1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
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    Just did my first endo....

    ...as in 'end over end over the bars'. Wasn't even on a downhill technical. Nooooo. Right on a city street, in front of everyone. Wasn't paying attention to where my fingers were. They were lightly gripping my front brake lever. Hit a pothole, reflexively gripped, you can guess what happened next. Sad part was, as I started the launch, I knew what I was doin' wrong, but I could NOT let GO of that brake lever by then. LOL...wotta putz! Nothing but skinned knees, sprained left wrist, and embarrassment. Oh...and the area around my tibia blew up to the size of a grapefruit.Coulda been a lot worse. Take home point: DONT ride with your fingers on the levers unless you need them there at that moment. And wear gloves, wear gloves! This is now the 3rd time I've hit pavement on my hands, and they saved 'em from being seriously shredded, all 3 times.
    Last edited by Doggity; 07-31-2008 at 05:41 PM.

  2. #2
    I reckon y'all fixin to..
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    Could've been worse.

    Look at it this way though... if there wouldn't have been anyone around, you probably would've broken your neck. Save embarrassment for less of an injury.
    "Good health is the slowest possible way one can die."

  3. #3
    Alien Surf Team
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    Congrats on that. If you're gonna do something then do it right. Good job.

  4. #4
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    Ive never endoed
    Buy My 2010 Mint COndition Transition Covert LARGE 150mm Full suspension. 2000 firm see classified add

  5. #5
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    Yep, I done hit the pavement myself before - it sucks way worse than on the mountain, I actually did nerve damage in my back (not a disabling injury, but still feels hot or numb sometimes, and that crash was years ago ). Anyway, I actually pay more attention now when riding on the streets than when on the mountain, due to my crash. It's easy to get lulled into a trance on the streets cause your expecting a smooth predictable ride, then 'BLAMO!', a hazard, and your sleeping brain reacts slowly or incorrectly, and your speed on the streets can be significantly higher than on the mountain. Anyway, glad your okay, just stay on the mountain (its safer).

  6. #6
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    your first endo, and most likely not your last. good jorb.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain biker 41
    Ive never endoed
    your not trying hard enough.

  8. #8
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    I came close yesterday. Just about face-planted at the busiest intersection in town. Was headed to the hardware store on the corner, rode up the easily slanted curb, stood on the pedals, and hit the front brake just as my tire was hitting the sloped curb. Don't know what in blazes I was thinking when I did all that, because I do know better. Just wasn't thinking, I guess. Fortunately, I recovered and avoided an embarrassing crash.

  9. #9
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    I did a few (so far my record is three in one day ) but then again I'm not afraid to try anything. and I'm pretty new also I guess thats a bad combination. but they seem to be easier and eaiser the more you do. But i never face planted yet they all seem to let me land on the right shoulder. and also i do mostly mountain so the landings all seem soft too. only had one on cement (try to go up stairs) and the worst part of that was the wife seen and trying to convince her it looks worse than it really feels. After seeing her face I though she never let me go out on solo rides again fearing I wouldn't be able to dial 911 and no one there to dial it either.

  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    I've done a few this summer, on trails. Mainly in soo innocent looking places:
    - flat ground, a fist size birch stump on the inside of a turn... ouch.
    - flat groud, a bit of speed, over some small roots... except one piece of root was tall enough to catch a pedal... ouch
    - going up a hill, singlespeed... there must have been a root tall enough there, to catch a pedal... ouch.

  11. #11
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    Congrats.. wish I could have been spectating this one.

  12. #12
    Alien Surf Team
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    Here's another point: Learn how to crash, or a better way of saying it, learn how to bail off. The first time I heard somebody tell me that when I was a kid I thought, "What? You just crash and what happens just happens. You don't have any control over it." Sometimes that is true and you just crash, but often you can make the result "less bad".

    Now how do you learn to crash. I have no idea. Just practice crashing a lot. hahaha

  13. #13
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    After getting buying a new bike and getting back in after a few years out I went over the bars less then a hundred yards into my first singletrack ride.

