1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    24

    Knee pain and foot position on platform pedals

    I've read a lot of the other knee pain threads on here but am not sure any of them address this specific question. I've been getting pain in one knee near the end of long rides, details below:

    - long seated climbs only (even in spinning in very low gear)
    - left knee only (just above kneecap... run your finger down your thigh until you feel bone, just about there)

    I've tried multiple seatpost adjustments and am pretty sure it's not that, but I could be wrong. Anyway, here is the weird thing I noticed. Normally I put my feet on my platforms so that the pedal is at the ball of my feet. I am pretty symmetric with both feet. A lot of the advice on here about knee pain involves moving your cleat... which is obviously out for me, so I tried something else out of curiosity... I moved my foot on the pedal. Put my left heel over the platform and pedaled that way... and the pain vanished. But it feels VERY awkward to pedal like that, and introduces a new sort of "overstretch" pain to my hamstring.

    Any ideas or insight? Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,062
    Not sure, but it could be the twist of the foot. I ride clipless on my bike and never have had any knee issues. However I also ride the stationay bike at my gym when i don't have time for a proper ride (mostly mid week). Last ride for the first time my right knee was hurting a little in a similar spot. The gym bike uses platforms of course and I try to match my clipless position. Still I found it odd. I was doing 45 mintues of hard pace like long hard climb. Away the pain was gone in 30 mintues or so, but I chaulk it up how my foot was sitting on the pedal. Never ever happend before and when I got back on my bike this Saturday I felt fine. Zero pain. Not sure if this helps, but maybe if get your foot positioned wrong this can happen. At least for me with clipless I have dialed in my foot position and angle it is always the same.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  3. #3
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    4,980
    Knee pain isn't something the internet can solve for you, you really should be discussing this with someone trained in these sorts of issues. A good bikefitter would be my first choice, or a physio or something.

    In my experience, knee pain comes from excess movement of the knee joint. Personally, my feet pronate which means that the foot rolls inward when I put weight on my foot. So when I take a step (or a pedal stroke to some extent) my knee both bends and extends while it rolls around in a circle parallel to the ground. This causes excess stress in the joint and leads to knee pain. A solution for me is fairly easy, footbeds. My ski boots house an enormously expensive set of footbeds while I've sort of cheaped out on my cycling shoes with a pair of effective but not perfect Superfeet insoles.

    Initially, I went with clipless pedals to aleviate my knee pain but when I actually got down to it it wasn't the float that was helping control my knee pain, it was the proper shoes with better insoles. Now I'm back on flat pedals (5.10 Impact 2) and free from knee pain because I've begun to support my feet to keep them from rolling and causing knee movement.

    For a short time I used to fit ski boots part time and teach skiing full time and someone much smarter than I told me that you can't correct an issue if the base you stand on isn't solid. You may have deeper kinesthetic issues, but until you start stabilizing your contact points you won't know for sure.

    Again, I'm no expert and I still advise that you go see one.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sickmak90's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    678
    I get left knee pain from time to time as well. Honestly, I have a minuscule tear so I just write it off as a normal pain. I'll live with it until I get surgery.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Knee pain isn't something the internet can solve for you, you really should be discussing this with someone trained in these sorts of issues. A good bikefitter would be my first choice, or a physio or something.

    In my experience, knee pain comes from excess movement of the knee joint. Personally, my feet pronate which means that the foot rolls inward when I put weight on my foot. So when I take a step (or a pedal stroke to some extent) my knee both bends and extends while it rolls around in a circle parallel to the ground. This causes excess stress in the joint and leads to knee pain. A solution for me is fairly easy, footbeds. My ski boots house an enormously expensive set of footbeds while I've sort of cheaped out on my cycling shoes with a pair of effective but not perfect Superfeet insoles.

    Initially, I went with clipless pedals to aleviate my knee pain but when I actually got down to it it wasn't the float that was helping control my knee pain, it was the proper shoes with better insoles. Now I'm back on flat pedals (5.10 Impact 2) and free from knee pain because I've begun to support my feet to keep them from rolling and causing knee movement.

    For a short time I used to fit ski boots part time and teach skiing full time and someone much smarter than I told me that you can't correct an issue if the base you stand on isn't solid. You may have deeper kinesthetic issues, but until you start stabilizing your contact points you won't know for sure.

    Again, I'm no expert and I still advise that you go see one.
    Thanks, what you say makes sense of course, and I actually am seeing a sports doctor in a few weeks for something different, so I will bring this up. But I figured it couldn't hurt to ask on here and see what anecdotal evidence I get. If I get an idea on here that makes the pain go away... good enough for me no matter who it came from. ;-)

    By... dig the Mr. Sparkle quote in your sig! Awesome power!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,783
    I had bad knee pain when i first started mountain biking. two things made the pain vanish and never come back: four sessions with an athletic physical therapist and switching to clipless pedals.

    I was riding a single-speed bike with flat pedals and flimsy sneakers. this allowed my sticky sneaker to wander all over the spikey pedal and I was pedaling with my knees out. this was the most efficient way for me to pedal because it favored some leg muscles that were more developed than others. working on my hamstring flexibility and forcing myself to pedal properly by clipping in has kept that kind of pain at bay for years.

    i don't want to start another "clipless vs platforms" debate, but this was my experience. if you want to ride flat pedals, get some big, grippy ones and some stiff, sticky shoes. riding in tiny plastic pedals and Vans slip-ons or trail running shoes is not going to cut it, and you'll probably injure yourself.

  7. #7
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    4,980
    Quote Originally Posted by The111 View Post
    Thanks, what you say makes sense of course, and I actually am seeing a sports doctor in a few weeks for something different, so I will bring this up. But I figured it couldn't hurt to ask on here and see what anecdotal evidence I get. If I get an idea on here that makes the pain go away... good enough for me no matter who it came from. ;-)

    By... dig the Mr. Sparkle quote in your sig! Awesome power!
    Ha, first person to recognize the quote!

    Knee pain is a funny thing, I've wrestled with it in one way or another for many many years and recently I've found that I have mostly gotten rid of it. Couldn't tell you how, I suspect it's a combination of many things, but seeing a sports doctor is a great first step.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6
    I was having left knee pain after getting a used bike with clipless pedals. I discovered that my left foot angles inward slightly and adjusted that cleat accordingly. It hasn't bothered me since.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I897 using Tapatalk 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •