1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    I think it's mental.

    I think it's mental.-imageuploadedbytapatalk1334532140.975998.jpgI think it's mental.-imageuploadedbytapatalk1334532169.352585.jpgHow do i get over the fear of these?

    Went exploring some trails around my city and ran into several of those bridges. And I-tell-you-what... They put the fear in my heart! Needless to say i walked across most of them. (there were a couple lil baby ones that i mustered up the courage to take on) I'm wondering if anyone else has had to overcome this fear and how did you do it. I know my biggest problem is lack of confidence which leads to indecision which leads to " I'm getting off the bike and walking it". Guess when my skills get better my confidence will grow and i'll be able to trust my balance in getting all the way across.

  2. #2
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    walk it first, then ride it
    or ride it really fast giving it less time to break

  3. #3
    Never Forget 9-11
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    Quote Originally Posted by count123 View Post
    my biggest problem is lack of confidence...........

    Guess when my skills get better my confidence will grow and i'll be able to trust my balance in getting all the way across.

    You have identified the problem and the solution. It just takes time and practice. You'll get it.
    It's such a fine line between idiocy and genius.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Skills parks have things like this that are low-consequence. Separate the skill (riding a skinny) and the consequence, work on the skill first.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Skills parks have things like this that are low-consequence. Separate the skill (riding a skinny) and the consequence, work on the skill first.
    Kinda what i was thinking. Except we don't have any skills parks in the area. I actually was thinking of building one or two in my back yard. Guess thats wht i will do. Thank you all for the advice.

  6. #6
    Is not amused
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    Yip yip yip nope nope nope

  7. #7
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    Keep doing the smaller ones to gain experience. Otherwise ride more and get more used to the bike and trails to become more comfortable with it all. When you come to one after a while just look ahead, get out of the saddle and try to keep balanced - your bike wants to go roll over it!

  8. #8
    Hermit
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    Quote Originally Posted by count123 View Post
    How do i get over the fear of these?

    Went exploring some trails around my city and ran into several of those bridges. And I-tell-you-what... They put the fear in my heart! Needless to say i walked across most of them. (there were a couple lil baby ones that i mustered up the courage to take on) I'm wondering if anyone else has had to overcome this fear and how did you do it. I know my biggest problem is lack of confidence which leads to indecision which leads to " I'm getting off the bike and walking it". Guess when my skills get better my confidence will grow and i'll be able to trust my balance in getting all the way across.
    Had that problem too. Figured it out and no longer have issues.

    The thing is, the bridge is usually really no narrower than the dirt tread that you're riding on - and you usually don't have any problems staying on that, right? So the trick is to ride the bridge just like you ride the trail.

    And how is that? You glance at it as you come up on it, then move your focus ahead and rely on that previous glance to keep you on the tread, when you're actually looking further down the trail.

    So, when you come up on the bridge, look at it as it comes into view - and then, while keeping your speed from dropping, force yourself to look beyond, to the singletrack on the far side - and rely on your brain to let your muscles keep you on your track. The worst thing you can do is watch the bridge deck under your wheels - that slows you down and begs for you to ride off the edge. One glance, then focus beyond. It works.

    Good luck.

    Steve Z
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    And paddling when it's wet

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  9. #9
    RideDirt
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    Dont stare down , pretend its just on flat land and look ahead of the trail , breath , stay loose, and have fun ...

    I have the same problem since i dont deal with heights very well lol but i ride some crazy terrain lol go figure .

  10. #10
    Just Ride
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    Well you know you can ride in a straight line on the ground. Just look where you want to go and don't look down and you'll be fine.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  11. #11
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    I have this problem with drops.
    What helps is to not think about it at all.
    Aka.... ride hard so that when you get to it you are so pumped on adrenaline that it doesnt even register and you just let your body do its thing.

    Your mind gets in the way, so get a good hard ride in so your heart is pumping and your body is in control, not your brain.

    Its really an issue of Matter over Mind.

  12. #12
    Chubby Chaser
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    I can't accurately make out how far the drop is from the bridge into the water but it looks like it can't be more than 7ft on either one. Just look at it this way.... even IF you were to fall it won't kill you.

    And just FYI, with these kind of things the more you're afraid, the more likely you are to fcuk up.

  13. #13
    Bandit 29 FTW!!!
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    For me the faster the better. If I go over them slow I fell like my front wheel wobble's too much and thus more potential to go over the side.

