1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New question here. I narrowed it down, please help me choose

    EDIT: I just realized I posted this in Beginner's Corner when I meant to post it in What To Buy. Sorry about that, it was an honest mistake.

    I had a good experience with a previous post on here so I thought I'd give it another go. I read the post regarding choosing a bike, which was posted at the top of this forum, and I'll answer each of those questions to simplify things. I know very little about bikes, especially components, so I would greatly appreciate it if you could take a look at these and tell me what's honestly better, because otherwise I'm a bit unsure.

    1) Your budget: I'm in the $500 or less range.

    2) What bikes, if any, are you already considering? I've considered the Trek 7300, the Fuji Absolute DX, the Giant Cypress LX, the Cannondale Comfort, and the Gary Fisher Zebrano.


    3) What type of riding do you intend to do? I will be riding daily in the city. I will mostly be on roads, however this is a very old city and the streets vary from newly paved to bumpy from very old tree roots pushing cracks in the road to completely cobblestone. So there is quite a variety in the conditions where you'll go from smooth to rather bumpy in the matter of a turn. It will probably get several miles on it each day.

    4) Do you have a preference over a hardtail or full suspension? I undertand Full to be cost prohibitive for my range.

    5) Age, weight and height. I'm 24, weigh 180, and stand 6'2".

    6) What sources will you consider buying from? I will purchase from wherever proves best for me to do so.

    7) Do you want people to offer you alternative suggestions to issues such as budget, bikes already considered, and sources? Absolutely, I've noticed that people here have quite a thorough knowledge and I'll appreciate any advice I can get.
    Last edited by shyatt3; 04-22-2007 at 06:28 PM.

  2. #2
    pronounced may-duh
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    Those are not real mountain bikes. Do you plan on doing any trail riding or is this strictly for pavement?

    If it's just for pavement than any of those bikes would be OK but a real road bike would give a major performance advantage.

  3. #3
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    It will be a bit of both. It's mainly for the road, but like I said, the conditions are rough and I will be riding on dirt paths and such on occasion. I know they aren't really mountain bikes, and that they aren't really road bikes, so I don't know where else to go to try to get advice when it comes to hybrids.

  4. #4
    pronounced may-duh
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    What I was trying to say is that you'd be better served by a real road bike. Hybrids don't really do anything very well. So maybe a road bike with slightly wider tires and a compact crank set. Or go crazy with a fixed gear track bike like the messengers use.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for your input. Can you suggest a road bike in that range? One of the reasons I began looking at the hybrids from the start is that I have back issues and my back really begins to hurt quickly when bent more in a forward position when riding (especially if it gets bumpy). My LBS had suggested some in the hybrid range so I went from there. I'm clearly a novice so I appreciate all you can give me.

  6. #6
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    Maybe a hybrid is for you. They are much more of a casual Sunday ride in the park kind of bike. If your just gonna toodle around on pavement then a hybrid will be find. Even a beach cruiser or an old ridgid mtn bike with slick tires would work fine. But if you want to go fast and far a road bike is made to perform.

    Perhaps you should look at used mtn bikes. Find an old ridgid mtn bike and slap on some slick tires and fenders and you've got a urban comuter.

  7. #7
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    good thread...im in the same boat....not sure what to get...im learning everyday something new about bikes... i have my eye on a 7200 trek hybrid '08 or a forge sanarac comfort bike ... like to get a bike with good parts yet stylish to my colors i like very hard to choose in colors for bikes...one year they have colors in one bike then they change them then they dont make it anymore...or the bike you may like becuase of its components its the color your after.... or when its the color you want it doesnt have the parts you wish it had....very difficult choosing a bike these days with so many options in price range / brand / and components / but no enough colors or style to choose from i think its easier choosing a car than a bike.....

  8. #8
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    The hybrid will get the job done well, I'd go for it. Much more relaxed position for your back too.

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