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  1. #1
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    Just moved to Denver... any advice?

    Hi guys! So I just moved out to Denver from Austin after being physically inactive for 6 months due to an ACL injury. Needless to say I expected the butt kicking I'm currently getting from the front range climbs.
    I'm a small guy at 5'8" 138 riding a 2013 trek 3500. So despite my small size the climbs are quite grueling. But I feel like I'm picking up the downhill side pretty quickly. I feel confident in my ability to really lean the bike on tight turns and bunny hop or wheelie most objects or drops.
    So while I love downhilling, the climbs are killing me. Other than keep practicing and getting in better shape, anything you guys can suggest to a newer but rather ambitious younger rider?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Assuming you haven't changed the gearing, my guess is the problem climbing is the poor chainring setup on that bike. Having 48/38/28 up front and 14-34 in back is less than ideal. Trek's trail bike, Remedy, comes with a 36/22 chainring and 11-36 cassette. That is a better setup for trail riding compared to your current bike. Since your smallest chainring is 28 you will find going uphill a lot harder than if you had a 22. That said its still doable on that granny gear but you'll be working.

  3. #3
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    Ride that thing over to Cannonball Creek for a good beer! They have food trucks there most weekends, too.

  4. #4
    RTM
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    I think you just need time to acclimate. And speaking from experience, it'll take about a year for that knee to be back to full strength & confidence, then you build on it from there. The good news is, after rehabbing & riding in CO you will be a monster compared to your old buddies back in Austin.
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by voghan View Post
    Assuming you haven't changed the gearing, my guess is the problem climbing is the poor chainring setup on that bike. Having 48/38/28 up front and 14-34 in back is less than ideal. Trek's trail bike, Remedy, comes with a 36/22 chainring and 11-36 cassette. That is a better setup for trail riding compared to your current bike. Since your smallest chainring is 28 you will find going uphill a lot harder than if you had a 22. That said its still doable on that granny gear but you'll be working.
    Seriously?!? You're suggesting a bike that starts at $2800 as a solution to someone who's still recooping an injury as a real solution?

    Jdouth, you're getting the butt kicking exactly because you've been inactive, the climbs are harder/longer, and the air is thinner at altitude. RTM pretty much nailed it. Once your body is back in business, then if you're looking to tackle some of the more serious terrain and your wallet can afford it, pop back in and there are tons of people who can help you make a good choice. (check your local CO forum for better specific suggestions). Happy riding!

  6. #6
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    ^ I think maybe he was just talking about the gearing? I know nothing about the OP's bike but if voghan is right and he has 28/34 for a low gear then a gear change might be something to think about. It won't make the climbs easy but it may be easier on the knee.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Seriously?!? You're suggesting a bike that starts at $2800 as a solution to someone who's still recooping an injury as a real solution?

    Jdouth, you're getting the butt kicking exactly because you've been inactive, the climbs are harder/longer, and the air is thinner at altitude. RTM pretty much nailed it. Once your body is back in business, then if you're looking to tackle some of the more serious terrain and your wallet can afford it, pop back in and there are tons of people who can help you make a good choice. (check your local CO forum for better specific suggestions). Happy riding!
    I was just comparing two bikes gearing so chill out dude. Maybe you should relax and read the whole post. That bike will be hard to climb on because the gear ratios aren't best for climbs.

  8. #8
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    find more climbs and stay on them

    downhills only get in the way of more climbing

    it will sort itself out if you stick to the plan

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    ^ I think maybe he was just talking about the gearing? I know nothing about the OP's bike but if voghan is right and he has 28/34 for a low gear then a gear change might be something to think about. It won't make the climbs easy but it may be easier on the knee.
    It would seem so. He got all upset or something. Whatever, throwing in the useless bit about a Remedy made it confusing. If he'd left that out it would have made more sense (to me, at least). After reading it for the 4th time I got it. Maybe I need more sleep...

    Yes, definitely spinning easier gears at a higher cadence will be easier on the knee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jdouth View Post
    [FONT=verdana]Other than keep practicing and getting in better shape, anything you guys can suggest to a newer but rather ambitious younger rider?
    Thanks!
    One other thing I forgot to mention - if you've got a knee injury it's all the more important to make sure your saddle height is where it needs to be. Too high or low are both bad for the knees, especially if you don't have the easy gears.

  10. #10
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    I just moved to north Denver metro myself. Only been on one ride over at Marshall Mesa in Boulder. Climbs killed me, I've been jogging to try and get acclimated to the altitude and heat since I can't always drive to the trails.
    *Not a real mountain biker

  11. #11
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    OP stated "physically inactive for 6 months due to an ACL injury". what do you expect?

    i.e. he's out of shape. irrespective of what bike he uses and what gear ratios, he will be having a difficult time. same with running i'm sure or any other cardio activities. i'm recovering from a shoulder injury. you need to take it easy and respect your rest time. i was advised to not ride every day by doctor and an ultra runner advised me to respect rest time as well.

    try climbing on lower graded fire roads first and gradually increase distances. hit the gym on off days to do squats and other lifting. try to cross train as much as possible. good luck.

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