1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Kinda dumb question... Can I use a 27.5" fork on a 26" frame

    Well I can get a 27.5 reba RLT 2013 for $300. All the 26" forks Reba are $400.
    Any drawback of doing this? Not set on it but don't think I can get a better fork for the $$$

  2. #2
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    Brakes might not line up. The travel is probably different than a 26. I am not an expert but these thoughts popped up.
    The bike doesn't make you go fast.
    You make the bike go fast.

  3. #3
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    Axle to crown will be off can and probably will screw with ur geometry a bit. Other than that itll bolt right up as long as ur not trying to be old school with v brakes (y brakes wouldn't line up).

    But make sure everything else is actually compatible with ur frame. And ur good to go.
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  4. #4
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    It's gonna alter the geo, I would say for an xc going above 120 gets weird. So if it's a 100mm you should be ok.. But the biggest issue I see running a 26" wheel is tire rub because it expands at the tire to accommodate it. If you put the tire at the point where the fork contracts, depending on your tire width you'd have an issue there for sure.

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  5. #5
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    Hmmm mixed replies
    It is 100mm same as that is on it.
    It's a orbea dakr. Brakes are bb5's

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I don't see a mechanical problem.

    IIRC, the bead seat diameter of a 26" wheel is 559 mm, and it's 584 mm for 650B. (27.5 my ass.) So you're looking at raising your A-C about 13 mm. People report that's enough to notice. I don't think it will be detrimental or anything, more "subtle but it's there." I think you'll have a little less clearance to the sides of your tire, but if you can install it without deflating it or rubbing on your fork lowers, it'll probably be fine.

    It's your money, so double-check me before you enter your credit card number.

    Brakes will be fine. That's one of the nice things about disc. You can do really wacky stuff, if you want to, like tiny wheels or 700C in a 26" mountain frame. :-)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Thanks as always Switch!
    I'm torn...
    Seems hard to find a pretty good fork for 1 1/8" straight steer, 26", 9mm. Figure the 26" forks would be cheaper.
    Epicon is $200 (black market), but it quite a bit heavier than the Reba.
    Can find the Rockshox gold TK for $270 all day... But the reba sounds like a much better fork.

    Open to other suggestions. But $300 out the door for a 2013 Reba RLT seems gooooood.

  8. #8
    rebmem rbtm
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    Maybe this is worth looking at: http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-2014-Man.../330941984138?

    It's a OEM fork that's very similar to the 2012/2013 Minute Expert fork, the Minute Experts had 'Trail' tuned ABS+, this fork has a 'XC' tuned ABS+.
    Depending on your weight you might need a different 'Ride Kit' (spring) for it.

  9. #9
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    what makes anyone think that Rockshox would manufacture a 27.5" fork with canti mounts? what decade are we living in? I hate to be that guy, but why would clearance for your canti brakes even be a consideration?

    helpful info- Rockshox forks usually have adjustable travel that you can achieve by putting a spacer in the fork. it's a pain and you have to disassemble the fork to do this, but it will likely get the job done and drop the fork travel by 20mm or whatever you need. the arch above the tire will be a little excessively tall but it could work.

    adjusting the travel does not really do what you need, but it could make it manageable. playing with the spring settings could get you there too. However, all of those options are a kludge at best. I think spending a little more for a fork that actually fits your bike is a superior option. saving pennies by purchasing a fork that was not designed for your bike is not going to be worth it.

  10. #10
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    I dunno i love the epicon. Esp for the money. The Reba is 18 grams lighter btw.

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  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    How long do you plan to ride this bike?

    I bought my new one with the expectation that I'd ride it for at least five years. Historically, I keep bikes I don't break for longer than that. But they often end up in a different role than what I bought them for.

    I had to take a deep breath when I paid the balance on my new bike. It's a lot of money for me. But I reminded myself I'm amortizing it over five years. More, maybe, but I can't predict the future.

    So if what you really want is this year's 26" Reba, which is what, about a $400 fork, don't think in terms of $200 vs $400 today. Think $40/year vs $80/year. Or divide by however long you're keeping this bike.

    If you're already thinking about your next bike, stop thinking about forks now. Do not pass "go." Do not spend $200. :-) Just get the new bike. You only live once. The best way not to waste money is not to open your wallet at all for things that you don't really want.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    How long do you plan to ride this bike?

    I bought my new one with the expectation that I'd ride it for at least five years. Historically, I keep bikes I don't break for longer than that. But they often end up in a different role than what I bought them for.

