1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    I need help choosing a new bike!!

    I am looking at getting one of these three bikes, which one is the best for the price: Diamondback Bicycles - Compare Bikes

    2013 Recoil Pro 29er, 2013 Recoil Comp 29er or 2013 Sortie?

    Thank you for helping!

  2. #2
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    Of the three listed, go with the Sortie.

    At the very least:
    The comp has a crappy fork, the pro has a better fork, the sortie has a fox.
    The comp runs cable brakes, the pro has hydros, and the sortie will actually stop.
    Comp = 8speed, Pro = 9speed, Sortie = 10 speed.

    If money is no factor and you aren't one to do your own upgrades, the sortie will take you a long way. If you have been riding for a while and know you like certain components (ones that you may gravitate to again in the future) then buy a frameset. Since your asking about complete bikes, I'm going to assume that you don;t have any preferences like that. Is there a specific reason you are diving headfirst into a FS, buy the way?
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  3. #3
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    Please visit:
    Noob Buyer's Guide

    Try to answer as many of the questions. This will help us make a recommendation.

    Maybe the Diamondbacks are not the right bike for you - who knows? We're trying to save you from making a poor decision so we need to know what your expectations are.

    -S

  4. #4
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    Ok, here's the background story. I had a 7 year old Trek Hardtail that I was unable to ride because trailing my 18 month old son In his carry-on was too much with the suspension. I then started to look at a hybrid but my brother who worked at a bike park told me to go with the full suspension that locks out.

    The long and short of it is that I sold my trek and can get a diamondback at cost, which puts those bikes at about $660, $880 or $1050.

    I was going to get the 9er comp but was wondering if the extra $200-$400 was worth it. I would be doing trail riding around NY, NJ....

  5. #5
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    With xc/trail riding a GOOD hardtail will do great, and for the $$ you can get much better componants
    on it and it will be a very light bike compared to a fs bike. But I'm a HT fan and you may not be lol

  6. #6
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    In that case, get the Recoil Pro 29er. It has an RS Recon Solo Air, which is better than the Recon XCT on the Sortie. If you insist on a Sortie, you'll be better off with a 2013 Sortie Comp or 2012 Sortie 2 or 3

    -S

  7. #7
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    Which version Sortie?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  8. #8
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    Bataivah, the places around here where I would ride are really rocky, so I am not sure if a Hardtail would work best.

    Shibiwan, The Sortie Comp is out of my price range. The reason why I was including the Sortie in the mix is because for an extra $186, it has the Knucklebox.... If that isn't worth the upgrade, then the Recoil Pro 29er is where I am leaning.

    I appreciate all the help.

  9. #9
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    Never mind. Any of those bikes at those prices are going to be impossible to beat without a hook up. They are all good and the bump in price is warranted.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Which version Sortie?
    2013 Sortie - Diamondback Bicycles - Sortie

  11. #11
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    Is a FS necessary? I'm not familiar with your trails or your riding experience or goals. They are all nice bikes at good prices. Tough to make a recommendation without more information.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Is a FS necessary? I'm not familiar with your trails or your riding experience or goals. They are all nice bikes at good prices. Tough to make a recommendation without more information.
    I am looking for something that can handle a ride with my son in a trailer but can also handle as much of a mountain as possible. I love cross country and downhill with some challenging terrain to go along with daily rides around town.

    Sorry, being 30, I am stuck between riding hard but also having a 19 month old son.

    I hope this helps.

  13. #13
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    I'm with you. Maybe two bikes is in order.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    I'm with you. Maybe two bikes is in order.
    Yea. I was trying to get something that could swing both. I'm only doing between 3-5 miles when I ride with my son, so I was thinking that a lockout suspension would do the trick.

    I have a road bike if needed, but I have come to dislike the road bike.

  15. #15
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    Yeah, Anything will work. It's fine. Typically the bump in price across same manufacturer is worth it.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  16. #16
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    Why do you want to have a Diamondback bike? You can find great bikes for great prices from other more well known brands.
    Big Wheels Keep On Rolling

    Forth Eorlingas!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    Why do you want to have a Diamondback bike? You can find great bikes for great prices from other more well known brands.
    I can get them at cost, roughly 40% off retail.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendine View Post
    I am looking for something that can handle a ride with my son in a trailer but can also handle as much of a mountain as possible. I love cross country and downhill with some challenging terrain to go along with daily rides around town.

    Sorry, being 30, I am stuck between riding hard but also having a 19 month old son.

    I hope this helps.
    I'm questioning the FS for trailering. Then again I have never trailered so I don't know enough to make a recommendation one way or another.

    If you're looking a little more than XC (i.e. trail, challenging terrain) the Sortie Comp may be the way to go with more suspension travel. There's the option of selling the old bike to pay for the difference in price....unless you're on a strict budget (I was the same way at 30).

    -S

  19. #19
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    If you're planning on attaching one of those child trailers to the rear of the bike to pull it along, consider what sort of movement the mounting mechanism allows. If you have to make a stop, will it allow you to lay the bike down on the ground while the trailer sits put? If it doesn't allow that range of motion, you might need a kickstand for when you stop. That's going to be an awkward mount on a full suspension. Or just never get off the bike...

  20. #20
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    I'm not getting the FS solution for trailering. You should do a test hookup and ride. The "lockout" is the same as didn't work for you on your HT for the fork and you have an extra lockout for the shock. Seems less likely.
    Put a riser bar and grips on your road bike and take trailering out of the loop.
    Now spend $1k on a light HT with a good fork for trails.Overdrive Pro 29 has good specs.

  21. #21
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    I trailer my 2 kids on 36lbs one 28lbs, on my Jamis Daker FS bike. It is fine, a little more bob than normal but not a big deal.

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