    What really made me nervous was doing these while clipped in. You're committed at that point.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Goes Boing View Post
    I can't accurately make out how far the drop is from the bridge into the water but it looks like it can't be more than 7ft on either one. Just look at it this way.... even IF you were to fall it won't kill you.
    Yeah it's about a 7-8 ft drop on the long one.
    And its not so much the dying that worries me its the wishing i were dead. i.e. Broken bones, torn ligaments, hearing the wife nag because we cant afford for me to miss work over sum stupid mtb injury. I can hear it now. Ooo somebody put me out of my misery. Lol




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  15. #15
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    Practice like in the video. When you do decide to do it don't hesitate- go at full speed. You'll be across it before you have a chance to mess up.

  16. #16
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    The bike naturally wants to go straight. I am newb as well and I have some of these at my local trails. I never even thought of thes and just rolled right over them full speed. (Now you have me nervous LOL).

    I practice the going over a log in the skills section of my trails and got over 1 out of 10 times. Really a struggle. Then recently had a buddy convince me to go on one of the advance trails and guess what? There was a similar log (more flattened though) going over a creek (four foot drop). I cruised right over not even thinking about it. Had I known it was there I would probably not have opted for the trail and waited for it and walked over.

  17. #17
    IoC
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    Quote Originally Posted by count123 View Post
    I actually was thinking of building one or two in my back yard. Guess thats wht i will do.
    One thing that's low cost and really easy is just to buy some 2x10s (or on down to 2x4s), place them end to end in a driveway/street, and get to where to can ride them without dropping off the sides.

  18. #18
    Serenity now!
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    THANK you Hutch for that website! I've struck gold!!!

    But your creepy avatar frightens me.

  19. #19
    Sweep the leg!
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    I don't see the problem. Do you find yourself squirreling off the trail into the grass when there's not a bridge? Suck it up and ride it.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered View Post
    I don't see the problem. Do you find yourself squirreling off the trail into the grass when there's not a bridge? Suck it up and ride it.
    I do.

    Have problems keeping lines and with front wheel washing out.


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  21. #21
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    I put some 2x10 foot boards side by side tonight on my lawn to make an 8" wide 20 foot long "bridge". It took about 5 minutes before I felt really comfortable riding it with no fear of falling off the "side".

    It is totally mental. Check out that website, count123! Great tips!

  22. #22
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by count123 View Post
    I do.

    Have problems keeping lines and with front wheel washing out.


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    Don't worry about bridges for now - this is a bigger problem.

    Are you picking up cycling again after a long break, or for the first time? It may go away with a little more time in the saddle.

    It also helps to separate the action of your lower body and upper body well. What I mean is, good cyclists have their legs doing one thing, developing power, and except for really major efforts, their upper bodies are doing something totally different. I think it helps not to push too high a gear - basically, ride in the lowest gear that still lets you develop some power.

    You also need to be pretty well balanced on the bike. If you have a lot of weight on your hands, you can have a problem, and if you're really upright and have your weight really far back, the front end can wander.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    It is totally mental. Check out that website, count123! Great tips!
    I have! It's awesome info!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Don't worry about bridges for now - this is a bigger problem.

    Are you picking up cycling again after a long break, or for the first time? It may go away with a little more time in the saddle.

    It also helps to separate the action of your lower body and upper body well. What I mean is, good cyclists have their legs doing one thing, developing power, and except for really major efforts, their upper bodies are doing something totally different. I think it helps not to push too high a gear - basically, ride in the lowest gear that still lets you develop some power.

    You also need to be pretty well balanced on the bike. If you have a lot of weight on your hands, you can have a problem, and if you're really upright and have your weight really far back, the front end can wander.
    I am a first time mtb'r.
    I think you assessment is dead on with what my issues are. I'm quite positive i keep to much weight on my hands. Think it might have something to do with my long arms. Idk. I feel balanced that way. But when i go through turns one of three things happens. I slow down more than i should just to keep the line or i try and roll through with speed and my front wheel washes out or i try not to turn the wheel to much to keep from washing out and end up going off the path.

    Hopefully when i ride with a group of experienced riders this week someone can give me some insight as to how to correct my problems.

  25. #25
    Rod
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    If I find my front wheel washing out I try to put more weight onto the front wheel and plant it into the ground. I also put my outside foot down into the 6 o clock position and put my weight there as well. It helps tremendously. Just keep practicing and going faster through the turns you're comfortable with.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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