    I had to take a deep breath when I paid the balance on my new bike. It's a lot of money for me. But I reminded myself I'm amortizing it over five years. More, maybe, but I can't predict the future.

    So if what you really want is this year's 26" Reba, which is what, about a $400 fork, don't think in terms of $200 vs $400 today. Think $40/year vs $80/year. Or divide by however long you're keeping this bike.

    If you're already thinking about your next bike, stop thinking about forks now. Do not pass "go." Do not spend $200. :-) Just get the new bike. You only live once. The best way not to waste money is not to open your wallet at all for things that you don't really want.
    Thanks again fellas
    Refer to my other thread where I'm torn on the bike and what to do with it.
    Winter is coming but we get some pretty warm days in southern Colorado.
    Not sure how long I'll keep it... If the fork makes a huge difference then I'd keep it a few years. I have no complaints about the bike minus it being 30ish lbs.
    But as stated in my other thread. Selling this one and spending $800 in the spring would be the other option.
    I did find one of these local for $500 never ridden.
    Novara Ponderosa 29er Bike - 2014 at REI.com

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Given what you're prepared to spend, it sounds like you're better off keeping your current bike and putting a better fork on it. That Ponderosa doesn't look like much of an upgrade.

    Just because you got a good price for your Dakar doesn't mean that it's not a good bike, especially once you stick a "real" fork on the front. People often undervalue things they got at a good price. So I think it's helpful to keep in mind what the original MSRP was on a used bike and also look at what the previous owner put on it - "real," long-term wheels, a couple choice drivetrain bits, name-brand brake calipers.

    I don't know what you make or what you owe, but you need to be careful with doing piecemeal upgrades like this. Today it's the fork, next it'll be the brakes, and in not too long if you didn't buy like you mean it, you'll be doing the fork again. Or, you'll replace a bunch of big ticket stuff and then decide to buy a $3000 bike. Or something. Try to have a clear idea of what it is you want from your bike. For me, that's been pretty helpful in making decisions. For example, after I demoed my first 29er, I stopped upgrading my old bike. It took a few more years before I was in a position to start over with a new bike, but I didn't blow a bunch of money on, say, a nice carbon 26" hardtail frame in the interim.

    Basically, make a decision. Then, really commit to it. If you want a nice fork, do it like you mean it. If you want a cheap fork, you can get something for $80 (retail) that's better than what's on there now.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    Reading this I didn't even happen to think when I posted before.

    Dont limit yourself to rockshox because ur seriously closing off equal/better options for same or less money.

    Manitou 26" forks can be had all day long for under $300. Marvel expert and pro versions I see for 250 and $300ish all the time. Fork internals are as good (arguably abs+ damper is superior to rebas damper, ) or better, forks are stiffer than rockshox. And cost way less.

    Look around these boards open ur mind to more options not just rockshox. Ull see what you've been missing and how far ur dollar can really go.

    All that said, make sure u plan to keep the bike if your going to upgrade. And if your going to upgrade to buy the same grade bike from a different company, UPGRADE. You spent say $700 for ur bike (example) next bike save to spend $1700. Buying a new bike that is barely better stock than what u have is the same as using your money as fire kindling.
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  15. #15
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    Good points Switch and tig
    So I'll be keeping it and doing a upgrade or two.
    Not as much press about the Manitou forks... Seems the R7 would be good for me?
    Expert seems heavier, as of now I won't be beating on this fork.

    Just didn't want to put $$ into a crappy frame or geometry.
    Luckily the bike has quite a few upgrades from the previous owner and hardly ridden. Also paid $250 for the bike.

    Thanks again

  16. #16
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    I wore out my R7. Got nowhere trying to get it rebuilt locally; when I sent it to QBP, they said they could send it back for $20 or throw it out for free.

    This was a 2006 model and I did get a few seasons out of it. But I also got it on EBay for $75. I never got it all the way open myself. Suspension work is a higher level of home shop and shopping for obscure items than I get into. Ironically, now that there's a shop near me that does a lot more suspension work locally, I can get oil and probably seals very easily too. But some R7 models didn't have replaceable bushings.

    If you get one cheap, maybe it doesn't matter. Run it into the ground, replace, move on. But for me, being common is a real selling point for a suspension fork. Everybody that does any suspension work at all can handle Fox and RockShox.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  17. #17
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    I have a 29 reba on 26 bike. Works great. Geometry is off a tiny bit but still OK. You ca always reduce travel by 10 or 20mm to preserve geometry.

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