lot are shimano's 520's.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    One that is recommended a lot are shimano's 520's.
    +1. I'm riding 540s now, which are very similar to the 520s. I have no experience with Crank Brother's pedals (aside from the 5050s on my FR bike) so I can't compare the shimanos to the CBs. To aid in learning clipless pedals, I would spend a lot of time just riding (nothing too technical) and clipping in/unclipping a lot. You have to get to the point that you unclip without thinking about it. If you have to take even a fraction of a second to think about unclipping, that can be the difference between getting a foot down in time and tumbling off the bike.

  4. #4
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalChilio
    I'm not too comfy uncliping in technical stuff.
    Then you're in terrrain that's over your head for your ability level. Go practise in the park.
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

  5. #5
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    Just get used to what you have. Buying new pedals would be a waste and won't make a significant difference.
    [SIZE=1]"The mouth of justice contemplates wisdom."[/SIZE]

  6. #6
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    I'd say some Shimano 520's. They work great even when you get used to them and start riding normally on them. Just get the tension settings right the way you like them. Also like its been said before, just practice on some flat grass and stuff first. Then work your way up to what you are used to doing.



    ps. you will fall over at least once

  7. #7
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    stay clipped in on the tech stuff
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    If you live long enough, you'll discover that most people are dull, boring and lazy..

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  8. #8
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    Hey, fellow mx racer here. Yeah, stay clipped in all the time like fullcircle said. I've used Crank Brothers Egg Beater C's and Mallet C's. They're both great, and very easy to clip out of. Once in awhile I'll forget I am clipped and come to a stop, but can easily clip out while I'm starting to tip over. I've heard the cheap crank brothers Smarty's are poorly made compared to the rest of them and should be avoided. Check out the pedal reviews on here. If you haven't seen the review section there's a link at the top of the page. Doesn't it feel weird not being able to put your inside leg out around corners?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by djp2k8
    Hey, fellow mx racer here. Yeah, stay clipped in all the time like fullcircle said. I've used Crank Brothers Egg Beater C's and Mallet C's. Doesn't it feel weird not being able to put your inside leg out around corners?

    My Crank Bros take a lot of effort to get out of, maybe I have a problem with them.

    I feels really weird not being to put your leg out for balance, and what I miss most is the throttle.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalChilio
    My Crank Bros take a lot of effort to get out of, maybe I have a problem with them.

    I feels really weird not being to put your leg out for balance, and what I miss most is the throttle.
    Change to Gripshift. j/k. Which pedals do you have? Check to see if your shoe tread is getting caught on the pedal. If so you can put shims under the cleats. I had to do this with the Mallets. Some people shave the tread down with a razor or dremel.

  11. #11
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    I just picked up some 520's yesterday and installed them. Just fooling around in the basement on the bike, they are very easy to clip in and out. It should only take me a few rides to become 100% comfortable with them.

  12. #12
    Bikecurious
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    I'm currently riding Time ATAC Z's and I love em. Nice big platforms, easy clip-in mechanism, tough as hell. Problem is they have slowed my adjustment to riding clipless because they allow me to ride unclipped. I find I usually ride with one foot clipped in and one unclipped. I briefly rode with the cheap Wellgos that came with my bike, but switched over to the Times because I wanted to be able to ride my bike to class without having to wear my mtb shoes. So my suggestion is ride what you've got, get used to them, fall a few times, etc, then decide if you need something different. I do recomend these pedals though if you ride a lot of uber-sketchy stuff. Its nice to have the option to ride unclipped, but riding clipped in is so much more efficient and gives much more control once you get over the confidence thing.

  13. #13
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    do you maybe have the cleats on the wrong feet? experts chime in, i know there is a way to manipulate the float with cleat position (left shoe vs. right shoe), but would that also effect the release when trying to get out?

    Oh, and I don't use my eggbeaters because I made a mistake and bought terrible shoes, but you should be twisting hte heel of your foot "in" and not out.. makes for easier release.

  14. #14
    responsible zombie owner
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    CB pedals are great - once the cleats wear in. until then practise on tarmac or easy trails until the action is butter-smooth both clipping in and out.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Bob
    Just get used to what you have. Buying new pedals would be a waste and won't make a significant difference.
    Having ridden both SPDs and Crank Brothers, that is my advice as well. It just takes time and practice regardless of what pedal you are using.

  16. #16
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    adjust the release tension. at least on SPD's, there is quite a range.

  17. #17
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    If you do want to change pedals, I can whole heartedly recommend Speedplay Frogs. I have no problem clipping in and there is no thought at all with clipping out; no special moves, no twisting or turning, it seems like I just lift out. I'm very used to Speedplay; I used them on the road for almost ten years before getting a mountain bike so I've have no problems at all. Now my wife was using the Crank Bros pedals that came with her bike for a year and a half until two weeks ago when she mentioned that she couldn't clip out as easily as I can. I ordered her a set of Frogs. She tried them this morning and right of the bat, after a couple try's in front of the house, she said they were way better

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalChilio
    I'm new to MTB (race Mx all the time) and looking for a better transition to clipless pedals. I currently have some cheap crank bros. and I'm not too comfy uncliping in technical stuff. Is there some other brand that is easier for beginners?
    I might recomend to look also at Shiman 647. They have the same mechanism as the 620-640 but have a nice cage in case you don't want to clip in.

  19. #19
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    This is called a learning curve. Learning to clip and unclip at a moments notice takes practice. Just keep pedaling and practicing.

  20. #20
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    Practice practice practice....clip in clip out clip in clip out...fall a couple times.
    And at the same time you might want to try the Shimano M324 pedals.
    Clip on one side...platform on the other. An easier alternative to the M647.
    And a good pedal to practice with.

  21. #21
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Here's another vote for Time Atac pedals. Extemely easy to clip in, and out (when needed). Give them a try.

  22. #22
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    Here's my experience with clipless pedals. Started with some economy Rockwerkes (same as Wellgos) and after a few comic falls, got along well with them. I kept hearing how good Time ATACS are so I ordered a pair from Speedgoat with the shaved cleats. I practiced with them a little, then got cross-rutted on a ride, couldn't clip out, and fractured my right tibia. My fault, I should have practiced more.

    Healed up, then found that I had a mental block when hitting anything technical with the Times because of my previous fall. I saw some Shimano 536s on sale at Price Point and purchased them. I get along better with them because I can adjust the release tension and can also use the multi-release cleat. I think the adjustable tension is a great feature for beginners. I personally haven't had any mud problems with the 536s but I don't ride when the trails are really muddy, don't like to rut them up. I hear the newer Shimano pedals are even better in the mud.

    That's my .02, YMMV.

    Smokey

  23. #23
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    I've been riding clipless for years and I totally recommend the 520s or 540s (I like the 540s better). With the 540s I just click them out to minimum tension, and make sure to lubricate the cleat-holder with chain lube before every ride. They are instant-out.
    All problems in mountain biking can be solved by going faster, except the ones that are caused by going too fast.

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