1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Installing new parts, LBS vs DIY.

    OK so I got me a Hardrock Sport, the plan is too not really worry about upgrading parts until the current ones die, but I dont think I can live with the stock forks on this bike. Im 6ft and 210lbs and its just too squishy for me I think

    So the question is can a newb handle changing out a part like this? a local shop will want to charge quite a bit to do this for me and well I can get a better part if I use the installation cash for buyin the forks instead, or get a lesser item and still have money left over to get it put on the bike.

    So what do you think? are some parts just better to be let done by the pros and others not that bad and can be figured out easily enough?

  2. #2
    I bike long tyme.
    Reputation: Secace's Avatar
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    Man, you can tackle that job no prob with some common sense and the huge amount of detailed online instruction all over the web. Or buy the fork from your shop and they'll likely install it for free.
    People wait for me on the way up. I wait for them on the way down.

  3. #3
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    Depending on how much of a 'noob' you are, the fork can be tricky. You might (probably will) need to cut the steerer tube, you've got to deal with the headset, reinstalling the brakes, etc, etc.

    Just how much is the LBS charging?
    :wq

  4. #4
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    What type of fork is it?

    If it is an air fork all you need to do is increase the pressure to remove some of the squishy feeling. Set the sag using the instructions on the following web site. You will need to use a zip tie instead of their o-ring.

    http://www.pushindustries.com/media/...structions.pdf

  5. #5
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    If its a coil/spring fork

    You could look into getting a heavier spring for it also. My wife's fork didn't get much travel because the spring was too heavy for her. The replacement spring cost $22 and all that we had to do was remove one cap, pull out the old spring, grease the new one and drop it in. Much cheaper than buying a new fork.

  6. #6
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    DIY - you only have yourself to blame if something is not done right.

    LBS - you have someone blaming you if something is not done right.

    Invest in a couple of books and buy the tools as needed, unless you come across a sweet deal on a complete set.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longhair
    DIY - you only have yourself to blame if something is not done right.

    LBS - you have someone blaming you if something is not done right.

    Invest in a couple of books and buy the tools as needed, unless you come across a sweet deal on a complete set.
    Wow, that's a cynical view of things. A good LBS would not blame the customer for their error
    :wq

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonicsuby
    Wow, that's a cynical view of things. A good LBS would not blame the customer for their error
    LBS was meant as a generic term.

    As far as being cynical, I own a Harley and every time I took the thing in for warranty work, they would say that I caused the problem until I showed them the service bulletin stating that it was a known issue.

    Everything that was done on the motorcycle by the dealership was done incorrectly - reinstalled defective parts, not replacing a $0.03 fuel line seal, cutting wires and leaving them exposed, etc. - and the HQ in Milwaukee didn't see anything wrong

  9. #9
    ~I Ride In Circles ~
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    Bike aren't rocket science. It amazes me that people are afraid to rebuild a headset or something.. What I mean is that unless you are a completely mechanically retarded you should be able to do many of the jobs on a bike. If you have the tools it's all pretty straight forward. Read around online and in books and you'll come to figure it all out
    [SIZE=3]
    ~ it's all good ~
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