1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Jeep vs Trek

  1. #1
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    Jeep vs Trek

    Hi,

    I'm interested in getting a low-end bike, but don't want one that will fall apart. Going with a brand name like Trek seems like a better bet than going with Jeep but when I compare the bikes it seems like I get a lot more for my money with Jeep.

    See the Trek 3500 compared with the Jeep.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...3_series/3500/

    http://www.allthingsjeep.com/cyc41-c...assiceuro.html

    http://www.allthingsjeep.com/cyc41-cherokeesmens.html

    I realize the full suspension on the Jeep is a joke, but with one I get more gears and a disc brake and the other seems to provide me with something similar to the Trek at half the cost.

    Are the parts on Trek's low end model really worth 350?

  2. #2
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    Have you tried your local shops yet? There are many more good quality bikes out there BESIDES Trek.

    Jeep never made bikes. They make cars. I'm pretty sure Pacific makes those bikes for Jeep, same company that makes the Wal-mart bikes (bikes that "fall apart"). Stick with a hardtail for a cheaper bike.

  3. #3
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    SOLD OUT. New models coming in summer 2008.
    WHAAAAT? GOSH DARNIT!!!
    I give positive rep all around but then I get negative rep from all the clowns.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the reply.

    I was considering that Trek bike because it was the cheapest at my local shop compared to the Specialized Hardrock.

    Are the components on Trek's or Specailzed's low end model really worth the extra $150 when compared with cheap bikes that can fall apart? Or would it be a better value for me to wait until I was willing to spend $450-500 to get the most bang for my buck?

  5. #5
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    If "Jeep" bikes are anything like their vehicles then run away.......run so far away! I would stick with Trek! I know Jeep doesn't make them but they have them badged for Jeep and while I love a Jeep Wrangler......the one I had blew up brand new and Jeep did not honor a warranty and rather rebuilt a brand spanking new engine! I told Jeep to kiss my ass and sold the damn thing and went back to Japanese vehicles!

    So my vote is Trek!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc075
    Thanks for the reply.

    I was considering that Trek bike because it was the cheapest at my local shop compared to the Specialized Hardrock.

    Are the components on Trek's or Specailzed's low end model really worth the extra $150 when compared with cheap bikes that can fall apart? Or would it be a better value for me to wait until I was willing to spend $450-500 to get the most bang for my buck?

    Some of the components are similar, but the Trek is going to be at least 10 lbs lighter than a steel framed, bottom of the line 'dual suspension' bike from Jeep. A lot of the components on the Trek are better though, and the quality control standards for Trek's cheapest bike are without a doubt higher than those for Jeep's most expensive bike. Coming from a bike shop, all of the parts will be adjusted well and correctly, and they'll most likely be giving you a free 30 day(break in period) tune up and free minor adjustments for a year or more. Below $700 or so, full suspension is a waste of money, in general. It will be heavy and cheaply put together, which means it really wont ride all that well. Stick with the hardtail from Trek or any other bike shop brand. You'll be better off for it.

  7. #7
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    Looking around the forums I found a link to a 2010 Motobecane 400.

    I have to assemble the Motobecane, but does it provide any advantages/disadvantages compared to the Trek 3500?

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ne_400HT_x.htm

    And I am right to assume that assembling a bike isn't too hard to figure out?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc075
    Looking around the forums I found a link to a 2010 Motobecane 400.

    I have to assemble the Motobecane, but does it provide any advantages/disadvantages compared to the Trek 3500?

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ne_400HT_x.htm

    And I am right to assume that assembling a bike isn't too hard to figure out?

    Assembling is easy if you're careful and patient. Adjusting can be a bit more difficult. If it comes down to it, you could always bring it, fully assembled, to your local bike shop and pay $50 for a tune up to get you going.

  9. #9
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    My brother in law has a jeep bike. I wouldn't spend HIS money on another. Discs warped from the get-go, front derailleir bent, (tin foil I think!), bent the rim on his first and only ride.

    He asked me to take a look and see if I could fix it. Ended up showing them what a bike shop looks like from the inside!
    I'm beginning to overcome my "momentum issues" but even that is happening slowly.

    MTB Name - Crustius Maximus

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc075
    Looking around the forums I found a link to a 2010 Motobecane 400.

