1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Installed a new fork. quick question-SOLVED Thanks-

    I installed a new fork today, it was my first time doing it. It is a Suntour Epicon on an Airborne Skyhawk.
    I got it done but probably rushed a few steps in my excitement. For instance didn't have any pipe to get the crown race on so used some pliers and hammer. Dinged up the finish on steerer tube but got it done. Also the star nut was crooked, but I finally got it straightened out...for the most part.
    This is my first bike and I'm definatly a noob, but fairly mechanical...
    So My noob question is, was I supposed to put cable housing on the remote lockout wire gimmick? I didn't, and have it real tight to get it to work.
    If I was supposed to, it may now be cut too short, can/should I replace the wire and add cable housing?
    What kind of wire and or parts will I need? Gear or Brake? Any other odds or ends?
    Thanks alot for any guidance.
    Last edited by kope007; 04-20-2013 at 10:34 AM.

  2. #2
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    Sorry, I don't follow exactly what you did with the cable installation. But if you need to replace it, I think either brake or shifter cable would work. Or better yet, just strip some of the covering off your damaged cable. If they steel covering is spiral-wound, it is brake, straight it is shift.

    If the lockout control is such that you can reach down and flip it by hand, and you ride mostly XC, I wouldn't worry about the remote feature.

    http://www.amazon.com/SR-Suntour-Epi.../dp/B006ZJ3124

    Cables

  3. #3
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    Most shock remotes have a 1 inch to 1.25 inch allowance (this distance is different depending on your remote lock) so you don't really need to tighten it super tight. If you do it really tight, you might eventually snap the cable when you engage a lockout.

    My rule of thumb is to tension it at around 70-80% from the tightest you can get, that way you can adjust it if it's too tight or tighten it further if it still has slack. Also, the extra allowance will eventually help you when the cable stretches in the future.

    Example: The fork I use now has a different tension compared to my rear shock. Both have remote locks. It depends on range where the shock (either front or rear) will engage a lockout. Different brands = different lock engagement points = Different lengths.

    Unfortunately, I have no experience with an Epicon. But, my DT Swiss has a shorter lock engagement compared to my RockShox.

    I hope this helps. And btw, it doesnt hurt to ask from the shop who sold you the fork.
    Let's Ride!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies.

    To explain a little more clearly, The remote lockout only had bare wire with no casing, and this is how I installed it. If its not real tight, engaging the switch only takes the slack out of the cable rather than pulling the mechanism on the fork. Leading me to think cable housing was in order, the cable would pull inside the housing rather than just tighten up the slack?

    DennisF, that is the model I have that you linked to. If you can see the remote switch only had about 2" of cable housing and the rest is exposed. I'm not too clear on how to tell the diff between brake and gear cable, but I'll read up on the link, and hey here's a bright idea...look at my bike.

    Sixtoes, I ordered it online, and since they don't sell the 9mm version in the US, I think this fell off a truck in Taiwan. So I don't think I'll be getting any support from the seller.

    I think talking it out here has kind of answered my question as far as needing cable housing.

    Thanks a lot.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kope007 View Post
    The remote lockout only had bare wire with no casing, and this is how I installed it. If its not real tight, engaging the switch only takes the slack out of the cable rather than pulling the mechanism on the fork. Leading me to think cable housing was in order, the cable would pull inside the housing rather than just tighten up the slack?
    Oh okay, I just saw the picture now. Sorry didn't look at DennisF link earlier. My reason why I said you shouldn't super tighten it is because the remote locks I have, include wire tension adjuster with locking nuts. I couldn't really look at it properly coz the picture was too small. But in that case, if you dont have a wire tension adjuster then

    1.) Set the proper PSI for the shock
    2.) Put it on the locked position
    3.) Simulate a ridiculously bumpy ride and check if its really locked out (pump handle bars)
    4.) If things are okay then install the remote on your handle bar
    5.) If it doesn't reach then buy a new cable

    As far as cable housing is concerned, it's a must for me. (Well, I live beside the beach so even stainless cables rust that's why housings are important) It also looks more decent and easier to clean.
    Let's Ride!

  6. #6
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    Thanks, a lot.
    Quote from the article Dennis linked to cleared it up for me
    "Isaac Newton said "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." In the case of bicycle cables, this means that there cannot be a pull on an inner cable without an equal push on the housing. The housing gives the pull of the cable something to pull against."

  7. #7
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    Yes you absolutely do need a cable housing Kope. Dont just run a bare wire.

    Cheers

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the replies. Definitely learned something.

    Trip to the LBS and $10 for $.30 worth of cable and housing and I'm good to go.

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