    Hit a hidden stump and found myself laying in the dirt looking up and wondering what ever possessed me to get another bike.

  14. #14
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    Shizzle happens...
    The funny part is when you look around you to see who saw you eat it rather than check yourself and make sure everythings intact xD

    reverse endos are the worst....when you cant crest that incline and you jam on both breaks and find out that your falling backwards into a ditch.....thats gotten to me a couple times with me falling off a ladder bridge one time xD


    now i can say that im not afraid of that bridge anymore
    Lean back, Hit both brakes, And ask yourself, Do you feel lucky today?

  15. #15
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    Dude, it's a rite of passage! LOL
    Last edited by HardRockCop; 08-03-2008 at 03:00 AM.

  16. #16
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    hehe doing a very rutted DH (clay pits) back in '00 or so i managed to hit a pretty tall mound... was supposed to go around it but rut cought me and took me right to it... i did an awesome superman impression right over the bars and landed 10-15' away... bike did a nice little flip type thing also ... bad thing was it cracked the head tube of my bike ... still miss that bike...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  17. #17
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    Well, it happens. Combination of good (that is, strong relatively) brakes and good (that is, soft) front suspension may prove dangerous in the very beginning. You pull the brake levers and, all of sudden, the front shock compresses, making your flight over the bars very easy and natural. You will need to learn, how to get ready for braking - by moving your weight back, it takes just fraction of second. And also learn, how to apply just enough force to the brakes.
    The endo of my life happened without even braking though - very long ago, of course. I was carrying 5 bottles of wine for our party in the forest. Just holding a nylon sack with the bottles inside under my arm. We all were drunk enough by then, so driving for fresh supply was not an option. At a very fast descent on the road I suddenly saw the asphalt strangely close to my eyes.........and that was it.........Next I remember, is me lying on the road face down, in the crushed frog pose.........bleeding all over.....almost skinned........with the bottles intact!
    As it became clear, the fender went loose and fell onto the front wheel at full speed - with quite nasty consequences...........Old man's memories..........

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by xenon
    Well, it happens. Combination of good (that is, strong relatively) brakes and good (that is, soft) front suspension may prove dangerous in the very beginning. You pull the brake levers and, all of sudden, the front shock compresses, making your flight over the bars very easy and natural. You will need to learn, how to get ready for braking - by moving your weight back, it takes just fraction of second. And also learn, how to apply just enough force to the brakes.
    The endo of my life happened without even braking though - very long ago, of course. I was carrying 5 bottles of wine for our party in the forest. Just holding a nylon sack with the bottles inside under my arm. We all were drunk enough by then, so driving for fresh supply was not an option. At a very fast descent on the road I suddenly saw the asphalt strangely close to my eyes.........and that was it.........Next I remember, is me lying on the road face down, in the crushed frog pose.........bleeding all over.....almost skinned........with the bottles intact!
    As it became clear, the fender went loose and fell onto the front wheel at full speed - with quite nasty consequences...........Old man's memories..........
    Mine involved a packed dirt ramp that turned out to be loose sand! LOL Hit that badboy at full speed expecting to grab some mad air...I caught air alright...just without my bike as it got buried in the sand.

  19. #19
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    Most rides I have no endo's. Some rides I have 2 or 3. Someone mentioned you should learn how to fall. This is SO important. I don't worry much about endo's anymore; I mostly land on my feet. If not, I can at least break my fall with a foot or two before I go down. BTW, I don't use clipless pedals.

    To practice falling: Find a nice big log with no sharp sticks or rocks on the other side. Try riding over it at all different angles and in all different body positions. It's actually great practice. But eventually, you'll go over the bars. If not, try a bigger log. Before you know it, you'll naturally be swinging a leg over the bars and landing on your foot. I must have done hundreds of these endo's over my 16 years of riding, with no serious injuries. (knock on head).

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