    I have to assemble the Motobecane, but does it provide any advantages/disadvantages compared to the Trek 3500?

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ne_400HT_x.htm

    And I am right to assume that assembling a bike isn't too hard to figure out?
    One thing on the motobecane, is that the rear gearing is 12-24, while the Trek is 13-34. Unless the trails where you ride don't have long climbs, might not be a big deal, but if you're a begginer rider and ride on trails with climbs, you will notice that difference. Errr, I looked at the cranks on both, and Trek has larger ones, so the effect might not be as notable... I don't know why they don't build entry level bikes with the right gearing for begginers (or not so begginers).... Specialized Hardrock has a better range, I think.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc075
    And I am right to assume that assembling a bike isn't too hard to figure out?
    If you have no experience build/tuning a bike, it could make the bike feel like trash and you would be wasting your money. When a bike is set-up right, a $400 bike could feel better than a $1000 bike that hasn't been built right.

    I still suggest to you to visit more bike shops to find a bike you like in your budget. Any bike at a shop will be good quality and built right. Good luck.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    .......I don't know why they don't build entry level bikes with the right gearing for begginers (or not so begginers)....

    Because most of the bikes you see below @$600 aren't really intended to be used for serious off roading. The manufacturers assume(and are correct) that the overwhelming majority(but not all) of them will see nothing more than roads and rail/canal trails, where the bigger gearing works fine.

    Most bike shops would be willing to swap out the cranks at time of purchase for a compact set up of similar retail value for a small fee.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mount Dora Cycles
    Have you tried your local shops yet? There are many more good quality bikes out there BESIDES Trek.

    Jeep never made bikes. They make cars. I'm pretty sure Pacific makes those bikes for Jeep, same company that makes the Wal-mart bikes (bikes that "fall apart"). Stick with a hardtail for a cheaper bike.
    just buy the trek... i have it and love it...a lot of people will tell you to buy a used bike or a non trek but trek is a very good company which is family owned and they hold true to their warranty...I reccomend buying the red shield warranty because i have already got my moneys worth in less than a year...

    trek = quality great bike with a great warranty

  14. #14
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    trek just makes frames. the rest of the components are pretty similar to everything in its class.

    you pay a lot for the trek name.. you dont get much value from it though.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    trek just makes frames. the rest of the components are pretty similar to everything in its class.

    you pay a lot for the trek name.. you dont get much value from it though.
    I disagree. All right, components are important, but the FRAME is the most important. You can dress a Huffy with the best components, but it will ride like a Huffy, maybe a tad better, but nothing to write home about. A good frame will last longer and provide a more reliable bike.

    Also, the Jeeps are cheap full suspension bikes, which will likely have a lousy geometry and the rear suspension will likely be a pogo stick on wheels. Maybe not, but really, I doubt they will perform well, while the Trek is a hardtail with a solid frame. It will last longer, and maybe worth a few upgrades later on.

  16. #16
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    In that price range id look on Craigslist for a really good used bike
    Ride

  17. #17
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    Oh, a Jeep will definitely crush a Trek.

    You're talkin' bout 3 tons vs. 30 lbs or so.

    I've run over a Trek before on my Jeep...it's not pretty.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc075
    Hi,

    I'm interested in getting a low-end bike, but don't want one that will fall apart. Going with a brand name like Trek seems like a better bet than going with Jeep but when I compare the bikes it seems like I get a lot more for my money with Jeep.

    See the Trek 3500 compared with the Jeep.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...3_series/3500/

    http://www.allthingsjeep.com/cyc41-c...assiceuro.html

    http://www.allthingsjeep.com/cyc41-cherokeesmens.html

    I realize the full suspension on the Jeep is a joke, but with one I get more gears and a disc brake and the other seems to provide me with something similar to the Trek at half the cost.

    Are the parts on Trek's low end model really worth 350?
    $350 for a low end trek sounds like a good entry level ride to me! No, I don't think you're going to get more for you money with a jeep. I think the trek will serve you better over the long haul. Like other people have said, there are other bikes out there. but if you're narrowing it down to those two, I'd go with the trek.

    More info here:
    Buying Your First Mountain Bike? Here's What You Should and Shouldn't Do
    GregRidesTrails.com--An informational and instructional mountain bike blog.

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