1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Just bought a DB Outlook, any upgrade ideas?

    I just purchased a 2011 Diamondback Oulook for $125. I am the kind of person that can't leave anything stock. So, anyone got any suggestions what I should replace or could be upgraded?

  2. #2
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    Everything

  3. #3
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    Nothing! Ride it until something wears out or breaks. Save your money until then and decide at that point what you'd like to invest in (parts, new bike, running shoes, etc.).
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  4. #4
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    ^^^ Thanks for the suggestion.



    Quote Originally Posted by xx Hedgehog xx View Post
    Everything
    Thank you so much for being so helpful. I really do appreciate it, maybe you can send some more of your helpful suggestions to Congress and change the world!!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zombie_AZ View Post
    I just purchased a 2011 Diamondback Oulook for $125. I am the kind of person that can't leave anything stock. So, anyone got any suggestions what I should replace or could be upgraded?
    The guy who said everything was being serious. Forks, seats, seat-post, handlebars, drivetrain, grips, wheels can all be upgraded. Heck even the QR skewers can be upgraded.

    What are you planning to do with the bike? Gnarly roots and rock trails? Downhill gravity riding? Paved/gravel riding?
    Last edited by joshhan; 12-16-2011 at 07:42 AM.
    Bikes, lots'o bikes

  6. #6
    Chubby Chaser
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    If you're the type of guy that likes to upgrade everything, you should have bought a decent frame and did a week's worth of research and start ordering parts to build your own bike.

    I second that the guy who said you need to upgrade "everything" was being dead serious.

    There's pretty much no point in you spending any money to upgrade that bike.

  7. #7
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    I'd ride the Outlook until you break it and start buying parts here and there for a new bike. Buy the frame, put the parts you've been collecting on it and you'll probably have a really nice bike for not a ton of money and you wouldn't have had to miss any riding time because you had the Outlook to ride while you shopped.

    The Outlook isn't worth putting a ton of money into, probably just enough to keep it running. If you're insistent on upgrading, the best money you can put into any bike is in the contact points: tires, grips, saddle, and pedals. Things like forks or derailleurs are, as they say, sucker bets on a bike like that. It's a great way to spend a ton of money and get very little return.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^^
    Mostly agree with this. I'd just add that for a lot of people, a more appropriately sized stem can make the bike fit better. And, I might try to do things in a little different order. Start with a frame you'll be happy to ride indefinitely. You don't want to get a beautiful new 80mm race fork and then a year later buy a frame that has a tapered head tube and geometry for a 120mm fork.

    There's an idea of products vs. platforms that I think anyone thinking about upgrading a mountain bike should be aware of - for a while there, there was a decent set of standards on a mountain bike that made it easy to move parts around. That made the frame a platform to build a bike on. Lately, there's a boatload of different standards that either need adapters or are sometimes mutually incompatible or only adaptable in one direction. While you still get a lot of flexibility, it's a lot narrower. I think it's becoming an error in thinking to plan to move to a new frame after buying the parts for it - better to accept that high end frames have a good chunk of their build more-or-less implied, and start with the frame and whatever parts you can't cannibalize from the previous bike. I was thinking about doing the frame swap thing myself this winter, but I demoed some bikes and decided I want a 29er hardtail next. I have a 26" hardtail so I can move my brakes, drivetrain and cockpit over, but not wheels or suspension fork, which are pretty large-ticket items. Instead, I'm going to try to "freeze" my build and buy a complete bike in two years or so.

    Give yourself a season or so to figure out what you love about riding. It's going to influence your choice of what you want your next build to be. In the mean time, you can paint stuff red if you like. Demoing different classes of bike would be useful too, especially if you're building out from a bare frame and won't be able to test ride until you're done. If you break something expensive, cut your losses and get a mid-range bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    Mountain Man Dan
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    The Diamondback Outlook mountain bike for kids gives them confidence when headed out on an off-road adventure. Burly aluminum frame and front suspension fork featuring 50mm of travel combine to create a comfortable ride on rugged terrain
    Yeah I'd say everything.
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  10. #10
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    Sadly I was being dead serious. Based on the component spec I wouldn't say there isn't much that wouldn't be worth upgrading to give you a better ride but the frame isn't the best canvas for a good build either. Didn't mean to offend you though. Then again the others here have a good point of you just riding the bike until it disintegrates and then buy something better instead of wasting a fortune on trick parts that will just be like a band-aid.

    Based on the design and spec I'd really consider the Outlook a hybrid rather than a full on mountain bike but that's just me.

  11. #11
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    My apologies then. I misunderstood what you were saying. Right now I think a hybrid is more what I need, but I will start saving for a more serious mtb.

  12. #12
    Texan
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    I feel sort of uncomfortable and sorry for Zombie_AZ. Don't take it wrong bro, but sometimes we forget where came from and can be a bit snobbish, and short at times. I started out on a Sorrento and was glad it had a kickstand. The other day a guy was ranting about expensive bikes and guys that can't ride.

    Ride the wheels off of it, then get a better bike.

  13. #13
    Titanium junkie
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    ^^^ Nicely done ^^^
    If you ride it and that's what you could afford for right now, then enjoy it
    until something nicer comes along. My opinion is a bike is a bike, if it gets you out
    and puts a smile on your face, who cares what it is.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary H View Post

    Ride the wheels off of it, then get a better bike.
    Perhaps it could have been said less bluntly, but that is exactly what most people are saying. It must be hard to a person who is new to the board, but to the people who have been here a while this is a common post. And every time it comes up, the answer is the same; if your goal is mountain biking then saving for a proper mountain bike, even an entry level one, is the best use of anyone's money in this situation.

    No question that a cheap bike is better than no bike and riding a bike is better than not riding a bike. But when the question is focused toward asking what parts are worth upgrading, the best answer is to avoid spending money on this bike and look a little further down the line. Maybe the OP will find that they want to ride on road more or perhaps they'll find that full on mountain biking is where they want to go; at that point it might make sense to buy an entirely different bike because the current one simply can't be adapted to what they are trying to ride. In that case, no matter how much money is spent upgrading your current bike, it will never turn into a bike that it is not.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  15. #15
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    You can always ride the wheels off the DB while building another ride...

    What type of riding do you want to do? How big are you? Do you want a HT or FS bike? What do you want to spend?

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